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Re: [Lambengolmor] Rhotacism and stress (was Re: "Tolkien in Oxford")

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  • Pavel Iosad
    Hello, ... This is the realm of guesswork: the rule, as given, does imply that we could have _s_/_r_ alternations in the paradigm relative to stress (witness
    Message 1 of 19 , Nov 6, 2006
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      Hello,

      > Hm. I thought the stress in _Mondósaresse_ would lie on the _e_
      > preceding the double consonant _ss_ (according to the
      > pronunciation rules as for example given in the Appendices of
      >_LotR_, although the example given there involves double _n_)?

      This is the realm of guesswork: the rule, as given, does imply that we
      could have _s_/_r_ alternations in the paradigm relative to stress
      (witness similar developments in Germanic due to Werner's law with
      rhotacised and non-rhotacised forms coinhabiting the same paradigm, as
      in OIcel _kjósa_, participle _kørinn_ 'to choose'). Indeed the very
      word _ósanwe_ could be expected to exhibit this alternation, of
      course. However, since no examples are provided by Tolkien, it is
      rather pointless to speculate whether the paradigm would be levelled
      to follow the nominative or remain true to the historical phonology;
      what we can do is only note that something like that could be
      possible.

      --Pavel
    • j_mach_wust
      Beregond/Anders Stenström wrote: ... ... May I ask for the last sign of the second tengwar transcription of Mondósaresse ? On the scan available at
      Message 2 of 19 , Nov 6, 2006
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        Beregond/Anders Stenström wrote:
        ...
        > The catalogue has arrived, and everything is legible.
        ...

        May I ask for the last sign of the second tengwar transcription of
        'Mondósaresse'? On the scan available at Christie's, I can make out
        that there is the tengwa 'esse', but I cannot see whether there is an
        acute above, and--if there is an acute--whether the acute is below the
        upper stroke of esse or above.

        grüess
        j. 'mach' wust
      • hisilome
        ... My original objection was mainly to Roman s statement that in _Mondósaresse_ the _s_ is followed by the stressed vowel, which is patently false (if one
        Message 3 of 19 , Nov 6, 2006
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          --- In lambengolmor@yahoogroups.com, "Pavel Iosad" <edricson@...>
          wrote:

          > > Hm. I thought the stress in _Mondósaresse_ would lie on the _e_
          > > preceding the double consonant _ss_ (according to the
          > > pronunciation rules as for example given in the Appendices of
          > >_LotR_, although the example given there involves double _n_)?
          >
          >This is the realm of guesswork: the rule, as given, does imply that
          >we could have _s_/_r_ alternations in the paradigm relative to stress
          >(witness similar developments in Germanic due to Werner's law with
          >rhotacised and non-rhotacised forms coinhabiting the same paradigm,
          >as in OIcel _kjósa_, participle _kørinn_ 'to choose'). Indeed the
          >very word _ósanwe_ could be expected to exhibit this alternation, of
          > course. However, since no examples are provided by Tolkien, it is
          > rather pointless to speculate whether the paradigm would be levelled
          > to follow the nominative or remain true to the historical phonology;
          > what we can do is only note that something like that could be
          > possible.

          My original objection was mainly to Roman's statement that in
          _Mondósaresse_ the _s_ is followed by the stressed vowel, which is
          patently false (if one agrees that it should be followed
          _immediately_ by the stressed vowel, just as in Verner's Law it is
          the stress on the _immediately_ _preceding_ vowel that prevented
          voiceless fricatives from becoming voiced ones [and, by extension,
          _s_ from becoming _r_ via _z_]). Thus the accent of the word should
          probably not be seen here as a reason why rhotacism did not occur.

          This is why I do not fully agree with your argument: yes, one might
          assume of _ósanwe_ that, for example, the locative could be
          _óranwesse_ ("true to historical phonology", and similar to your Old
          Icelandic example), while it might just as well be _ósanwesse_
          (analogical leveling).

