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The suffix -eg/-ig

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  • rashbold
    Just my two cents: I wrote Helge once on when he was going to revise his online wordlist; he replied to me that he hasn t found the time to update it. Make
    Message 1 of 2 , Jul 1 10:06 PM
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      Just my two cents:

      I wrote Helge once on when he was going to revise his online
      wordlist; he replied to me that he hasn't found the time to update
      it. Make your own judgement (I won't).

      [Clearly, I'm simply publishing new material too quickly for Helge
      to keep up. ;) Carl]

      Now on the suffix -eg/-ig (see _VT_ 42, p. 30 n.42):

      While it was mentioned in the editorial note that _-eg/-ig_ is a
      singular/diminutive suffix (as in _lotheg, nogotheg, lhewig,
      gwanunig_), there is also a variant form -og as in _glamog_, one of
      the Glamhoth, a kenning-word for Orc. I would surmise that the suffix
      _-eg/-ig_ was descended from primitive _*iki/*ikê_, thus we have the
      Q. suffix _inkë_ (with nasal infixion) as seen in _herinkë_ "*little
      lady_ and Atarinkë "Little Father", the amilessë of Fëanor's son
      Curufin. The S. variant -og can be surmised as being descended from
      _*-uk-_ (with negative connotations) in the same way as Q. _-uñqua_
      is to _-iñqua_.
    • Hans Georg Lundahl
      I don t know if articles on Nevbosh are accepted on this list, but here is one. A quote from the Nevbosh entry in Ardalmbion
      Message 2 of 2 , Dec 11, 2002
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        I don't know if articles on Nevbosh are accepted on this list, but here is one.
        A quote from the Nevbosh entry in Ardalmbion
        <http://www.uib.no/People/hnohf/nevbosh.htm>:

        "Another such "primitive and arbitrary sound-law" was to replace final -ow of
        native words with -oc: "how" > hoc, "row" > gyróc (but where did the gy come
        from?)"

        and another one:

        "gyróc "row" (noise) (Distortion of English word + an unanalyzable prefixed
        element gy-.) [Daniel Dawson comments: "The gy- in gyróc is probably related to
        the Germanic Ge-, which I know in at least Ger. and Anglo-Saxon (AS) tend(ed)
        to make a noun collective, or something along those lines. This is made
        plausible by the fact that one Ger. word for 'noise' is (das) Geräusch or, in a
        technical sense, (das) Rauschen, which are similar to gyróc. Additionally, my
        dictionary suggests that E. 'row' (in the sense of noise -- quite British,
        also) might be a back-formation from rouse, which is extremely similar to
        Rauschen."]"

        and a third:

        "woc "cow". (English word reversed; cf. also Latin vacca, French vache; the
        kids were well aware of this double "etymology")"

        and a final, vital piece of evidence:

        "roc "ask". Past tense *roct "asked"? (Latin rogo)"

        My two observations:

        A - since he started reversing _cow_ to _woc_, the not yet Professor made a
        sound law: Engl. _ow_ > Nevbosh _oc_. This is the first cause of _woc_ as well
        as of _(gy)roc_. That _woc_ has a phonetical relation to _vache_ as _gyróc_ to
        _Geraeusch_ is subsidiary.

        B - since _roc_ means _ask_, _row_ could not _just_ become _roc_ but one had to
        add something - like something related to Ge/OE _ge_, ME _y_ MnE _a_. THey
        settled for _gy_, an obvious compromise between _ge_ and _y_, if JRRT was
        already familiar with OE.

        I think the question is solved.

        Hans Georg Lundahl

        Gratis e-mail resten av livet på: www.yahoo.se/mail
        Busenkelt!

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