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Does this line of boxcar logic make sense?

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  • Forrest ScottW
    Hey Y all; Does this line of boxcar logic make sense? 1. Want to build a pair of boxcars, box trailers, apparently both names are used, for my G-scale
    Message 1 of 6 , Jun 7, 2011
      Hey Y'all;
      Does this line of boxcar logic make sense?

      1. Want to build a pair of boxcars, box trailers, apparently both names are used, for my G-scale freelance traction company.
      1.1 Am using 1/24 scale which makes 45mm gauge track roughly 42 inch, 1066mm, gauge.
      1.2 Cars are styled after, but rather shorter than, round-end, round-roof cars from unknown traction lines in photo bottom page 70 in Carstens Publications' Traction Planbook.

      2. Freelance company is set on a semi-tropical island.
      3. Cars would have been built locally.
      4. Of course being an island there is a boatbuilding industry.
      5. Cars will be wood - in both the "real world" and as models.
      6. Modeling materials on hand are balsa sheet, basswood sheet, some basswood strip, styrene, cardstock, brass wire and tube.
      6.1 Cars are being built over a basic 1/8 and 1/4 inch balsa sheet "box".
      7. USA Trains arch bar trucks with Bachmann 31mm metal wheels.
      8. Scribing basswood for board siding; or cutting individual 1/8 inch wide boards for siding is not overly appealing.
      9. Have seen a few prototype RR cars with plywood siding.
      10. There is some 1/64 plywood from Midwest on hand.
      11. Local boatbuilders would have marine grade plywood.
      11.1 Probably wouldn't be astonishing if RR shops and boatbuilders shared lumber supplies and suppliers.
      12. Would marine grade plywood make decent siding for a 42 inch gauge, 30 foot long car, with 7ft 6in interior height? I mean, hey, it works for boats, and they sit in water and take all sorts of stresses. Am not sure if marine grade plywood comes in standard 4x8 and 5x9 sheets as dry land plywood, but those sizes would make for easy sizing of siding with minimal joins.

      Scratchbuilding something representing a wood underframe, bolsters, with truss rods and turnbuckles is going to be interesting.
      Probably bolsters laminated from strips of 1/8 basswood sheet.
      Fine details of how to screw on trucks is yet to be noodled out.

      Sort of incidental to rest of post, cars will be painted sky blue with roof white, tan, or SP Lettering Grey.

      later,
      Forrest
    • Gordon Davis
      Have you considered using a Bachmann box car as a starting point? My favorite interurban was the Southern New York (Oneonta, Cooperstown & Richfield Springs)
      Message 2 of 6 , Jun 7, 2011
        Have you considered using a Bachmann box car as a starting point?  My favorite interurban was the Southern New York (Oneonta, Cooperstown & Richfield Springs) and their box cars were conventional ones.  They can be modified with wide swing couplers, removal of the roof walk, etc.
        Gordon D.
        ----- Original Message -----
        Sent: Tuesday, June 07, 2011 2:33 PM
        Subject: [largescaleTrolley] Does this line of boxcar logic make sense?

         

        Hey Y'all;
        Does this line of boxcar logic make sense?

        1. Want to build a pair of boxcars, box trailers, apparently both names are used, for my G-scale freelance traction company.
        1.1 Am using 1/24 scale which makes 45mm gauge track roughly 42 inch, 1066mm, gauge.
        1.2 Cars are styled after, but rather shorter than, round-end, round-roof cars from unknown traction lines in photo bottom page 70 in Carstens Publications' Traction Planbook.

        2. Freelance company is set on a semi-tropical island.
        3. Cars would have been built locally.
        4. Of course being an island there is a boatbuilding industry.
        5. Cars will be wood - in both the "real world" and as models.
        6. Modeling materials on hand are balsa sheet, basswood sheet, some basswood strip, styrene, cardstock, brass wire and tube.
        6.1 Cars are being built over a basic 1/8 and 1/4 inch balsa sheet "box".
        7. USA Trains arch bar trucks with Bachmann 31mm metal wheels.
        8. Scribing basswood for board siding; or cutting individual 1/8 inch wide boards for siding is not overly appealing.
        9. Have seen a few prototype RR cars with plywood siding.
        10. There is some 1/64 plywood from Midwest on hand.
        11. Local boatbuilders would have marine grade plywood.
        11.1 Probably wouldn't be astonishing if RR shops and boatbuilders shared lumber supplies and suppliers.
        12. Would marine grade plywood make decent siding for a 42 inch gauge, 30 foot long car, with 7ft 6in interior height? I mean, hey, it works for boats, and they sit in water and take all sorts of stresses. Am not sure if marine grade plywood comes in standard 4x8 and 5x9 sheets as dry land plywood, but those sizes would make for easy sizing of siding with minimal joins.

        Scratchbuilding something representing a wood underframe, bolsters, with truss rods and turnbuckles is going to be interesting.
        Probably bolsters laminated from strips of 1/8 basswood sheet.
        Fine details of how to screw on trucks is yet to be noodled out.

