Loading ...
Sorry, an error occurred while loading the content.

Which braiding stand would you get?

Expand Messages
  • Anne Littlebird
    Alright this should be fun. If you have a marudai and could get one more stand only, which one would it be. And why? It s a tough call right now between a
    Message 1 of 17 , Aug 5, 2009
    • 0 Attachment
      Alright this should be fun.

      If you have a marudai and could get one more stand only, which one would it be. And why?

      It's a tough call right now between a kakudai, karakumidai or an ayatakedai. If worse came to worse I could improvise a kakudai but not the others.

      So what would it be? Pro and cons are eagerly accepted.

      Anne
    • Cynce Williams
      ayatakadai. I haven t been checking books, but are there any instructions out for a karakumidai? It looks fascinating, but I m not about to try it without some
      Message 2 of 17 , Aug 5, 2009
      • 0 Attachment
        ayatakadai.

        I haven't been checking books, but are there any instructions out for
        a karakumidai? It looks fascinating, but I'm not about to try it
        without some kind of info on how to use it.

        With BraidersHand's ayatakadai you have the best of all possible
        worlds. You can use it as a takadai for bias braids or you can set it
        up to work as an ayatakedai and do twisted cord braids like tablet
        weaving.

        Cynthia


        On Aug 5, 2009, at 5:49 PM, Anne Littlebird wrote:

        > Alright this should be fun.
        >
        > If you have a marudai and could get one more stand only, which one
        > would it be. And why?
        >
        > It's a tough call right now between a kakudai, karakumidai or an
        > ayatakedai. If worse came to worse I could improvise a kakudai but
        > not the others.
        >
        > So what would it be? Pro and cons are eagerly accepted.
        >
        > Anne



        [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
      • none redmond
        You don t mention the takadai. I have marudai and I love them and use them. But to my mind the most versatile and interesting piece of braiding equipment you
        Message 3 of 17 , Aug 5, 2009
        • 0 Attachment
          You don't mention the takadai.
          I have marudai and I love them and use them. But to my mind the most
          versatile and interesting piece of braiding equipment you can own is
          the takadai. I braid on mine every day if i possibly can and it never
          loses its delight, its teaching nor its ability to create beauty. Some
          takadai can also be converted.

          None Redmond
          On Wednesday, August 5, 2009, at 03:49 PM, Anne Littlebird wrote:

          > �
          > Alright this should be fun.
          >
          > If you have a marudai and could get one more stand only, which one
          > would it be. And why?
          >
          > It's a tough call right now between a kakudai, karakumidai or an
          > ayatakedai. If worse came to worse I could improvise a kakudai but not
          > the others.
          >
          > So what would it be? Pro and cons are eagerly accepted.
          >
          > Anne
          >
          >


          [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
        • Anne Littlebird
          You are right None I didn t. I had a takadai for a while but sold it when there was a move overseas. Well long story short I m now in the US in a small space.
          Message 4 of 17 , Aug 5, 2009
          • 0 Attachment
            You are right None I didn't. I had a takadai for a while but sold it
            when there was a move overseas. Well long story short I'm now in the
            US in a small space. So there isn't much room for 'bigger' equipment.
            it's a little harder to break down and store the takadai in the space
            available. Here the 3 other possibilities.

            On Aug 5, 2009, at 7:26 PM, none redmond wrote:

            > You don't mention the takadai.
            > I have marudai and I love them and use them. But to my mind the most
            > versatile and interesting piece of braiding equipment you can own is
            > the takadai. I braid on mine every day if i possibly can and it never
            > loses its delight, its teaching nor its ability to create beauty. Some
            > takadai can also be converted.
            >
            > None Redmond
            > On Wednesday, August 5, 2009, at 03:49 PM, Anne Littlebird wrote:
            >
            >>
            >> Alright this should be fun.
            >>
            >> If you have a marudai and could get one more stand only, which one
            >> would it be. And why?
            >>
            >> It's a tough call right now between a kakudai, karakumidai or an
            >> ayatakedai. If worse came to worse I could improvise a kakudai but
            >> not
            >> the others.
            >>
            >> So what would it be? Pro and cons are eagerly accepted.
            >>
            >> Anne
            >>
            >>
            >
            >
            > [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
            >
            >
            >
            > ------------------------------------
            >
            > Yahoo! Groups Links
            >
            >
            >

