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Opinion column from my local newspaper - Grrr . . .

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  • Colleen Newman
    Hi, Mamas. In Thursday s Opinion section of my local newspaper a columnist wrote on what she calls, the latest brouhaha over the nursing mother on the plane .
    Message 1 of 6 , Dec 2, 2006
    • 0 Attachment
      Hi, Mamas. In Thursday's Opinion section of my local newspaper a columnist wrote on what she calls, "the latest brouhaha over the nursing mother on the plane".  I cut and pasted the article below because you actually have to log in to retrieve it from the newspaper's site.
       
      I am still trying to compose my letter to the columnist. Any suggestions are appreciated. The writer doesn't even have her facts right. She WAS discreet - not that that should even matter! She tries to come off as supportive but ends up undermining the true essence of breastfeeding.
       
      Also, I received this post from the Mama Knows Breast Blog and I think the blog Andi, the author, quoted says it so well. I may just have to send the columnist the link: http://mamaknowsbreast.com/2006/12/dallas_nurse_in_a_success.php
       
      Grrr . . . that is all I have to say!
       
      Warmly, Colleen
      Author of Near Mama's Heart
      A children's book about breastfeeding
       
      -------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
      Etiquette and breastfeeding
      By Carolyn Scott, Columnist Thursday, November 30, 2006
       
      The latest brouhaha over the nursing mother on the plane caught my attention. As a nursing mother from the time when breastfeeding our babies was just coming back into fashion, I'll add my perspective.

      Breastfeeding was, of course, the only way from the beginning of time. If a woman had difficulty doing this, a wet nurse would be found. This was a woman who was still producing milk for her own children and could suckle another baby.

      There are two theories (mine) of why this changed. The use of animal milk, then formula, was suggested by a man who thought he could improve on God's plan, is one theory. The other is that is was started by a woman who figured out a way for the father to get up for the midnight feedings.

      My mother's childbearing years came during this time of thinking bottles were better for babies--and my father did get up.

      She was the youngest of six children, so had never seen her mother nurse her older siblings. When I had my first child and decided to nurse, she was impressed and fascinated. She would watch with tears in her eyes.

      She said I looked like a Madonna (not the singer). I drew the line at photographs.

      I made the decision to nurse with the encouragement of my husband (I wonder why). It was also the time La Leche League was becoming very active and those ladies provided a lot of information and support. The hospital did not.

      Babies were all kept in the nursery and mothers came down at specified times to feed them. My baby wasn't hungry at those times, but the nurses said she cried later and urged me to give her bottles of sugar water. This was advised against by the League as it would only make nursing more difficult. She soon caught on.
       
      When we went home clothing was the problem. Finding something that could easily be accessed for feeding, especially nightgowns, was difficult.

      By the time the second child came along I knew what to expect. It helped that he was born hungry and knew his part immediately.

      My mother had gotten used to it by this time but three-year-old Allison brought in her little friends to watch.

      When she grew up and had her own babies, how things had changed!

      A "lactation specialist" visited her in the Family Birthing Place at Carroll Hospital Center. She was there with information and support.

      The clothing available now for nursing mothers is ingeniously designed to allow easy and modest access.

      In my opinion, the flight attendant offered a simple and appropriate solution. If the mother did not want an airline blanket, she probably had a receiving blanket or baby shawl that would have worked as well.

      We sometimes used clean cloth diapers, but they don't exist anymore, either.

      Nursing a baby is, and should be, allowed anywhere. But it is the old refrain that one person's liberty ends where another's begins. The attendant is responsible for all the passengers and is the authority when on a plane.

      When done in public breastfeeding can, and most definitely should, be done modestly. When handled appropriately, passersby would think, except for the sound of a few gentle slurps, that the mother was simply holding a sleeping babe.

      Nursing an infant is a special bonding time for both the baby and the mother, nourishing the soul of each. As such, it is also a private time.

      Carolyn Scott writes from Westminster. Her column appears every second Thursday. E-mail her at: carolynlss @....


      Warmly,
      Colleen Newman
      Owner of My Baby and More
      Author of Near Mama's Heart - A children's book about breastfeeding
      http://www.mybabyandmore.com/NearMamasHeart.html



       
    • Jenn - All Natural Mommies
      Not only was she not correct in other aspects but her We sometimes used clean cloth diapers, but they don t exist anymore, either. Statement is not correct
      Message 2 of 6 , Dec 2, 2006
      • 0 Attachment
        Not only was she not correct in other aspects but her "We sometimes used
        clean cloth diapers, but they don't exist anymore, either." Statement is not
        correct either.


