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Re: Some remarks on _loikolíkuma_

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  • lambengolmor@yahoogroups.com
    [This is drifting off-topic. Keep any further discussion of this form related to Tolkien s own usage and inventions, please. Discussion of the development of
    Message 1 of 3 , Jan 13, 2005
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      [This is drifting off-topic. Keep any further discussion of this form related to
      Tolkien's own usage and inventions, please. Discussion of the development of
      forms in modern languages should otherwise be conducted off-list. CFH]

      1) =====================================
      On 13.01.2005, at 20:14, Rich Alderson wrote:

      > I would just like to point out that the word does appear in Modern English in
      > the old compound _lychgate_ (also _lichgate_).

      Thank you. Yes, I'm aware of this form but I understand, this being a compound,
      the first element is pronounced /litsh/ rhyming with _switch_. Only if the noun
      had survived should we see the development to /laik/ as in ModE _like_ and _to like_.
      John Cowan pointed out some more survivors of the word (also in compounds), cf.
      <http://tolklang.quettar.org/messages/Vol45/45.44>. As John also indicates,
      there is also _lyke-wake (lykewake < ONo. _líkavaka_) but I don't know how current
      the word _lyke_ is or if it is used independently at all.

      Curiously, Rohirric _laik_ seems to represent an Old Norse precursor.

      --
      David Kiltz

      2) =====================================
      Among the undead creatures described in the _Advanced Dungeons & Dragons
      Monster Manual_ (c.1980) was one they called a "lich"; I hadn't encountered the word
      before seeing it there, but it may still have had some currency before they revived it,
      so to speak.

      --
      Odysseus

      3) =====================================
      OE/ONo. _líc/k_ also survived into modern Danish (_lig_ with silent g) and modern
      Swedish (_lik_) both meaning corpse / dead body.

      Peter Edelberg
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