            Anne Littlebird
            Issumatuq Herbals
          • Tammy Uren
            Wow, I m just learning how to use the Marudai, still trying to learn how to add beads and have it come out looking as good as the pictures I see here. Just
            Message 5 of 17 , Aug 5, 2009
            • 0 Attachment
              Wow, I'm just learning how to use the Marudai, still trying to learn how to
              add beads and have it come out looking as good as the pictures I see here.
              Just haven't been able to do it yet. One of these days it will click in I'm
              not giving up
              So as to what other stand would I get? I'd really love to have a beautiful
              authentic Marudai maybe an antique that had been used by someone whose hands
              knew where to go. Might help to guide me
              Tammy

              On Wed, Aug 5, 2009 at 7:40 PM, Anne Littlebird <issumatuq@...> wrote:

              >
              >
              > You are right None I didn't. I had a takadai for a while but sold it
              > when there was a move overseas. Well long story short I'm now in the
              > US in a small space. So there isn't much room for 'bigger' equipment.
              > it's a little harder to break down and store the takadai in the space
              > available. Here the 3 other possibilities.
              >
              > On Aug 5, 2009, at 7:26 PM, none redmond wrote:
              >
              > > You don't mention the takadai.
              > > I have marudai and I love them and use them. But to my mind the most
              > > versatile and interesting piece of braiding equipment you can own is
              > > the takadai. I braid on mine every day if i possibly can and it never
              > > loses its delight, its teaching nor its ability to create beauty. Some
              > > takadai can also be converted.
              > >
              > > None Redmond
              > > On Wednesday, August 5, 2009, at 03:49 PM, Anne Littlebird wrote:
              > >
              > >>
              > >> Alright this should be fun.
              > >>
              > >> If you have a marudai and could get one more stand only, which one
              > >> would it be. And why?
              > >>
              > >> It's a tough call right now between a kakudai, karakumidai or an
              > >> ayatakedai. If worse came to worse I could improvise a kakudai but
              > >> not
              > >> the others.
              > >>
              > >> So what would it be? Pro and cons are eagerly accepted.
              > >>
              > >> Anne
              > >>
              > >>
              > >
              > >
              > > [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
              > >
              > >
              > >
              > > ------------------------------------
              > >
              > > Yahoo! Groups Links
              > >
              > >
              > >
              >
              > Anne Littlebird
              > Issumatuq Herbals
              >
              >
              >


              [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
            • John Whitley
              ... I have a booklet on the Karakumidai written by Noné Redmond that I got from Janis at Braidershand. It has detailed text with both hand-drawn
              Message 6 of 17 , Aug 5, 2009
              • 0 Attachment
                Cynce Williams wrote:
                > I haven't been checking books, but are there any instructions out for
                > a karakumidai? It looks fascinating, but I'm not about to try it
                > without some kind of info on how to use it.
                >
                I have a booklet on the Karakumidai written by Noné Redmond that I got
                from Janis at Braidershand. It has detailed text with both hand-drawn
                illustrations and photos. It discusses the basics pretty well, and
                goes through a belt project.