        *~*~*~*~*~*~*~*~*~*~*~*~*~*~*~*~*~*~
        Jenn - Owner - All Natural Mommies
        Jenn@...
        http://www.all-natural-mommies.com



        ----- Original Message -----
        From: Colleen Newman
        To: lactivism@yahoogroups.com
        Sent: Saturday, December 02, 2006 10:54 PM
        Subject: [lactivism] Opinion column from my local newspaper - Grrr . . .


        Hi, Mamas. In Thursday's Opinion section of my local newspaper a columnist
        wrote on what she calls, "the latest brouhaha over the nursing mother on the
        plane". I cut and pasted the article below because you actually have to log
        in to retrieve it from the newspaper's site.

        I am still trying to compose my letter to the columnist. Any suggestions are
        appreciated. The writer doesn't even have her facts right. She WAS
        discreet - not that that should even matter! She tries to come off as
        supportive but ends up undermining the true essence of breastfeeding.

        Also, I received this post from the Mama Knows Breast Blog and I think the
        blog Andi, the author, quoted says it so well. I may just have to send the
        columnist the link:
        http://mamaknowsbreast.com/2006/12/dallas_nurse_in_a_success.php

        Grrr . . . that is all I have to say!

        Warmly, Colleen
        Author of Near Mama's Heart
        A children's book about breastfeeding
        www.MyBabyandMore.com

        -------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
        Etiquette and breastfeeding

        By Carolyn Scott, Columnist Thursday, November 30, 2006






        The latest brouhaha over the nursing mother on the plane caught my
        attention. As a nursing mother from the time when breastfeeding our babies
        was just coming back into fashion, I'll add my perspective.

        Breastfeeding was, of course, the only way from the beginning of time. If a
        woman had difficulty doing this, a wet nurse would be found. This was a
        woman who was still producing milk for her own children and could suckle
        another baby.

        There are two theories (mine) of why this changed. The use of animal milk,
        then formula, was suggested by a man who thought he could improve on God's
        plan, is one theory. The other is that is was started by a woman who figured
        out a way for the father to get up for the midnight feedings.

        My mother's childbearing years came during this time of thinking bottles
        were better for babies--and my father did get up.

        She was the youngest of six children, so had never seen her mother nurse her
        older siblings. When I had my first child and decided to nurse, she was
        impressed and fascinated. She would watch with tears in her eyes.

        She said I looked like a Madonna (not the singer). I drew the line at
        photographs.

        I made the decision to nurse with the encouragement of my husband (I wonder
        why). It was also the time La Leche League was becoming very active and
        those ladies provided a lot of information and support. The hospital did
        not.

        Babies were all kept in the nursery and mothers came down at specified times
        to feed them. My baby wasn't hungry at those times, but the nurses said she
        cried later and urged me to give her bottles of sugar water. This was
        advised against by the League as it would only make nursing more difficult.
        She soon caught on.


        When we went home clothing was the problem. Finding something that could
        easily be accessed for feeding, especially nightgowns, was difficult.

        By the time the second child came along I knew what to expect. It helped
        that he was born hungry and knew his part immediately.

        My mother had gotten used to it by this time but three-year-old Allison
        brought in her little friends to watch.

        When she grew up and had her own babies, how things had changed!

        A "lactation specialist" visited her in the Family Birthing Place at Carroll
        Hospital Center. She was there with information and support.

        The clothing available now for nursing mothers is ingeniously designed to
        allow easy and modest access.

        In my opinion, the flight attendant offered a simple and appropriate
        solution. If the mother did not want an airline blanket, she probably had a
        receiving blanket or baby shawl that would have worked as well.

        We sometimes used clean cloth diapers, but they don't exist anymore, either.

        Nursing a baby is, and should be, allowed anywhere. But it is the old
        refrain that one person's liberty ends where another's begins. The attendant
        is responsible for all the passengers and is the authority when on a plane.

        When done in public breastfeeding can, and most definitely should, be done
        modestly. When handled appropriately, passersby would think, except for the
        sound of a few gentle slurps, that the mother was simply holding a sleeping
        babe.

        Nursing an infant is a special bonding time for both the baby and the
        mother, nourishing the soul of each. As such, it is also a private time.

        Carolyn Scott writes from Westminster. Her column appears every second
        Thursday. E-mail her at: carolynlss @....



