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Just how big is the 'new FamilySearch going to eventually be?

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  • James W Anderson
    I got this from another list, was disseminated to some people recently. It gives you an idea of the scale of what they are planning for the new FamilySearch
    Message 1 of 1 , Jun 4, 2006
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      I got this from another list, was disseminated to some
      people recently. It gives you an idea of the scale of
      what they are planning for the 'new FamilySearch' that
      we are all expecting as early as later this year.

      The costs on storage, equipment, etc., are going down
      all the time, but it still is beyond the comprehension
      of many just thinking about how big the new site
      eventually will be once they've scanned in just what
      they have now, and others start adding in all their
      data, etc.


      How can you understand what a petabyte is when its
      hard to understand what a billion of anything is?
      Maybe this will help.

      Gigabyte is the equivalent of a billion. We currently
      use hard disk space on our computers measured in
      kilobytes, megabytes, and gigabytes. A megabyte is a
      thousand times bigger than a kilobyte, and so on.
      After
      gigabyte, are terabytes, petabytes, exabytes,
      zettabytes, and yottabytes. They can be abbreviated
      KB, MB, GB, TB, PB, EB, ZB, and YB.

      18 petabytes is the projected storage capacity that
      will be required over time for the new family history
      system the Church is developing. To illustrate this
      you can put over 4000 names from a genealogy
      program on a floppy disk.

      Floppy disk: 1.4 MegaBytes
      CD: 700 MB or about 570 floppy disks
      DVD: 4 GigaBytes or less than 6 CDs
      HardDrive: 100 GigaBytes or 25 DVDs
      HardDrive: 1 in your PC from 40 to 500 GB in size
      10 inches of stacked 100 GB harddrives: 1 TeraByte
      A Holographic Versatile Disc (HVD) holds 3.9
      terabytes
      Library of Congress has 20 terabytes of text.
      UPS has approximately 474 terabytes of information.
      10,000 inches stacked 100 GB harddrives: 1 PetaByte
      833 feet of stacked 100 GB harddrives: 1 PetaByte
      833 feet equals about 3 football fields
      1666 feet or worlds tallest building 101 stories,
      holds 2 PetaBytes of 100 GB stacked harddrives
      18 PetaBytes equals 14,994 feet of stacked
      harddrives
      14,994 feet is almost 3 miles (15,840 feet)

      Now common commercial hard drives are exceeding 500
      gigabytes in size, so storage capacity totaling a
      terabyte or more can be reached using 2 or 3 hard
      disks, at a street cost of as little as USD $450
      (www.newegg.com). At this rate, 18 petabytes would
      cost as little as $8,100,000.00 . Since large scale
      databases protect data with multiple copies in a
      mirrored system, actual costs more than double.
      Infrastructure that supports the system could cost
      over 10 times that amount as a guess.



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