                -- John




                [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
              • giovanna imperia
                The karakumi dai is very interesting. As a stand, it is very compact and suitable for small spaces. However, you can only do one type of braid structure on
                Message 7 of 17 , Aug 6, 2009
                • 0 Attachment
                  The karakumi dai is very interesting. As a stand, it is very compact and suitable for small spaces. However, you can only do one type of braid structure on it. So, if you are looking for variety, that dai may not be it. The ayatake dai may not solve your space problems. The only one currently available in the US is from Braidershand. It is beautiful but because it uses the same frame as the taka dai (it is actually an convertible unit called ayataka dai), it takes pretty much the same amount of space. If you have the book "Kumihimo Essence" there are pictures there of a smaller ayataka dai (the convertible unit) which is very compact and intended to be used while kneeling in front. I do have that dai and it definitely takes less space than the Western style dai. However, I got mine in Japan and I do not know if there is anyone that makes that type of dai in the West.
                  I personally love the kaku dai because it allows you to make some very interesting structures that can only be done with it. Other structures can easily be replicated on the maru dai. I do not believe you can improvise a kaku dai. It is not just an issue of suspending the braid above the mirror. The kaku dai utilizes three tools that act as temporary cores (i.e. you braid around these tools). Without them, you will not have a proper kaku dai braid. I believe braidershand makes kaku dai.
                  Giovanna

                  To: kumi2@yahoogroups.com
                  From: issumatuq@...
                  Date: Wed, 5 Aug 2009 22:49:41 +0000
                  Subject: [kumi2] Which braiding stand would you get?





















                  Alright this should be fun.



                  If you have a marudai and could get one more stand only, which one would it be. And why?



                  It's a tough call right now between a kakudai, karakumidai or an ayatakedai. If worse came to worse I could improvise a kakudai but not the others.



                  So what would it be? Pro and cons are eagerly accepted.



                  Anne






















                  _________________________________________________________________
                  Windows Live�: Keep your life in sync.
                  http://windowslive.com/explore?ocid=PID23384::T:WLMTAGL:ON:WL:en-US:NF_BR_sync:082009

                  [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
                • Janis Saunders
                  This has been a most interesting thread. Thank you Giovanna for mentioning BraidersHand equipment. We do make a free standing ayatakedai and can make it short
                  Message 8 of 17 , Aug 6, 2009
                  • 0 Attachment
                    This has been a most interesting thread.

                    Thank you Giovanna for mentioning BraidersHand
                    equipment. We do make a free standing ayatakedai
                    and can make it short for kneeling, however it is
                    wider than the Japanese version.

                    Our kakudai isn't on the website yet, please check in a few days.

                    Janis
                    www.braidershand.com
                    www.weavershand.com

                    At 06:22 AM 8/6/2009, you wrote:

                    >The karakumi dai is very interesting. As a
                    >stand, it is very compact and suitable for small
                    >spaces. However, you can only do one type of
                    >braid structure on it. So, if you are looking
                    >for variety, that dai may not be it. The
                    >ayatake dai may not solve your space
                    >problems. The only one currently available in
                    >the US is from Braidershand. It is beautiful
                    >but because it uses the same frame as the taka
                    >dai (it is actually an convertible unit called
                    >ayataka dai), it takes pretty much the same
                    >amount of space. If you have the book "Kumihimo
                    >Essence" there are pictures there of a smaller
                    >ayataka dai (the convertible unit) which is very
                    >compact and intended to be used while kneeling
                    >in front. I do have that dai and it definitely
                    >takes less space than the Western style
                    >dai. However, I got mine in Japan and I do not
                    >know if there is anyone that makes that type of dai in the West.
                    >I personally love the kaku dai because it allows
                    >you to make some very interesting structures
                    >that can only be done with it. Other structures
                    >can easily be replicated on the maru dai. I do
                    >not believe you can improvise a kaku dai. It is
                    >not just an issue of suspending the braid above
                    >the mirror. The kaku dai utilizes three tools
                    >that act as temporary cores (i.e. you braid
                    >around these tools). Without them, you will not
                    >have a proper kaku dai braid. I believe braidershand makes kaku dai.
                    >Giovanna
                    >
                    >To: kumi2@yahoogroups.com
                    >From: issumatuq@...
                    >Date: Wed, 5 Aug 2009 22:49:41 +0000
                    >Subject: [kumi2] Which braiding stand would you get?
                    >
                    >
                    >
                    >
                    >
                    >
                    >
                    >
                    >
                    >
                    >
                    >
                    >
                    >
                    >
                    >
                    >
                    >
                    >
                    >
                    >
                    > Alright this should be fun.
                    >
                    >
                    >
                    >If you have a marudai and could get one more
                    >stand only, which one would it be. And why?
                    >
                    >
                    >
                    >It's a tough call right now between a kakudai,
                    >karakumidai or an ayatakedai. If worse came to
                    >worse I could improvise a kakudai but not the others.
                    >
                    >
                    >
                    >So what would it be? Pro and cons are eagerly accepted.
                    >
                    >
                    >
                    >Anne
                    >
                    >
                    >
                    >
                    >
                    >
                    >
                    >
                    >
                    >
                    >
                    >
                    >
                    >
                    >
                    >
                    >
                    >
                    >
                    >
                    >
                    >
                    >_________________________________________________________________
                    >Windows Live™: Keep your life in sync.
                    >http://windowslive.com/explore?ocid=PID23384::T:WLMTAGL:ON:WL:en-US:NF_BR_sync:082009
                    >
                    >[Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
                    >
                    >
                    >
                    >------------------------------------
                    >
                    >Yahoo! Groups Links
                    >
                    >
                    >
                  • Elisa Eiger
                    Although Anne points out that she deliberately left the takadai off her list for reasons of space...I m still with Cynthia and None on the ayatakadai (combo
                    Message 9 of 17 , Aug 6, 2009
                    • 0 Attachment
                      Although Anne points out that she deliberately left the takadai off
                      her list for reasons of space...I'm still with Cynthia and None on the
                      ayatakadai (combo ayatakedai and takadai). Mine is currently broken
                      down into a 8 x 8 x 28" duffle bag, with room to spare (even though
                      there's a very large plastic box (rifle case?) in the bag that holds
                      my koma, hane, sword, and other bits). I have a Leanda model, and
                      have added T-nuts and screw-in 8" table legs from the hardware store
                      so that it can be set up at chair height. It seems to me that even if
                      all that you can readily set up for now is the ayatakedai portion,
                      it'd be nice to have the other pieces for later. (I really like my
                      takadai!)

                      Failing that...I'd vote for the ayatakedai. I'm not at all familiar
                      with it (haven't set up my ayatakadai up as a ayatakedai yet) but it
                      just LOOKS cool. It seems to me that you *could* rig up a kakudai
                      (though my understanding is that Braidershand will be making one
                      soon), and while I'm VERY intrigued by the karakumidai, I wonder if
                      one would get tired of having just the one basic structural unit with
                      which to work. (On the other hand, there are a LOT of ways to put
                      those units together, and I've seem some circular and freeform pieces
                      that are to die for.)

                      My understanding is that the ayatakedai requires heavy tama. FWIW,
                      the spool-shaped ceramic electric fence insulator caps 1 5/8" long and
                      1 1/2" in diameter, which often recommended as cheap tama substitutes,
                      are about 85g each, and a 1" x 1/4 carriage bolt can be run through
                      the center of one and fastened with a hex nut to make it 100g.

                      --Elisa
                    • Cynce Williams
                      35¢, i.e. 35 US pennies in a film canister is 100 gm. Imagine the funny looks I got at the bank asking for $10 in pennies. I also like the idea of the lid
                      Message 10 of 17 , Aug 6, 2009
                      • 0 Attachment
                        35¢, i.e. 35 US pennies in a film canister is 100 gm. Imagine the
                        funny looks I got at the bank asking for $10 in pennies. I also like
                        the idea of the lid giving me definite sides so I can unwind just by
                        feel rather than looking which way the knot goes.

                        Cynthia


                        On Aug 6, 2009, at 11:11 AM, Elisa Eiger wrote:

                        >
                        > My understanding is that the ayatakedai requires heavy tama. FWIW,
                        > the spool-shaped ceramic electric fence insulator caps 1 5/8" long and
                        > 1 1/2" in diameter, which often recommended as cheap tama substitutes,
                        > are about 85g each, and a 1" x 1/4 carriage bolt can be run through
                        > the center of one and fastened with a hex nut to make it 100g.