        Warmly,
        Colleen Newman
        Owner of My Baby and More
        Author of Near Mama's Heart - A children's book about breastfeeding
        http://www.mybabyandmore.com/NearMamasHeart.html
      • cantaloupekitty@comcast.net
        First of all, this entire article is *not* written well. What does all the talk about babies nursing in hospitals and reasons why her mother didn t breastfeed
        Message 3 of 6 , Dec 2, 2006
        • 0 Attachment
          First of all, this entire article is not written well.  What does all the talk about babies nursing in hospitals and reasons why her mother didn't breastfeed have to do with the specific NIP issue at hand?  She could have summed up her opinion that a mom should be discreet in one paragraph. 
           
          Anyway, among the many other problems with her writing is the following sentence.  "But it is the old refrain that one person's liberty ends where another's begins".  First of all, that is not the old refrain she is trying to reference.  But even if we ignore that fact and indulge her, just where is she trying to imply that "someone else's" liberty "begins"?  In the lap of the nursing mother? 
           
          I don't really know what you would say in response.  I don't think there's a whole lot to address here since she really stated an opinion and did not really include any specific reasons why she feels this way.  I mean, why does she feel a baby nursing should be a private thing?  She does not give any real explanation for this statement other than maternal bonding which doesn't affect other people and thus is not even an argument against NIP. 
           

          ----- Original Message -----
          From: Colleen Newman
          To: lactivism@yahoogroups.com
          Sent: Saturday, December 02, 2006 10:54 PM
          Subject: [lactivism] Opinion column from my local newspaper - Grrr . . .


          Hi, Mamas. In Thursday's Opinion section of my local newspaper a columnist
          wrote on what she calls, "the latest brouhaha over the nursing mother on the
          plane".  I cut and pasted the article below because you actually have to log
          in to retrieve it from the newspaper's site.

          I am still trying to compose my letter to the columnist. Any suggestions are
          appreciated. The writer doesn't even have her facts right. She WAS
          discreet - not that that should even matter! She tries to come off as
          supportive but ends up undermining the true essence of breastfeeding.

          Also, I received this post from the Mama Knows Breast Blog and I think the
          blog Andi, the author, quoted says it so well. I may just have to send the
          columnist the link:
          http://mamaknowsbreast.com/2006/12/dallas_nurse_in_a_success.php

          Grrr . . . that is all I have to say!

          Warmly, Colleen
          Author of Near Mama's Heart
          A children's book about breastfeeding
          www.MyBabyandMore.com

          -------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
          Etiquette and breastfeeding

          By Carolyn Scott, Columnist Thursday, November 30, 2006






          The latest brouhaha over the nursing mother on the plane caught my
          attention. As a nursing mother from the time when breastfeeding our babies
          was just coming back into fashion, I'll add my perspective.

          Breastfeeding was, of course, the only way from the beginning of time. If a
          woman had difficulty doing this, a wet nurse would be found. This was a
          woman who was still producing milk for her own children and could suckle
          another baby.

          There are two theories (mine) of why this changed. The use of animal milk,
          then formula, was suggested by a man who thought he could improve on God's
          plan, is one theory. The other is that is was started by a woman who figured
          out a way for the father to get up for the midnight feedings.

          My mother's childbearing years came during this time of thinking bottles
          were better for babies--and my father did get up.

          She was the youngest of six children, so had never seen her mother nurse her
          older siblings. When I had my first child and decided to nurse, she was
          impressed and fascinated. She would watch with tears in her eyes.

          She said I looked like a Madonna (not the singer). I drew the line at
          photographs.

          I made the decision to nurse with the encouragement of my husband (I wonder
          why). It was also the time La Leche League was becoming very active and
          those ladies provided a lot of information and support. The hospital did
          not.

          Babies were all kept in the nursery and mothers came down at specified times
          to feed them. My baby wasn't hungry at those times, but the nurses said she
          cried later and urged me to give her bottles of sugar water. This was
          advised against by the League as it would only make nursing more difficult.
          She soon caught on.


          When we went home clothing was the problem. Finding something that could
          easily be accessed for feeding, especially nightgowns, was difficult.

          By the time the second child came along I knew what to expect. It helped
          that he was born hungry and knew his part immediately.

          My mother had gotten used to it by this time but three-year-old Allison
          brought in her little friends to watch.

          When she grew up and had her own babies, how things had changed!

          A "lactation specialist" visited her in the Family Birthing Place at Carroll
          Hospital Center. She was there with information and support.

