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Sindarin _Cûl Bîn_ 'Little Load'

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  • Galadhorn Elvellon
    In _The Lord of the Rings: A Reader s Companion_ by Wayne Hammond & Christina Scull, on p. 536 we find the newly revealed unpublished note from Tolkien s
    Message 1 of 1 , Nov 28, 2005
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      In _The Lord of the Rings: A Reader's Companion_ by Wayne
      Hammond & Christina Scull, on p. 536 we find the newly revealed
      unpublished note from Tolkien's _Nomenclature_ in which we read
      about the name TARLANG:

      "(...) [referring to the Mannish legend from White Mountains] The other
      giants used his body to complete the wall at that point, but left his
      neck lying southward, leading to the three mountains of the spur: _Dol
      Tarlang_ 'Tarlang's Head', _Cûl Veleg_ 'Bigload' and _Cûl Bîn_ 'Little
      Load'."

      I wonder what could be the etymology of Sindarin _bîn_ (unlenited
      *_pîn_) 'little'? It is quite a new word for me. I find only Gn. _pî_
      'anything very small; a bit, mote' and _pinig_ 'tiny, little' in the
      Gnomish Lexicon (PE11:64). In the Quenya Lexicon there is an entry:

      PIKI or PINI or PÎ
      (...)
      _pin_ or _pink_ 'a little thing, mite'
      _pînea_ 'small' (PE12:73)
      ____________________________

      It's always wonderful for me to discover that some Sindarin words are
      almost identical with the words from the so early "Gnomish Lexicon".

      [I think you're certainly correct about the etymology of S. *_pîn_ 'little'.
      QL also mentions that _-pin_ was used as a diminutive suffix, and this
      can be seen in words such as Q. _piopin_ 'the fruit of hawthorns, haws'
      < _pio_ 'plum, (berry), cherry', and _tolipin (d)_ 'mannikin' < _toli_
      'doll, puppet' (PE12:74, 94). Also note that S. _cûl_ 'load' is evidently
      from the same stem *_kol-_ 'bear, wear' seen in Q. _kolla_ 'borne,
      worn, especially a vestment or cloak' (X:385 n. 19) and _Cormacolindor_
      'Ring-bearers' (LR:953). For the phonology, cp. N. _mûl_ 'slave, thrall'
      < *_môl-_, and N. _ûl_ 'odour' < *_ñôle_ (V:373, 378). -- PHW]
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