        Sort of incidental to rest of post, cars will be painted sky blue with roof white, tan, or SP Lettering Grey.

        later,
        Forrest

      • Forrest ScottW
        ... Have you considered giving me the eighty bucks to buy it - Social Security disability don t go real far these days. later, Forrest
        Message 3 of 6 , Jun 7, 2011
          --- "Gordon Davis"wrote:
          > Have you considered using a Bachmann box car as a starting point?

          Have you considered giving me the eighty bucks to buy it - Social Security disability don't go real far these days.

          later,
          Forrest
        • Noel Widdifield
          Forrest, You can pick up a used Bachmann boxcar at a train meet and you will pay much less than $80 for it. I have found them at train shows in dealers booths
          Message 4 of 6 , Jun 7, 2011
            Forrest,
            You can pick up a used Bachmann boxcar at a train meet and you will pay much less than $80 for it. I have found them at train shows in dealers booths for $20. It would be an excellent place to start.;+)
            Noel

            --- In largescaleTrolley@yahoogroups.com, "Forrest ScottW" <kitbash0n30@...> wrote:
            >
            > --- "Gordon Davis"wrote:
            > > Have you considered using a Bachmann box car as a starting point?
            >
            > Have you considered giving me the eighty bucks to buy it - Social Security disability don't go real far these days.
            >
            > later,
            > Forrest
            >
          • trolleycar68
            Hi Forrest, A lot of unrelated comments to offer. The GN Ry during WWII used plywood car sides on Boxcars and on Cabooses due to material shortages. Neither
            Message 5 of 6 , Jun 8, 2011
              Hi Forrest,

              A lot of unrelated comments to offer.

              The GN Ry during WWII used plywood car sides on Boxcars and on Cabooses due to material shortages. Neither was particularly successful. Not due to strength as far as I can tell, but requiring maintenance and repairs every two years or so, which they did not get. They were pretty shabby after only a few years. I think GTW also experimented with the plywood idea for sides on some of their cabooses.

              For the car frame, balsa would not be my first choice as it is light, and perhaps easily dented and deformed. Maybe basswood or even some clear grained pine would work better in my opinion.

              Scribing car sides would not be attractive to me either, but styrene siding already grooved to represent boards is available and easy to cement and work with, easy to finish after the fact requiring no sealing and sanding.

              If styrene sides, consider making the floor of styrene, maybe .080 thick and it will be easy to add stiffening ribs, underfloor stringers, even car side framing etc to hold the roof and siding. It is quick to glue if you use something like TENAX cement and you will not have to clamp assemblies and wait overnight for wood glue to dry.

              With styrene you can laminate layers and work with files for bolsters, rounded ends and roof, or any other special shapes you envision. Dense enough to be able to drill a screw hole and yet drive in a self tapping machine screw and hold it. It is easily cut, even thick sheets, by scoring with a sharp knife, and snapping along that line. Then some minor cleanup of the edges with a flat file to true them up as needed.

              It is waterproof and will not flex or warp over time.

              Only my opinions, but you did say styrene was one of your choices.

              Bob Kutella
            • thegreatthirdrail
              Forrest, I ll echo some of Bob s comments,, first, I would strongly recommend avoiding balsa. It s just not a very strong material to begin with and it s
              Message 6 of 6 , Jun 8, 2011
                Forrest,
                I'll echo some of Bob's comments,, first, I would strongly recommend avoiding balsa. It's just not a very strong material to begin with and it's durability over time simply will bring more anxiety than happiness.

                I would strongly recommend going all styrene here. As Bob noted you can purchase pre-scribed styrene from a number of manufacturers in a variety of board widths. Evergreen Styrene in particular is a large scale modelers friend with their large sheets of styrene measuring 8" high x 20" wide. Plenty big for a car side.

                Now to address your fixed budget concerns...
                First, styrene scratchbuilding is a lot more inexpenive than people think. You should be able to purchase off the shelf styrene for the project as described, at standard retail pricing for $25-30, and have materials left over.
                Second, if you're close to a major metropolitan area, there are many plastics suppliers that have similar materials on hand, typically in off size, bulk, scrap, that they literally give away (pennies on the dollar). You're not going to find the scribed siding, but you can find everything else.
                Third, you can purchase a quart can of MEK (Methyl Ethyl Ketone) at any hardware store, this solvent will do the same work as any solvent you'll find in the hobby shop, and the same dollars spent with last 2-3 years longer than the little bottle. Just be sure to use adequate ventilation.
                Fourth, this is a good tip that seems to be little used at times,, don't think you have to have a single thick piece for a side or floor or whatever. Again, using Bob's example of .080" for floor material, which might be a shade on the lean side to my opinion,,, get two pieces of .030" and make a sandwich, laminating some .060" stock (either bar stock or sheet) in between. It's generally a cheaper option, if you're really anal retentive can be done in a prototypical fashion to simulate car framing, and best of all, thinner products are faster and easier to cut neatly and cleanly ! When you have thicker materials, the score and snap method generally leaves an angled edge which can be significant, and needs to be taken care of. This method eliminates that issue.

                Just some thoughts
                John C
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