          The clothing available now for nursing mothers is ingeniously designed to
          allow easy and modest access.

          In my opinion, the flight attendant offered a simple and appropriate
          solution. If the mother did not want an airline blanket, she probably had a
          receiving blanket or baby shawl that would have worked as well.

          We sometimes used clean cloth diapers, but they don't exist anymore, either.

          Nursing a baby is, and should be, allowed anywhere. But it is the old
          refrain that one person's liberty ends where another's begins. The attendant
          is responsible for all the passengers and is the authority when on a plane.

          When done in public breastfeeding can, and most definitely should, be done
          modestly. When handled appropriately, passersby would think, except for the
          sound of a few gentle slurps, that the mother was simply holding a sleeping
          babe.

          Nursing an infant is a special bonding time for both the baby and the
          mother, nourishing the soul of each. As such, it is also a private time.

          Carolyn Scott writes from Westminster. Her column appears every second
          Thursday. E-mail her at: carolynlss @aol.com .



          Warmly,
          Colleen Newman
          Owner of My Baby and More
          Author of Near Mama's Heart - A children's book about breastfeeding
          http://www.mybabyandmore.com/NearMamasHeart.html









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        • Tracy Dower
          Dear Ms. Scott, In your article you state that “Nursing an infant is a special bonding time for both the baby and the mother, nourishing the soul of each. As
          Message 4 of 6 , Dec 2, 2006
          • 0 Attachment

            Dear Ms. Scott,

             

            In your article you state that “Nursing an infant is a special bonding time for both the baby and the mother, nourishing the soul of each. As such, it is also a private time.” Why? Sharing a meal with my beloved husband is a special bonding time. It’s not private. We eat in restaurants and airplanes often. No one asks either of us to put blankets over our heads. Nursing a baby is not private; it is normal. Breastfeeding is the normal way to feed a human baby. If someone chooses to find that repulsive, it’s not the fault of the mother and her baby.

             

            My first child was born in 1990, and I breastfed her and each of her two sisters. When this recent controversy arose, I was stunned. This sort of thing never happened in the 90’s. No one ever harassed me, ever. Why? Like you, I was modest, and I assumed no one ever noticed. However, it seems quite unlikely that the answer is as simple as “I was a good public breastfeeder and these new moms are bad public breastfeeders.“


            The issue is not modesty -- that is a red herring. The issue is that many people are simply revolted by the very idea of a baby sucking on a breast. No amount of modesty will appease these people – if they know you are doing it, they will be repulsed. If the issue were truly modesty, the in-flight magazines with scantily-clad models, the in-flight movies with scantily-clad actresses, the billboards in the airport with scantily-clad women -- all of these would be banned. Not to mention all the scantily-clad passengers. However, we are not, as a society, modest. The average 18 year old girl shows more cleavage walking around the shopping mall than a breastfeeding mother shows while breastfeeding a baby.

             

            It is quite likely that you and I only think none ever noticed when our babies breastfed in public. If that indeed is true for you, then I speculate that either you weaned your babies before they were old enough to periodically want to look around (3-5 months), or you stopped breastfeeding outside the home before that time. In any case, you should be aware of two things: the normal age of weaning, and the effect of social pressure on breastfeeding success.

             

            The average age of weaning worldwide is 3 and ½ years. The American Academy of Pediatrics implores mothers to breastfeed for at the very least one year. In fact, their policy states “It is a lucky baby who is nursed for two or more years”. The policy goes on to say that the mother and baby should continue to nurse for as long as they both desire.

             

            Articles like yours imply that it’s fine to nurse in public, as long as no one can tell. You article implies this mother did something shameful. The fear of being harassed, ridiculed, or expelled will prevent many mothers from even trying to breastfeed in public. It is unfair to mothers and their babies to place on their heads the burden of appeasing anyone who might possibly be repulsed by a human baby drinking human milk. This pressure is an oft-cited reason for weaning.

             

            In light of that, please consider that it is unlikely that anyone will think a 9 month old baby is “sleeping peacefully” while he is nursing -- since he’s quite likely playing with mom’s hair or necklace or trying to stick his fingers in her nose, etc., all those little things curious babies do while awake -- and while nursing -- if they are older than just a few months. Also, since a baby is rarely held in the cradle hold after a few months of age (except while nursing) this is a dead-give-away to many people that the baby is breastfeeding -- even if they can’t see a centimeter of breast.

             

            Furthermore, because so many more babies do breastfeed these days, more people know what it looks like and are therefore more likely to notice even the most discreet mother while she is breastfeeding.

