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  • Lara
    Hello, Saw this group from the latest issue of Garden Railways. I have an interest in primarily 1:20.3 narrow guage but have always had a lot of fascination
    Message 1 of 7 , May 5, 2003
      Hello,

      Saw this group from the latest issue of Garden Railways.
      I have an interest in primarily 1:20.3 narrow guage but have always
      had a lot of fascination with traction. In certain respects I guess
      that is not all that far off as many traction lines as I understand
      the technical term were less then standard guage also.

      However, one particularly fascinating branch to me was the Pacific
      Railways 3ft electrified branch lines.

      Right now, I have nothing under wire and am just starting to think
      about taking a bit of what I have currently. One live steamer and a
      few brass and wood narrow guage cars for use into a small gardern
      room.

      One thing that caught my eye was the Light Railways proposed wooden
      steeple cab locomotive kit and the Fall River wooden freight and
      proposed Carter passenger car kits.
    • trolleycar68
      Hi Lara, and welcome to the group. Many of us model using a scale of 1:24 so in effect the trains are running on narrow gauge relative to the body
      Message 2 of 7 , May 6, 2003
        Hi Lara, and welcome to the group.

        Many of us model using a scale of 1:24 so in effect the trains are
        running on 'narrow gauge' relative to the body proportions. (I know
        you guys, everything including 1:29 and 1:32 are also done by one or
        more of our members)

        Back to the thread -

        Denver had 3 foot gauge trolleys (where else but Colorado) and Los
        Angeles was a large narrow gauge system. [Hmm - is "large narrow" an
        oxymoron or just an odd combination of wording?] East of the
        Mississippi there were a variety (you might say a 'WIDE' variety) of
        broad gauge trolley systems. Some of these were dictated by city
        franchise requirements where they hoped to block the possibilty of the
        system being bought or controlled by a steam road with the result of
        freight trains running down city streets.

        Bob Kutella
      • Jan Girardot
        ... A narrow correction here, Bob: both Denver and Los Angeles were 3 6 gauge, probably due to the reason you put forth. Along with their city system,
        Message 3 of 7 , May 6, 2003
          At 10:26 AM +0000 5/6/03, trolleycar68 wrote:
          >Hi Lara, and welcome to the group.. . . . snip . . . Back to the thread -
          >Denver had 3 foot gauge trolleys (where else but Colorado) and Los
          >Angeles was a large narrow gauge system.

          A "narrow" correction here, Bob: both Denver and Los Angeles were
          3'6" gauge, probably due to the reason you put forth. Along with their
          city system, Denver Tramways operated a narrow-gauge interurban line,
          the Denver & Northwestern as well as a standard gauge interurban line
          westward to Golden, the Denver & Intermountain.

          > . . . . snip . . . East of the Mississippi there were a variety (you might
          >say a 'WIDE' variety) of broad gauge trolley systems.

          <groan!> On that subject: when we visited Baltimore several years ago,
          we visited the Streetcar Museum and learned that the new light rail
          system is known by museum folk as "the narrow gauge."

          . . . Jan
        • ischreiber@aol.com
          Denver & Los Angeles were NOT 3 , but rather 3 6 (42 ) gauge. Pueblo, Colorado and San Antonio, Texas were 4 (48 ) just to confuse things. trolleyira Ira
          Message 4 of 7 , May 6, 2003
            Denver & Los Angeles were NOT 3', but rather 3' 6" (42") gauge.
            Pueblo, Colorado and San Antonio, Texas were 4' (48") just to confuse things.
            trolleyira
            Ira Schreiber
          • trolleycar68
            Jan, Guilty as charged on the Denver gauge mistake. I should know better, too. I guess I could always claim I typed it correctly and the keystrokes did not
            Message 5 of 7 , May 7, 2003
              Jan,

              Guilty as charged on the Denver gauge mistake. I should know better,
              too. I guess I could always claim I typed it correctly and the
              keystrokes did not take the 6 inch part, but that would not be
              strictly accurate. Glad you enhjoyed the WIDE gauge pun.

              Bob
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