          I just don't see how this is relevant for _Mondósaresse_ and its
          assumed nominative, since the stress is never in the pertinent
          syllable anyway. All one can say is that if the word's second element
          is indeed derived from SAR-, rhotacism "should" probably have
          occurred (in both the nominative and the locative), but for some
          reason it didn't. Of course it is also quite possible, as Roman says,
          that SAR- is not involved at all.

          David
        • "Beregond. Anders Stenström"
          ... There is an acute below the ascender of the esse. Suilad, Beregond
          Message 4 of 19 , Nov 6, 2006
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            j. 'mach' wust wrote:

            > May I ask for the last sign of the second tengwar transcription of
            > 'Mondósaresse'? On the scan available at Christie's, I can make out
            > that there is the tengwa 'esse', but I cannot see whether there is an
            > acute above, and--if there is an acute--whether the acute is below the
            > upper stroke of esse or above.

            There is an 'acute' below the ascender of the esse.

            Suilad,

            Beregond
          • Harm J. Schelhaas
            On reflection, I think that I should relay the following thought to the list. As I had shown Beregond s [Anders Stenström s] initial post and Christie s lot
            Message 5 of 19 , Nov 7, 2006
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              On reflection, I think that I should relay the following thought to the list.

              As I had shown Beregond's [Anders Stenström's] initial post and Christie's
              lot description to a Smial meeting of the Dutch Tolkien Society Unquendor,
              I've been relaying the discussion on "Tolkien in Oxford" here on Lambengolmor
              to an interested member of Unquendor. She is a professional linguist, and
              used to belong to Unquendor's working group on Elvish Linquistics, when that
              existed long before the time of VT, but dropped out of that field for a long time.

              (I myself have no solid background in linguistics, which is why I follow this
              group with keen interest, but usually do not take part myself.)

              On reading the rhotacism discussion, she at first thought people here were
              discussing whether the r in "_mondósaResse_" could have developed from an s.
              When I pointed out that the discussion was rather why the s ("_mondóSaresse_")
              hadn't turned into an r, her reply was that rhotacism of the first consonant in
              the second element of a compound is so unheard of, that she as a linguist had
              not realized that one would think of it at all, and that Tolkien apparently would
              have thought the same. Hence the retention of the s.

              -- Harm J. Schelhaas

              [Thanks for reporting this. I have no trouble believe it to be so, though I would
              caution that even if so, it surely depends on the age of the compound and to
              what degree it is perceived to be a compound by the speakers of the language.
              Not that either of those are necessarily at issue in this particular example, but
              something to bear in mind lest it be regarded as a rule in all cases. CFH]

              [And while I'm at it, another gentle reminder to all members to please sign your
              posts with your real names, and to refer to other contributors by real name. I don't
              mind the use of _epessi_ and other nicknames in email adresses, but I think it
              behooves us to use real names in posts and citations. Thanks. CFH]
            • Roman Rausch
              ... An example for an ancient compound with rhotacism carried out seems to exist, namely: Q _Tindómerel_ * daughter/child of twilight (V:385) with the
              Message 6 of 19 , Nov 8, 2006
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                --- In lambengolmor@yahoogroups.com, "Harm J. Schelhaas"
                <harm.j.schelhaas@...> wrote:

                >When I pointed out that the discussion was rather why the s
                >("_mondóSaresse_") hadn't turned into an r, her reply was that
                >rhotacism of the first consonant in the second element of a
                >compound is so unheard of, that she as a linguist had not realized
                >that one would think of it at all, and that Tolkien apparently
                >would have thought the same. Hence the retention of the s.

                >[Thanks for reporting this. I have no trouble believe it to be so,
                >though I would caution that even if so, it surely depends on the age
                >of the compound and to what degree it is perceived to be a compound
                >by the speakers of the language. [...] CFH]

                An example for an ancient compound with rhotacism carried out seems to
                exist, namely: Q _Tindómerel_ *'daughter/child of twilight' (V:385)
                with the primitive form given as _tindômiselde_, root SEL-D.

                But in the context of _Mondósaresse_ this discussion is now pointless
                anyway - the note from "Quendi & Eldar" Andreas Johansson pointed out
                in message #950 should have the most relevance here, I think.

                Roman R.
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