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Re: [Lambengolmor] "manu" departed spirit

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  • Hans Georg Lundahl
    laurifindil wrote, re Q _manu_ departed spirit ... Departed spirit: a spirit that has departed from its body (intransitive verbs of movement
    Message 1 of 4 , Jun 18, 2003
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      laurifindil <ejk@...> wrote, re Q _manu_ 'departed spirit'
      in the Etymologies:

      > ... Still "departed spirit" is a strange
      > expression... for me.
      >
      > Any thought by someone with English as mother tongue would be
      > welcome. ;-)

      Departed spirit: a spirit that has departed from its body (intransitive
      verbs of movement have active past participles formed as the passive
      past participle of transitive verbs).

      -- Hans

      [I should have added, in my original comments to Edouard's post,
      that in English one meaning of the verb "depart" is 'to die', and
      "departed" is often used to mean 'dead' or 'dead person'. Hence,
      Tolkien's 'departed spirit' == 'spirited of one departed', i.e. 'spirit
      who has passed through death'. -- PHW]]
    • Gildor Inglorion
      ... I must mention also the latin word Manes that refers to the spirits of the dead... It seems that Tolkien had this word in mind... [Pat has asked me to
      Message 2 of 4 , Jun 18, 2003
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        > Departed spirit: a spirit that has departed from its body (intransitive
        > verbs of movement have active past participles formed as the passive
        > past participle of transitive verbs).

        I must mention also the latin word 'Manes' that refers to the spirits of
        the dead... It seems that Tolkien had this word in mind...



        [Pat has asked me to note that in his previous post of today in this thread,
        the words 'spirited of one departed' should, of course, read 'spirit of one
        departed'. CFH]

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      • Edward J. Kloczko
        ... My question was addressed to someone speaking English as a mother-tongue not about the meaning of departed . To my knowledge the _usual_ English
        Message 3 of 4 , Jun 18, 2003
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          I wrote:

          >> ... Still "departed spirit" is a strange expression... for me.
          >>
          >> Any thought by someone with English as mother tongue would be welcome. ;-)

          My question was addressed to someone speaking English as a mother-tongue not
          about the meaning of "departed".

          To my knowledge the _usual_ English expression is "a departed soul", not "a
          departed spirit", isn't it? Is "departed spirit" an unusual T. construction? A new
          coinage, or not at all. Plain good English.

          I do know English... ;-) but it is difficult to "feel" it, when it is not your mother-
          tongue, if an expression is _usual_ or sounds "new" or "weird".

          Edouard Kloczko

          ["Departed spirit" sounds no stranger to my ear than does "departed soul". In fact,
          "departed soul" is the more unusual-sounding. CFH]
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