             

            I’m sadden to read that you think this incident was the mother’s fault and that it couldn’t have happened to you. I suggest that if you, as modest as you are, were to have breastfed your child on that plane that day, it would have happened to you. And, God forbid, someday it might happen to your daughters. Or worse, mine.

             

             

            Sincerely,

             

            Tracy Dower

             

             

             

            Tracy Dower
            Dallas/ Ft. Worth : Babywearing Capital of the World
            Buy the Tummy-to-Tummy DVD Today!
            $25 including shipping

             

             


            From: lactivism@yahoogroups.com [mailto: lactivism@yahoogroups.com ] On Behalf Of Colleen Newman
            Sent: Saturday, December 02, 2006 9:55 PM
            To: lactivism@yahoogroups.com
            Subject: [lactivism] Opinion column from my local newspaper - Grrr . . .

             

            Hi, Mamas. In Thursday's Opinion section of my local newspaper a columnist wrote on what she calls, "the latest brouhaha over the nursing mother on the plane".  I cut and pasted the article below because you actually have to log in to retrieve it from the newspaper's site.

             

            I am still trying to compose my letter to the columnist. Any suggestions are appreciated. The writer doesn't even have her facts right. She WAS discreet - not that that should even matter! She tries to come off as supportive but ends up undermining the true essence of breastfeeding.

             

            Also, I received this post from the Mama Knows Breast Blog and I think the blog Andi, the author, quoted says it so well. I may just have to send the columnist the link: http://mamaknowsbre ast.com/2006/ 12/dallas_ nurse_in_ a_success. php

             

            Grrr . . . that is all I have to say!

             

            Warmly, Colleen

            Author of Near Mama's Heart

            A children's book about breastfeeding

             

            ------------ --------- --------- --------- --------- --------- --------- --------- --------- --------- --------- -------

            Etiquette and breastfeeding

            By Carolyn Scott, Columnist

            Thursday, November 30, 2006

             

             

             

            The latest brouhaha over the nursing mother on the plane caught my attention. As a nursing mother from the time when breastfeeding our babies was just coming back into fashion, I'll add my perspective.

            Breastfeeding was, of course, the only way from the beginning of time. If a woman had difficulty doing this, a wet nurse would be found. This was a woman who was still producing milk for her own children and could suckle another baby.

            There are two theories (mine) of why this changed. The use of animal milk, then formula, was suggested by a man who thought he could improve on God's plan, is one theory. The other is that is was started by a woman who figured out a way for the father to get up for the midnight feedings.

            My mother's childbearing years came during this time of thinking bottles were better for babies--and my father did get up.

            She was the youngest of six children, so had never seen her mother nurse her older siblings. When I had my first child and decided to nurse, she was impressed and fascinated. She would watch with tears in her eyes.

            She said I looked like a Madonna (not the singer). I drew the line at photographs.

            I made the decision to nurse with the encouragement of my husband (I wonder why). It was also the time La Leche League was becoming very active and those ladies provided a lot of information and support. The hospital did not.

            Babies were all kept in the nursery and mothers came down at specified times to feed them. My baby wasn't hungry at those times, but the nurses said she cried later and urged me to give her bottles of sugar water. This was advised against by the League as it would only make nursing more difficult. She soon caught on.

             

            When we went home clothing was the problem. Finding something that could easily be accessed for feeding, especially nightgowns, was difficult.

            By the time the second child came along I knew what to expect. It helped that he was born hungry and knew his part immediately.

            My mother had gotten used to it by this time but three-year-old Allison brought in her little friends to watch.

            When she grew up and had her own babies, how things had changed!

            A "lactation specialist" visited her in the Family Birthing Place at Carroll Hospital Center . She was there with information and support.

            The clothing available now for nursing mothers is ingeniously designed to allow easy and modest access.

            In my opinion, the flight attendant offered a simple and appropriate solution. If the mother did not want an airline blanket, she probably had a receiving blanket or baby shawl that would have worked as well.

            We sometimes used clean cloth diapers, but they don't exist anymore, either.

            Nursing a baby is, and should be, allowed anywhere. But it is the old refrain that one person's liberty ends where another's begins. The attendant is responsible for all the passengers and is the authority when on a plane.

            When done in public breastfeeding can, and most definitely should, be done modestly. When handled appropriately, passersby would think, except for the sound of a few gentle slurps, that the mother was simply holding a sleeping babe.

