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_i·rendi tapatenda_

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  • Helios De Rosario Martínez
    In QL:89 s.v. TAPA, we can read the bracketed phrase _i·rendi tapatenda_ = thieves . This seems to be a metaphorical expression, in which the second term
    Message 1 of 2 , Mar 20, 2007
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      In QL:89 s.v. TAPA, we can read the bracketed phrase _i·rendi tapatenda_
      = 'thieves'. This seems to be a metaphorical expression, in which the
      second term _tapatenda_ literally means 'taper fingered (light fingered)',
      according to its gloss just above. (See also _tapa-tenda_ 'long
      fingered' in QL:57, equated to 'Spanish' - probably in a metaphorical
      sense, too.)

      The metaphorical relation between a "taper-fingered" or "light-fingered"
      person and a thief is quite evident, but I am surprised by the term
      _i·rendi_ qualified by _tapatenda_. Its form and the gloss 'thieves'
      indicate that _i·rendi_ is a plural form of a noun (perhaps *_rende_)
      preceded by the article _i_. But the most similar terms that I have
      found in QL or slightly later texts are those under the root RESE 'aid,
      support' in QL:79. There the form _rendi_ occurs equated to _resta_,
      itself a noun meaning '(support) kinship, kin, kindred, clan'. And
      _renda_ is given as an adjective meaning 'related, of same kin or clan'.

      _Rendi_ in _i·rendi tapatenda_ could be the same _rendi_ = _resta_ under
      RESE. The literal meaning of the phrase would then be *'the
      light-fingered kindred'. It would not be necessary to make _rendi_
      plural for matching the gloss 'thieves', as the noun 'kinship', etc. has
      itself a collective sense.

      On the other hand, it could be a plural form of the adjective _renda_
      used as a substantive. In this case the phrase would mean *'the related
      light-fingered ones'. A substantive like *_renda_ could be declined as
      pl. *_rendi_ (instead of the common vocalic declension in -_li_, i.e.
      *_rendali_), if the _-a_ were treated as coming from a semivocalic _-n_
      (PE14:42, 44, 71, 74).

      From a formal point of view, any of these possibilites are sound. But I
      find it odd that the metaphorical sense of a "light-fingered family"
      would be "thieves". Has anyone some explanation for this? Or is there
      another possible etymology for _i·rendi_ in _i·rendi tapatenda_ = 'thieves'?

      Helios
    • Harm J. Schelhaas
      ... In Dutch, a relatively common way of referring to thieves as a group, an (under)class of humanity in a manner of speaking, is het dievengilde , meaning
      Message 2 of 2 , Mar 21, 2007
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        Op Wo, 21 maart, 2007 11:55 am schreef lambengolmor@yahoogroups.com:

        > Posted by: "Helios De Rosario Martínez" helios_drm@... helios_drm
        > Date: Tue Mar 20, 2007 7:49 pm ((PDT))
        >
        > I find it odd that the metaphorical sense of a "light-fingered family" would
        > be "thieves". Has anyone some explanation for this? Or is there another
        > possible etymology for _i·rendi_ in _i·rendi tapatenda_ = 'thieves'?

        In Dutch, a relatively common way of referring to thieves as a group, an
        (under)class of humanity in a manner of speaking, is "het dievengilde",
        meaning "the guild of thieves" or "the brotherhood of thieves". So referring
        to them as a "family" or rather "kindred" does not seem odd to me. And a
        "light-fingered kindred" rather comes across as a not too distant relation of
        a "grabby guild"; even where "grijpgraag gilde" is not commonly found in
        Dutch, it will be readily understood by all Dutch as meaning "thieves".

        Suilaid,

        Harm J. Schelhaas
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