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On DTS 72

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  • j_mach_wust
    In issue #49 of _Vinyar Tengwar_, p. 40, there are some observations on DTS 72[1] with particular focus on scribal errors and on deviations from the Quenya
    Message 1 of 1 , Sep 18, 2007
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      In issue #49 of _Vinyar Tengwar_, p. 40, there are some observations on
      DTS 72[1] "with particular focus on scribal errors and on deviations from
      the Quenya mode of c. 1967 exemplified by Tolkien's _tengwar_ versions
      of Galadriel's Lament in _The Road Goes Ever On_" (the "'classical'"
      mode as Tolkien calls it in DTS 58). It seems to me, however, that we
      get a more fitting explanation of that sample if we do not consider it
      an instance of the 'classical' mode, but an instance of the "general
      use" of the tengwar (as it is called in DTS 58) that uses the Westron
      témar and tyeller assignations described in Appendix E of the Lord of
      the Rings. DTS 72 shows two characteristic features that suggest this
      interpretation:

      [[1] I.e., the _tengwar_ inscription reading "_nai elen siluva parma-
      restalyanna meldonya_"; for the DTS index, see
      <http://www.forodrim.org/daeron/mdtci.html> -- CFH]

      * The use of the tengwa ampa for "v" is characteristic of the general
      use, while in the 'classical' mode, that tengwa represents "mp";

      * the use of the tengwa anna for "y" is characteristic of the general
      use, while in the 'classical' mode, that tengwa seems to have no sound
      value of its own but is only used in combination with the palatalizing
      double dots below, thus functioning as a kind of carrier.

      There are some more features this sample shares with other general use
      quenya samples: The use of the virama dot below (which is only found
      in the non-classical texts of DTS 42 and 51); and the use of two
      separate ómatehtar for the diphthong, also found in the general use
      text of DTS 59 (in both instances in the word "nai"), whereas the
      classical modes of DTS 20, 50 and 74 write the first vowel of a
      diphthong with an ómatehta that is put on a tengwa representing the
      second vowel.

      Two features that have been noticed as differences from the
      "classical" mode do not need to be considered as such:

      * The representation of the long "nn" with a bar above númen is a
      feature that we observe in the classical mode of DTS 74 (in one
      instance), whereas the classical mode of DTS 20 uses a bar below (also
      only in one instance), so we cannot say whether this is a feature of
      the classical mode or not.

      * Consonant + "y" combinations are represented with a separate
      y-letter, whereas the classical mode samples of DTS 20, 55 and 74 use
      a y-tehta below. However, DTS 73 also used separate y-letters. It is
      not clear to me, though, whether DTS 73 should be considered classical
      mode or not. It shares some typical features of the classical mode,
      the use of vala for "v" and vilya for "w", though other features are
      different from the classical mode, the use of yanta for "y" and the
      use of vilya in the diphthong "au". If we really count DTS 73 among
      the classical mode samples, then the use of a separate y-letter is
      another feature where we cannot say whether it is typical for
      classical modes.

      ---
      grüess
      j. 'mach' wust


      [I'm approving this because I think the comparative discussion is of interest. But I don't think Arden meant in any way to imply that he considered this inscription to be "an instance of the 'classical' mode"; rather, I expect he chose the _tengwar_ mode used by Tolkien for "Galadriel's Lament" as the basis of comparison simply because it is the most readily available and most substantial exemplar from about the same time. --CFH]
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