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Re: Static buildup

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  • strangeflbird
    I ve done just enough research on this p-static problem to be dangerous, so for what it s worth here it is. Without conductive paint to gather static where it
    Message 1 of 3 , Mar 21, 2013
      I've done just enough research on this p-static problem to be dangerous, so for what it's worth here it is. Without conductive paint to gather static where it builds up, wicks are useless on fiberglass aircrafts since without conductive surfaces, there's very little static for them to collect and discharge. Wicks on elevator cables would look prety cool but may as well mount them on your shoe soles. As an alternative to repainting the entire aircraft with conductive paint, a shortcut could be to paint the surfaces most likely to pick up static: leading edges (wings, stab), and engine cowling. Once applied, the conductive paint surfaces can then be connected to static wicks. It would be interesting to see if any LNC2 owner was successful with this approach. Another approach would be to focus on the canopy since most of us who've flown through p-static can attest the canopy will remind you it's there by throwing discharges at your forehead, and may be behind the avionics acting up. Plexus is supposed to be anti static, maybe applying it regularly to both sides would help some or adding a metal shield to under the glare shield would offer some protection.

      --- In lancair@yahoogroups.com, "curtismold63" <curtismold@...> wrote:
      >
      > Are you running any static wicks. Have some on the end of the rudder cable as they are the longest piece of metal in the aircraft. Sounds like you might as well rub a balloon to your hair in those conditions. Last time I was in conditions like that I was in a Aerostar with plenty of wicks and it still static discharged and fried communication radio and a loran.
      >
      > --- In lancair@yahoogroups.com, "Casey" <n99cr@> wrote:
      > >
      > > Hey Guys;
      > >
      > > Anyone putting metal mesh in their skins to deal with the Static/lightening protection issue.
      > >
      > > I get burned about once a year flying from central Oregon West over the Cascades. Descending into the Valley I usually pick up some Ice and lots of Static. I first notice my hair sticking up to the canopy, then, my VMS engine computer goes TU. One by one things start failing.
      > >
      > > Once I get out of the freezing levels and the ice melts off the static usually disipates. About once a year I can't get down fast enough and a Static discharge generates a small 2-3 foot lightening bolt which enters the radio stack and fries something. ( yes it gets your attention)
      > >
      > > My old S-Tec 50 Autopilot was ALWAYS fried from this. Partly because S-Tec does such a poor job getting repaired parts back and because the repairs are so expensive.
      > >
      > > My Advanced Flight Systems EFIS has been by far the most reliable, (having never gone dark in this situation) keeping an attitude indication in the static. (I DO have a mechanical back up AI, as well as back up radios, G 296 GPS and Garmin GPS Map/Nav on my google tablet)
      > >
      > > However my Advanced Flight Systems/TruTrack Autopilot just bit it. Flight director in the EFIS still perfect, but lat nav is fried (no EFIS, GPS and heading bug mode.)
      > >
      > > Is there any benefit to putting metal cloth on the INTERIOR of the cabin, underneath the interior to help direct away and dissipate the static build up?
      > >
      > > Seems to be a paucity of info in the 'net regarding this issue.
      > >
      > > 1500 hours so far in 20 years. still flying strong. And yes I fly it hard single pilot IFR regularly. Broke out about 700 feet this morning (sans autopilot)LOVE the AFS EFIS.
      > >
      > > Thanks for any feedback you have to offer.
      > >
      > > Casey
      > > n99cr@
      > >
      >
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