Loading ...
Sorry, an error occurred while loading the content.

111Re: [Lambengolmor] ERRATA - VT44:9 ullume

Expand Messages
  • Alex Grigny de Castro
    Jul 21, 2002
    • 0 Attachment
      >
      >[_The Lost Road_ p. 72 does not gloss _ullume_ as 'not...forever'.
      >The entire line from Fíriel's song is as follows:
      >
      >_nan úye sére indo-ninya símen, ullume_
      >'But my heart resteth not here for ever'
      >
      >Here 'resteth not' glosses _úye sére_, in which _úye_ is the negative
      >form of _ye_ 'is' (also in Fíriel's song) and _sére_ is either the noun
      >'rest' (V:385 s.v. SED-) or a stem form of the verb 'to rest'; a case can
      >be made for either interpretation. In any event, _ullume_ thus technically
      >corresponds to 'for ever' in Tolkien's English gloss, although it almost
      >certainly begins with a negative element and must literally mean 'not
      >ever, not always'.
      >
      >-- Patrick Wynne]

      Thanks for your explanation, Patrick. Still, the whole sense of
      _nan úye sére indo-ninya símen, ullume_
      seems to indicate to me that _ullume_ should be translated "not forever",
      as it is preceded by a pause in the Q. sentence (but not in the english one)
      "but my heart does not rest here, [pause] not for ever" == "but my heart
      does not rest here for ever"

      Alex

      =====Alex Grigny de Castro
      mailto:a.grigny@...
      http://members.ams.chello.nl/a.grigny
      XelaG
      mailto:xelag@...
      http://www.imatowns.com/xelagot


      [Um, isn't this exactly what I said in my response quoted above,
      i.e., that _ullume_ "almost certainly begins with a negative
      element and must literally mean 'not ever, not always'? Tolkien's
      gloss of this line in V:72 is not, however, literal; hence you
      yourself have to reword it as "but my heart does not rest here,
      [pause] not for ever" in order to get across the full, _literal_
      meaning of the Quenya. Tolkien's own gloss, with 'for ever'
      instead of 'not for ever', probably results from a desire to avoid
      using a double negative, a real 'no-no' (!) in English. -- Patrick
      Wynne]
    • Show all 5 messages in this topic