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Soda Blasting to the primer for a Re-paint

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  • Timothy
    Howdy Lancair Colleagues, This winter is going to be the year for a major re-vamp of my aircraft. It is getting a rebuilt io320-b1a engine, overhauled
    Message 1 of 3 , Sep 2, 2010
      Howdy Lancair Colleagues,

      This winter is going to be the year for a major re-vamp of my aircraft. It is getting a rebuilt io320-b1a engine, overhauled propeller, and new paint.

      Engine will be totally stock, as will be the prop (except for a black-on-white scimitar color scheme).

      I would like some inputs on the paint prep. I have been doing alot of reading on the Soda Blasting technique for removing paint. The Bicarbonate media seems to be very mild, and it is used in a number of paint removal applications. They claim it will not affect the substrate. It is becoming very popular for removing the top-coats on fiberglass corvette bodies, and also fiberglass boat hulls, while leaving the gell coats completely intact. The bicarbonate media in the super-fine grade is used for poloshing glass.

      Well, what do you think? Will it work on our planes? I am trying to locate a rental unit to try on an old cowl and nose gear door I have in the hangar. I will try to post some feedback of my findings.

      Thanks,

      Tim
    • TJ Johnson
      I bought a soda blaster at Harbor Freight (my wife manages one of the stores) and while I am really impressed with how light you can blast with it, you can hit
      Message 2 of 3 , Sep 2, 2010
        I bought a soda blaster at Harbor Freight (my wife manages one of the
        stores) and while I am really impressed with how light you can blast with
        it, you can hit glass hard enough with soda to damage it. After buying it
        (to strip the paint off of a Bonanza that I was restoring) I tested it by
        stripping an old VariEze cowl and my aluminum sailplane trailer. If you
        keep the pressure pretty low, you can take paint off carefully and leave the
        primer. If you put a bunch of pressure to it, you can actually blast the
        epoxy right off of the top layer of glass.

        Best $80 I ever spent, but be very careful and practice first on something
        that you are going to be throwing away. Make sure you have a really good
        water trap (if you get moisture into the soda tank, it won't spray) and have
        fun.

        TJ

        VariEze N25TB
        PIK20 N202PK
        Glasair II FT in progress
        Lancair Legacy will be next!

        www.simplytj.com




        On Thu, Sep 2, 2010 at 4:58 PM, Timothy <tobber2001@...> wrote:

        >
        >
        > Howdy Lancair Colleagues,
        >
        > This winter is going to be the year for a major re-vamp of my aircraft. It
        > is getting a rebuilt io320-b1a engine, overhauled propeller, and new paint.
        >
        > Engine will be totally stock, as will be the prop (except for a
        > black-on-white scimitar color scheme).
        >
        > I would like some inputs on the paint prep. I have been doing alot of
        > reading on the Soda Blasting technique for removing paint. The Bicarbonate
        > media seems to be very mild, and it is used in a number of paint removal
        > applications. They claim it will not affect the substrate. It is becoming
        > very popular for removing the top-coats on fiberglass corvette bodies, and
        > also fiberglass boat hulls, while leaving the gell coats completely intact.
        > The bicarbonate media in the super-fine grade is used for poloshing glass.
        >
        > Well, what do you think? Will it work on our planes? I am trying to locate
        > a rental unit to try on an old cowl and nose gear door I have in the hangar.
        > I will try to post some feedback of my findings.
        >
        > Thanks,
        >
        > Tim
        >
        >
        >


        [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
      • Tony Molle
        Interesting result with the too much pressure. Apart from the Lancair, I fly a cessna 150 that I was planning on repainting a while back and found a guy that
        Message 3 of 3 , Sep 4, 2010
          Interesting result with the too much pressure. Apart from the Lancair, I fly a cessna 150 that I was planning on repainting a while back and found a guy that stripped planes a few hours out of town. He told me all was safe and worryfree. A short while after that I saw a Cherokee that he had stripped. According to the owner, there was no protection anywhere so the fellow blasted windscreen and all at full intensity it seems. I saw no damage at all. But. I would be cautious either way.

          Tony Molle

          On 2010-09-02, at 19:42, TJ Johnson <misbehaved@...> wrote:

          I bought a soda blaster at Harbor Freight (my wife manages one of the
          stores) and while I am really impressed with how light you can blast with
          it, you can hit glass hard enough with soda to damage it. After buying it
          (to strip the paint off of a Bonanza that I was restoring) I tested it by
          stripping an old VariEze cowl and my aluminum sailplane trailer. If you
          keep the pressure pretty low, you can take paint off carefully and leave the
          primer. If you put a bunch of pressure to it, you can actually blast the
          epoxy right off of the top layer of glass.

          Best $80 I ever spent, but be very careful and practice first on something
          that you are going to be throwing away. Make sure you have a really good
          water trap (if you get moisture into the soda tank, it won't spray) and have
          fun.

          TJ

          VariEze N25TB
          PIK20 N202PK
          Glasair II FT in progress
          Lancair Legacy will be next!

          www.simplytj.com




          On Thu, Sep 2, 2010 at 4:58 PM, Timothy <tobber2001@...> wrote:



          Howdy Lancair Colleagues,

          This winter is going to be the year for a major re-vamp of my aircraft. It
          is getting a rebuilt io320-b1a engine, overhauled propeller, and new paint.

          Engine will be totally stock, as will be the prop (except for a
          black-on-white scimitar color scheme).

          I would like some inputs on the paint prep. I have been doing alot of
          reading on the Soda Blasting technique for removing paint. The Bicarbonate
          media seems to be very mild, and it is used in a number of paint removal
          applications. They claim it will not affect the substrate. It is becoming
          very popular for removing the top-coats on fiberglass corvette bodies, and
          also fiberglass boat hulls, while leaving the gell coats completely intact.
          The bicarbonate media in the super-fine grade is used for poloshing glass.

          Well, what do you think? Will it work on our planes? I am trying to locate
          a rental unit to try on an old cowl and nose gear door I have in the hangar.
          I will try to post some feedback of my findings.

          Thanks,

          Tim





          [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]



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