                        [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
                      • Anne Littlebird
                        My there are so many different ideas! I love it. Elisa I know that a duffle bag sounds small but I m talking about a 130 square foot house. You can see one
                        Message 11 of 17 , Aug 6, 2009
                        • 0 Attachment
                          My there are so many different ideas! I love it.

                          Elisa I know that a duffle bag sounds small but I'm talking about a
                          130 square foot house. You can see one here if you are interested. http://www.tumbleweedhouses.com/houses/fencl/

                          There is not much space so everything must really be compacted. I have
                          a chance to try to live in one of these, for free.

                          I have no problem with the karakumidai being limited to one technique.
                          Personally I think you could spend quite a while perfecting technique.
                          I'd love to make a traditional hirao for example. I am sure that it
                          would take some time to perfect that.

                          Wonderful suggestions!
                        • Lark Burger
                          Wow! 130 square feet would really make you think hard about what you could include among your necessities of life.     Lark ... From: Anne Littlebird
                          Message 12 of 17 , Aug 6, 2009
                          • 0 Attachment
                            Wow! 130 square feet would really make you think hard about what you could include among your "necessities of life." 
                             
                            Lark

                            --- On Thu, 8/6/09, Anne Littlebird <issumatuq@...> wrote:


                            From: Anne Littlebird <issumatuq@...>
                            Subject: Re: [kumi2] Re: Which braiding stand would you get?
                            To: kumi2@yahoogroups.com
                            Date: Thursday, August 6, 2009, 5:35 PM


                             



                            My there are so many different ideas! I love it.

                            Elisa I know that a duffle bag sounds small but I'm talking about a
                            130 square foot house. You can see one here if you are interested. http://www.tumblewe edhouses. com/houses/ fencl/

                            There is not much space so everything must really be compacted. I have
                            a chance to try to live in one of these, for free.

                            I have no problem with the karakumidai being limited to one technique.
                            Personally I think you could spend quite a while perfecting technique.
                            I'd love to make a traditional hirao for example. I am sure that it
                            would take some time to perfect that.

                            Wonderful suggestions!
















                            [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
                          • giovanna imperia
                            First off: this is the cutest house I have ever seen. Having grown up in Italy, I understand the challenges of small spaces (we do not have big houses
                            Message 13 of 17 , Aug 6, 2009
                            • 0 Attachment
                              First off: this is the cutest house I have ever seen. Having grown up in Italy, I understand the challenges of small spaces (we do not have big houses either).
                              With regard to the karakumi dai, I always tell my students something very profound that Tada-sensei said to me at one time: learning how to do the karakumi structure on the karakumi dai is very easy and takes no time at all. Perfecting the technique and making your work look beautiful is what takes a great deal of time. That is true particularly if you are interested in making a traditional hirao.
                              By the way, one of the difficulty that many braiders have had in the past was to find the right type of silk for the karakumi dai. Finally, after long searches I was able to locate a resource in Japan that will make the silk specifically for me. As with any other stand, you can use any type of material on the karakumi dai, but if you are interested in achieving the beauty of traditional karakumi work (such as an hirao), you really need to use a special silk: it is thincker than kumihimo silk and has a very tight S twist. Shortly I will have white and 4 more colors available.
                              Giovanna

                              To: kumi2@yahoogroups.com
                              From: issumatuq@...
                              Date: Thu, 6 Aug 2009 17:35:15 -0400
                              Subject: Re: [kumi2] Re: Which braiding stand would you get?





















                              My there are so many different ideas! I love it.



                              Elisa I know that a duffle bag sounds small but I'm talking about a

                              130 square foot house. You can see one here if you are interested. http://www.tumbleweedhouses.com/houses/fencl/



                              There is not much space so everything must really be compacted. I have

                              a chance to try to live in one of these, for free.



                              I have no problem with the karakumidai being limited to one technique.

                              Personally I think you could spend quite a while perfecting technique.

                              I'd love to make a traditional hirao for example. I am sure that it

                              would take some time to perfect that.



                              Wonderful suggestions!






