            Nursing an infant is a special bonding time for both the baby and the mother, nourishing the soul of each. As such, it is also a private time.

            Carolyn Scott writes from Westminster . Her column appears every second Thursday. E-mail her at: carolynlss @....

             

            Warmly,
            Colleen Newman
            Owner of My Baby and More
            Author of Near Mama's Heart - A children's book about breastfeeding
            http://www.mybabyan dmore.com/ NearMamasHeart. html




             

          • Maria E. Vives
            Indeed flight attendants are the authority in passenger cabins--that s when it comes to safety issues, not breastfeeding. After 9/11 the government gave even
            Message 5 of 6 , Dec 3, 2006
            • 0 Attachment
              Indeed flight attendants are the authority in passenger cabins--that's when it comes to safety issues, not breastfeeding. After 9/11 the government gave even more power to flight crews; so much that they think they can issue orders on whatever they want and intimidate people. Breastfeeding, in any manner, is not a security threat. Breastfeeding mothers do not need to comply with restrictions on breastfeeding especially on grounds that nursing a baby is offensive to others.
               
              -Maria

              Colleen Newman <Colleen@...> escribió:
              Hi, Mamas. In Thursday's Opinion section of my local newspaper a columnist wrote on what she calls, "the latest brouhaha over the nursing mother on the plane".  I cut and pasted the article below because you actually have to log in to retrieve it from the newspaper's site.
               
              I am still trying to compose my letter to the columnist. Any suggestions are appreciated. The writer doesn't even have her facts right. She WAS discreet - not that that should even matter! She tries to come off as supportive but ends up undermining the true essence of breastfeeding.
               
              Also, I received this post from the Mama Knows Breast Blog and I think the blog Andi, the author, quoted says it so well. I may just have to send the columnist the link: http://mamaknowsbre ast.com/2006/ 12/dallas_ nurse_in_ a_success. php
               
              Grrr . . . that is all I have to say!
               
              Warmly, Colleen
              Author of Near Mama's Heart
              A children's book about breastfeeding
               
              ------------ --------- --------- --------- --------- --------- --------- --------- --------- --------- --------- -------
              Etiquette and breastfeeding
              By Carolyn Scott, Columnist Thursday, November 30, 2006
               
              The latest brouhaha over the nursing mother on the plane caught my attention. As a nursing mother from the time when breastfeeding our babies was just coming back into fashion, I'll add my perspective.

              Breastfeeding was, of course, the only way from the beginning of time. If a woman had difficulty doing this, a wet nurse would be found. This was a woman who was still producing milk for her own children and could suckle another baby.

              There are two theories (mine) of why this changed. The use of animal milk, then formula, was suggested by a man who thought he could improve on God's plan, is one theory. The other is that is was started by a woman who figured out a way for the father to get up for the midnight feedings.

              My mother's childbearing years came during this time of thinking bottles were better for babies--and my father did get up.

              She was the youngest of six children, so had never seen her mother nurse her older siblings. When I had my first child and decided to nurse, she was impressed and fascinated. She would watch with tears in her eyes.

              She said I looked like a Madonna (not the singer). I drew the line at photographs.

              I made the decision to nurse with the encouragement of my husband (I wonder why). It was also the time La Leche League was becoming very active and those ladies provided a lot of information and support. The hospital did not.

              Babies were all kept in the nursery and mothers came down at specified times to feed them. My baby wasn't hungry at those times, but the nurses said she cried later and urged me to give her bottles of sugar water. This was advised against by the League as it would only make nursing more difficult. She soon caught on.
               
              When we went home clothing was the problem. Finding something that could easily be accessed for feeding, especially nightgowns, was difficult.

              By the time the second child came along I knew what to expect. It helped that he was born hungry and knew his part immediately.

              My mother had gotten used to it by this time but three-year-old Allison brought in her little friends to watch.

              When she grew up and had her own babies, how things had changed!

              A "lactation specialist" visited her in the Family Birthing Place at Carroll Hospital Center. She was there with information and support.

              The clothing available now for nursing mothers is ingeniously designed to allow easy and modest access.

              In my opinion, the flight attendant offered a simple and appropriate solution. If the mother did not want an airline blanket, she probably had a receiving blanket or baby shawl that would have worked as well.

              We sometimes used clean cloth diapers, but they don't exist anymore, either.

              Nursing a baby is, and should be, allowed anywhere. But it is the old refrain that one person's liberty ends where another's begins. The attendant is responsible for all the passengers and is the authority when on a plane.

