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Sanding a slope

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  • Lord Fróði Farmansson
    Thanks, Debbie, for the R.B. Hines file. It is certainly safer than the method I ve been using to create slopes in my marudais. What I do causes my wife to
    Message 1 of 2 , Oct 1, 2010
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      Thanks, Debbie, for the R.B. Hines file. It is certainly safer than the
      method I've been using to create slopes in my marudais. What I do causes my
      wife to feel nauseous and I so I only do it when she's not around.

      NOT recommended for novice woodworkers:

      I set up a V-shaped jig on my table saw using scrap pieces of 2 x 4. The V
      is there so that when I place the disk on the surface, the center of it is
      directly over the blade of the table saw. Then I raise the blade anywhere
      from 3/8" to 3/4" above the level of the table. Next, I turn on the saw and
      carefully--very carefully--lower the disk onto the spinning blade. Once
      placed, of course, there is a blade-sized arc-shaped groove cut into the top
      of the disk (which, remember, is facing down on the table). Next, I slowly
      rotate the disk 360 degrees so that the result is a depression that exactly
      matches the shape of the blade. This creates a rough surface, so I have to
      do a fair amount of sanding by hand to make the surface of the depression
      smooth, usually starting with a 100 grit sandpaper and gradually moving to
      1000 grit, by which time it is super smooth.

      Did I mention that this is not for novice woodworkers? I only share it with
      the group because it's a method which may work for some people with the
      right skills and tools. My wife hates it, but I find it to be pretty quick
      and effective. My shoulders do get sore from all the sanding, though...

      If you want to see the result of this method, go to the pictures section and
      look in the folder labeled "Frodi's works" where I have pictures of a couple
      of marudais I have made.

      Anyone in the area of southern Arizona who would like to have some help
      making marudais, from stools or from scratch, should send me a message
      off-list and I am happy to open up my garage/workshop to assist. I live in
      the Southwest part of town, near Irvington and I-19. I have all the tools
      necessary; you would just need to bring the wood. Exotic hardwoods make
      some beautiful marudais!

      --
      Lord Fróði


      [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
    • Todd Rich
      On Fri, 1 Oct 2010, Lord Fróði Farmansson wrote: (snip) ... I use a 2 forstner bit to drill the through hole, then I use a large panel raising bit on a
      Message 2 of 2 , Oct 1, 2010
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        On Fri, 1 Oct 2010, Lord Fróði Farmansson wrote:
        (snip)
        > I set up a V-shaped jig on my table saw using scrap pieces of 2 x 4. The V
        > is there so that when I place the disk on the surface, the center of it is
        > directly over the blade of the table saw. Then I raise the blade anywhere
        > from 3/8" to 3/4" above the level of the table. Next, I turn on the saw and
        > carefully--very carefully--lower the disk onto the spinning blade. Once
        > placed, of course, there is a blade-sized arc-shaped groove cut into the top
        > of the disk (which, remember, is facing down on the table). Next, I slowly
        > rotate the disk 360 degrees so that the result is a depression that exactly
        > matches the shape of the blade. This creates a rough surface, so I have to
        > do a fair amount of sanding by hand to make the surface of the depression
        > smooth, usually starting with a 100 grit sandpaper and gradually moving to
        > 1000 grit, by which time it is super smooth.
        >
        I use a 2" forstner bit to drill the through hole, then I use a large
        panel raising bit on a router to get my slope. About 20 minutes to get
        the hole and slope, then another 10 to sand it to usability. It is kind
        of a stepped slope, but it works well for me.
        Todd

        [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
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