                              _________________________________________________________________
                              Get back to school stuff for them and cashback for you.
                              http://www.bing.com/cashback?form=MSHYCB&publ=WLHMTAG&crea=TEXT_MSHYCB_BackToSchool_Cashback_BTSCashback_1x1

                              [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
                            • Anne Littlebird
                              It will be a lesson in downsizing. The idea is to save money to build one of my own and to find out what I REALLY need. I need craft things but not many. I
                              Message 14 of 17 , Aug 6, 2009
                              • 0 Attachment
                                It will be a lesson in downsizing. The idea is to save money to build
                                one of my own and to find out what I REALLY need. I need craft things
                                but not many. I have a square and a round marudai that obviously break
                                down small. All of the stands are wonderful in their own way but I
                                can't have them all. The karakumidai is so intriguing I might have to
                                succumb to it. Every time I see some of Makiko's work I sit fascinated
                                for hours.

                                Interesting about the thicker silk. Good to know.

                                Even if Daniel changes his mind I still want to get an even smaller
                                place.
                                On Aug 6, 2009, at 7:53 PM, giovanna imperia wrote:

                                >
                                > First off: this is the cutest house I have ever seen. Having grown
                                > up in Italy, I understand the challenges of small spaces (we do not
                                > have big houses either).
                                > With regard to the karakumi dai, I always tell my students something
                                > very profound that Tada-sensei said to me at one time: learning how
                                > to do the karakumi structure on the karakumi dai is very easy and
                                > takes no time at all. Perfecting the technique and making your work
                                > look beautiful is what takes a great deal of time. That is true
                                > particularly if you are interested in making a traditional hirao.
                                > By the way, one of the difficulty that many braiders have had in the
                                > past was to find the right type of silk for the karakumi dai.
                                > Finally, after long searches I was able to locate a resource in
                                > Japan that will make the silk specifically for me. As with any other
                                > stand, you can use any type of material on the karakumi dai, but if
                                > you are interested in achieving the beauty of traditional karakumi
                                > work (such as an hirao), you really need to use a special silk: it
                                > is thincker than kumihimo silk and has a very tight S twist. Shortly
                                > I will have white and 4 more colors available.
                                > Giovanna
                                >
                                >
                                > 5
                                > New Members
                                > Visit Your Group
                                > Share Photos
                                > Put your favorite
                                > photos and
                                > more online.
                                > Non Sibi
                                > Sed Patriae
                                > Support Navy Kids
                                > And Our Country
                                > Get in Shape
                                > on Yahoo! Groups
                                > Find a buddy
                                > and lose weight.
                                > .
                                >
                                >

                                Anne Littlebird
                                Issumatuq Herbals






                                [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
                              • none redmond
                                That s interesting Giovanna. I was wondering if the silk of the same thickness from treenways might do. But this is much more promising. Thanks for sharing. I
                                Message 15 of 17 , Aug 6, 2009
                                • 0 Attachment
                                  That's interesting Giovanna.
                                  I was wondering if the silk of the same thickness from treenways might
                                  do. But this is much more promising.
                                  Thanks for sharing.

                                  I learned a good deal from this exchange. maybe one of these fine days
                                  when I can bear to I should play with converting my takadai and play
                                  with the ayatakadai. I have never done that ! I am left wishing I
                                  could clone....

                                  None

                                  On Thursday, August 6, 2009, at 04:53 PM, giovanna imperia wrote:

                                  > �
                                  >
                                  > First off: this is the cutest house I have ever seen. Having grown up
                                  > in Italy, I understand the challenges of small spaces (we do not have
                                  > big houses either).
                                  > With regard to the karakumi dai, I always tell my students something
                                  > very profound that Tada-sensei said to me at one time: learning how to
                                  > do the karakumi structure on the karakumi dai is very easy and takes
                                  > no time at all. Perfecting the technique and making your work look
                                  > beautiful is what takes a great deal of time. That is true
                                  > particularly if you are interested in making a traditional hirao.
                                  > By the way, one of the difficulty that many braiders have had in the
                                  > past was to find the right type of silk for the karakumi dai. Finally,
                                  > after long searches I was able to locate a resource in Japan that will
                                  > make the silk specifically for me. As with any other stand, you can
                                  > use any type of material on the karakumi dai, but if you are
                                  > interested in achieving the beauty of traditional karakumi work (such
                                  > as an hirao), you really need to use a special silk: it is thincker
                                  > than kumihimo silk and has a very tight S twist. Shortly I will have
                                  > white and 4 more colors available.
                                  > Giovanna
                                  >
                                  > To: kumi2@yahoogroups.com
                                  > From: issumatuq@...
                                  > Date: Thu, 6 Aug 2009 17:35:15 -0400
                                  > Subject: Re: [kumi2] Re: Which braiding stand would you get?
                                  >
                                  > My there are so many different ideas! I love it.
                                  >
                                  > Elisa I know that a duffle bag sounds small but I'm talking about a
                                  >
                                  > 130 square foot house. You can see one here if you are interested.
                                  > http://www.tumbleweedhouses.com/houses/fencl/
                                  >
                                  > There is not much space so everything must really be compacted. I have
                                  >
                                  > a chance to try to live in one of these, for free.
                                  >
                                  > I have no problem with the karakumidai being limited to one technique.
                                  >
                                  > Personally I think you could spend quite a while perfecting technique.
                                  >
                                  > I'd love to make a traditional hirao for example. I am sure that it
                                  >
                                  > would take some time to perfect that.
                                  >
                                  > Wonderful suggestions!
                                  >
                                  >
                                  >
                                  >
                                  >
                                  >
                                  >
                                  >
                                  >
                                  >
                                  > __________________________________________________________
                                  > Get back to school stuff for them and cashback for you.
                                  > http://www.bing.com/
                                  > cashback?form=MSHYCB&publ=WLHMTAG&crea=TEXT_MSHYCB_BackToSchool_Cashbac
                                  > k_BTSCashback_1x1
                                  >
                                  > [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
                                  >
                                  >


                                  [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
                                • giovanna imperia
                                  For those of you who have taken workshops with Makiko Tada and had the opportunity to partake of her stash of old karakumi silk probably appreciate the
                                  Message 16 of 17 , Aug 7, 2009
                                  • 0 Attachment
                                    For those of you who have taken workshops with Makiko Tada and had the opportunity to partake of her stash of old karakumi silk probably appreciate the difference between it and any other substitute. Treenway has beautiful silk. However, the twist is much softer and will not yield the same results. In fact, the reason why I do not have the karakumi silk yet is because I have been going back and forth with the Japanese supplier on the proper twist. They are getting there and we are very close to being able to dye it. Yeah!.
                                    Giovanna