              When done in public breastfeeding can, and most definitely should, be done modestly. When handled appropriately, passersby would think, except for the sound of a few gentle slurps, that the mother was simply holding a sleeping babe.

              Nursing an infant is a special bonding time for both the baby and the mother, nourishing the soul of each. As such, it is also a private time.

              Carolyn Scott writes from Westminster. Her column appears every second Thursday. E-mail her at: carolynlss @....


              Warmly,
              Colleen Newman
              Owner of My Baby and More
              Author of Near Mama's Heart - A children's book about breastfeeding
              http://www.mybabyan dmore.com/ NearMamasHeart. html



               



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            • Heather Cohen
              that is awesome response. i chuckled at the blanket-over-your-head during dinner analogy... something i have often thought about. heather cohen Tracy Dower
              Message 6 of 6 , Dec 3, 2006
              • 0 Attachment
                that is awesome response.  i chuckled at the blanket-over-your-head during dinner analogy... something i have often thought about. 
                 
                heather cohen

                Tracy Dower <TracyDower@...> wrote:
                Dear Ms. Scott,
                In your article you state that “Nursing an infant is a special bonding time for both the baby and the mother, nourishing the soul of each. As such, it is also a private time.” Why? Sharing a meal with my beloved husband is a special bonding time. It’s not private. We eat in restaurants and airplanes often. No one asks either of us to put blankets over our heads. Nursing a baby is not private; it is normal. Breastfeeding is the normal way to feed a human baby. If someone chooses to find that repulsive, it’s not the fault of the mother and her baby.
                My first child was born in 1990, and I breastfed her and each of her two sisters. When this recent controversy arose, I was stunned. This sort of thing never happened in the 90’s. No one ever harassed me, ever. Why? Like you, I was modest, and I assumed no one ever noticed. However, it seems quite unlikely that the answer is as simple as “I was a good public breastfeeder and these new moms are bad public breastfeeders.“

                The issue is not modesty -- that is a red herring. The issue is that many people are simply revolted by the very idea of a baby sucking on a breast. No amount of modesty will appease these people – if they know you are doing it, they will be repulsed. If the issue were truly modesty, the in-flight magazines with scantily-clad models, the in-flight movies with scantily-clad actresses, the billboards in the airport with scantily-clad women -- all of these would be banned. Not to mention all the scantily-clad passengers. However, we are not, as a society, modest. The average 18 year old girl shows more cleavage walking around the shopping mall than a breastfeeding mother shows while breastfeeding a baby.
                It is quite likely that you and I only think none ever noticed when our babies breastfed in public. If that indeed is true for you, then I speculate that either you weaned your babies before they were old enough to periodically want to look around (3-5 months), or you stopped breastfeeding outside the home before that time. In any case, you should be aware of two things: the normal age of weaning, and the effect of social pressure on breastfeeding success.
                The average age of weaning worldwide is 3 and ½ years. The American Academy of Pediatrics implores mothers to breastfeed for at the very least one year. In fact, their policy states “It is a lucky baby who is nursed for two or more years”. The policy goes on to say that the mother and baby should continue to nurse for as long as they both desire.
                Articles like yours imply that it’s fine to nurse in public, as long as no one can tell. You article implies this mother did something shameful. The fear of being harassed, ridiculed, or expelled will prevent many mothers from even trying to breastfeed in public. It is unfair to mothers and their babies to place on their heads the burden of appeasing anyone who might possibly be repulsed by a human baby drinking human milk. This pressure is an oft-cited reason for weaning.
                In light of that, please consider that it is unlikely that anyone will think a 9 month old baby is “sleeping peacefully” while he is nursing -- since he’s quite likely playing with mom’s hair or necklace or trying to stick his fingers in her nose, etc., all those little things curious babies do while awake -- and while nursing -- if they are older than just a few months. Also, since a baby is rarely held in the cradle hold after a few months of age (except while nursing) this is a dead-give-away to many people that the baby is breastfeeding -- even if they can’t see a centimeter of breast.
                Furthermore, because so many more babies do breastfeed these days, more people know what it looks like and are therefore more likely to notice even the most discreet mother while she is breastfeeding.
                I’m sadden to read that you think this incident was the mother’s fault and that it couldn’t have happened to you. I suggest that if you, as modest as you are, were to have breastfed your child on that plane that day, it would have happened to you. And, God forbid, someday it might happen to your daughters. Or worse, mine.
                Sincerely,
                Tracy Dower
                Tracy Dower
                Dallas/ Ft. Worth : Babywearing Capital of the World
                Buy the Tummy-to-Tummy DVD Today!
                $25 including shipping