                                    > To: kumi2@yahoogroups.com
                                    > From: chinski@...
                                    > Date: Thu, 6 Aug 2009 20:18:13 -0700
                                    > Subject: Re: [kumi2] Re: Which braiding stand would you get?
                                    >
                                    > That's interesting Giovanna.
                                    > I was wondering if the silk of the same thickness from treenways might
                                    > do. But this is much more promising.
                                    > Thanks for sharing.
                                    >
                                    > I learned a good deal from this exchange. maybe one of these fine days
                                    > when I can bear to I should play with converting my takadai and play
                                    > with the ayatakadai. I have never done that ! I am left wishing I
                                    > could clone....
                                    >
                                    > None
                                    >
                                    > On Thursday, August 6, 2009, at 04:53 PM, giovanna imperia wrote:
                                    >
                                    > >
                                    > >
                                    > > First off: this is the cutest house I have ever seen. Having grown up
                                    > > in Italy, I understand the challenges of small spaces (we do not have
                                    > > big houses either).
                                    > > With regard to the karakumi dai, I always tell my students something
                                    > > very profound that Tada-sensei said to me at one time: learning how to
                                    > > do the karakumi structure on the karakumi dai is very easy and takes
                                    > > no time at all. Perfecting the technique and making your work look
                                    > > beautiful is what takes a great deal of time. That is true
                                    > > particularly if you are interested in making a traditional hirao.
                                    > > By the way, one of the difficulty that many braiders have had in the
                                    > > past was to find the right type of silk for the karakumi dai. Finally,
                                    > > after long searches I was able to locate a resource in Japan that will
                                    > > make the silk specifically for me. As with any other stand, you can
                                    > > use any type of material on the karakumi dai, but if you are
                                    > > interested in achieving the beauty of traditional karakumi work (such
                                    > > as an hirao), you really need to use a special silk: it is thincker
                                    > > than kumihimo silk and has a very tight S twist. Shortly I will have
                                    > > white and 4 more colors available.
                                    > > Giovanna
                                    > >
                                    > > To: kumi2@yahoogroups.com
                                    > > From: issumatuq@...
                                    > > Date: Thu, 6 Aug 2009 17:35:15 -0400
                                    > > Subject: Re: [kumi2] Re: Which braiding stand would you get?
                                    > >
                                    > > My there are so many different ideas! I love it.
                                    > >
                                    > > Elisa I know that a duffle bag sounds small but I'm talking about a
                                    > >
                                    > > 130 square foot house. You can see one here if you are interested.
                                    > > http://www.tumbleweedhouses.com/houses/fencl/
                                    > >
                                    > > There is not much space so everything must really be compacted. I have
                                    > >
                                    > > a chance to try to live in one of these, for free.
                                    > >
                                    > > I have no problem with the karakumidai being limited to one technique.
                                    > >
                                    > > Personally I think you could spend quite a while perfecting technique.
                                    > >
                                    > > I'd love to make a traditional hirao for example. I am sure that it
                                    > >
                                    > > would take some time to perfect that.
                                    > >
                                    > > Wonderful suggestions!
                                    > >
                                    > >
                                    > >
                                    > >
                                    > >
                                    > >
                                    > >
                                    > >
                                    > >
                                    > >
                                    > > __________________________________________________________
                                    > > Get back to school stuff for them and cashback for you.
                                    > > http://www.bing.com/
                                    > > cashback?form=MSHYCB&publ=WLHMTAG&crea=TEXT_MSHYCB_BackToSchool_Cashbac
                                    > > k_BTSCashback_1x1
                                    > >
                                    > > [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
                                    > >
                                    > >
                                    >
                                    >
                                    > [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
                                    >
                                    >
                                    >
                                    > ------------------------------------
                                    >
                                    > Yahoo! Groups Links
                                    >
                                    >
                                    >

                                    _________________________________________________________________
                                    Get free photo software from Windows Live
                                    http://www.windowslive.com/online/photos?ocid=PID23393::T:WLMTAGL:ON:WL:en-US:SI_PH_software:082009

                                    [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
                                  • Steve Pretty
                                    It s true that the karakumidai is traditionally used for making the karakumi braid structure - but this stand also makes a useful general purpose braiding
                                    Message 17 of 17 , Aug 7, 2009
                                    • 0 Attachment
                                      It's true that the karakumidai is traditionally used for making the karakumi braid structure - but this stand also makes a useful general purpose braiding stand. I have used mine to make samples of some of the Andean structures described in Noemi Speiser's manual of braiding.
                                      The stand offers a braid clamp to support the fell and take up completed braid. The pegs and the bobbins help organise the warp ends. I have made these stands for some people who have problems with arthritis in their hands and they find they struggle to work with free ends, but can still braid on this stand OK.

                                      I have added a file "how to make a Chinese braid on the karakumidai" to the files section of this site. This shows one possible approach of using the karakumidai to make a simple braid, taken from a fingerweaving text, on the stand. Basically I have treated the stand a bit like a braiding disk, numbering the slots, and showing how to move the warp ends between slots to make the braid. This is not at all the traditional way of using the Stand, but I hope it illustrates my point about the versatility of the stand.

                                      Regards

                                      Steve
                                    Your message has been successfully submitted and would be delivered to recipients shortly.