                From: lactivism@yahoogrou ps.com [mailto: lactivism@yahoogrou ps.com ] On Behalf Of Colleen Newman
                Sent: Saturday, December 02, 2006 9:55 PM
                To: lactivism@yahoogrou ps.com
                Subject: [lactivism] Opinion column from my local newspaper - Grrr . . .
                Hi, Mamas. In Thursday's Opinion section of my local newspaper a columnist wrote on what she calls, "the latest brouhaha over the nursing mother on the plane".  I cut and pasted the article below because you actually have to log in to retrieve it from the newspaper's site.
                I am still trying to compose my letter to the columnist. Any suggestions are appreciated. The writer doesn't even have her facts right. She WAS discreet - not that that should even matter! She tries to come off as supportive but ends up undermining the true essence of breastfeeding.
                Also, I received this post from the Mama Knows Breast Blog and I think the blog Andi, the author, quoted says it so well. I may just have to send the columnist the link: http://mamaknowsbre ast.com/2006/ 12/dallas_ nurse_in_ a_success. php
                Grrr . . . that is all I have to say!
                Warmly, Colleen
                Author of Near Mama's Heart
                A children's book about breastfeeding
                ------------ --------- --------- --------- --------- --------- --------- --------- --------- --------- --------- -------
                Etiquette and breastfeeding
                By Carolyn Scott, Columnist
                Thursday, November 30, 2006
                The latest brouhaha over the nursing mother on the plane caught my attention. As a nursing mother from the time when breastfeeding our babies was just coming back into fashion, I'll add my perspective.

                Breastfeeding was, of course, the only way from the beginning of time. If a woman had difficulty doing this, a wet nurse would be found. This was a woman who was still producing milk for her own children and could suckle another baby.

                There are two theories (mine) of why this changed. The use of animal milk, then formula, was suggested by a man who thought he could improve on God's plan, is one theory. The other is that is was started by a woman who figured out a way for the father to get up for the midnight feedings.

                My mother's childbearing years came during this time of thinking bottles were better for babies--and my father did get up.

                She was the youngest of six children, so had never seen her mother nurse her older siblings. When I had my first child and decided to nurse, she was impressed and fascinated. She would watch with tears in her eyes.

                She said I looked like a Madonna (not the singer). I drew the line at photographs.

                I made the decision to nurse with the encouragement of my husband (I wonder why). It was also the time La Leche League was becoming very active and those ladies provided a lot of information and support. The hospital did not.

                Babies were all kept in the nursery and mothers came down at specified times to feed them. My baby wasn't hungry at those times, but the nurses said she cried later and urged me to give her bottles of sugar water. This was advised against by the League as it would only make nursing more difficult. She soon caught on.
                When we went home clothing was the problem. Finding something that could easily be accessed for feeding, especially nightgowns, was difficult.

                By the time the second child came along I knew what to expect. It helped that he was born hungry and knew his part immediately.

                My mother had gotten used to it by this time but three-year-old Allison brought in her little friends to watch.

                When she grew up and had her own babies, how things had changed!

                A "lactation specialist" visited her in the Family Birthing Place at Carroll Hospital Center . She was there with information and support.

                The clothing available now for nursing mothers is ingeniously designed to allow easy and modest access.

                In my opinion, the flight attendant offered a simple and appropriate solution. If the mother did not want an airline blanket, she probably had a receiving blanket or baby shawl that would have worked as well.

                We sometimes used clean cloth diapers, but they don't exist anymore, either.

                Nursing a baby is, and should be, allowed anywhere. But it is the old refrain that one person's liberty ends where another's begins. The attendant is responsible for all the passengers and is the authority when on a plane.

                When done in public breastfeeding can, and most definitely should, be done modestly. When handled appropriately, passersby would think, except for the sound of a few gentle slurps, that the mother was simply holding a sleeping babe.

                Nursing an infant is a special bonding time for both the baby and the mother, nourishing the soul of each. As such, it is also a private time.

                Carolyn Scott writes from Westminster . Her column appears every second Thursday. E-mail her at: carolynlss @....
                Warmly,
                Colleen Newman
                Owner of My Baby and More
                Author of Near Mama's Heart - A children's book about breastfeeding
                http://www.mybabyan dmore.com/ NearMamasHeart. html



                 


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