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longer braids

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  • Berlinbraids@cs.com
    One way to add on to thread length to make longer braids is as follows: (I hope it makes sense to you) Use doubled threads on each bobbin, the maximum length
    Message 1 of 16 , Sep 1, 2004
      One way to add on to thread length to make longer braids is as follows: (I
      hope it makes sense to you)
      Use doubled threads on each bobbin, the maximum length that you can wind on
      successfully. Attach the cut ends to the leader thread. When you have braided
      to the end of the length, you have a loop, through which you can pass another
      doubled thread, again with the cut ends tied on to the leader thread. Hey
      presto - no knots. You might see a tiny blip but if you stagger the ends some,
      you''ll find it works.

      This assumes that you are using leader threads (which adds several inches on
      to your braid right there) and that you use a release-able "knot" to tie on to
      your leader threads.

      Don't discount knitting stores as a source for good and useful yarns. There
      is a lot of mercerised stranded cotton out there just now and if you enlist the
      help of the owner or interested sales person, sometimes they have interesting
      balls or cones stashed away at the back. Our advantage as braiders is that
      dye lots or missing ball bands aren't usually a problem. I love to use ribbon
      yarn, acrylic or nylon, that was popular a while back and often find bargains.
      I'm presently in Holland and finding some great new yarn sources using the
      Yellow Pages. It's also a useful way to see some new towns!
      Shirley


      [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
    • Rachel Hardy
      ... I ve even found that chenille is great for braids, especially combined with knitting ribbon. Rachel Hardy also from Holland
      Message 2 of 16 , Sep 1, 2004
        > Don't discount knitting stores as a source for good and useful yarns.

        I've even found that chenille is great for braids, especially combined
        with knitting ribbon.

        Rachel Hardy
        also from Holland
      • Denise Kinsley
        ... Sounds pretty! But doesn t it make a very loose braid? Being a new braider, I have yet to experiment with a variety of materials. So far I have used
        Message 3 of 16 , Sep 1, 2004
          --- Rachel wrote:
          > I've even found that chenille is great for braids, especially
          > combined with knitting ribbon.

          Sounds pretty! But doesn't it make a very loose braid? Being a new
          braider, I have yet to experiment with a variety of materials. So
          far I have used only DMC cotton floss, but will soon be ordering some
          biron and eventually silk. Several people have recommended knitting
          ribbon for braiding, but again I have to wonder what sort of braid
          results from less than smooth strands. I guess there is only one way
          for me to find out, eh? ;-)

          Denise in Kent, WA
        • Denise Kinsley
          ... That would be great, Rachel. Thanks! I think the idea of a fuzzy braid is fun. Sure beats knitting with chenille! LOL I have some lovely chenille yarn
          Message 4 of 16 , Sep 1, 2004
            --- Rachel wrote:
            > No it doesn't. If I combine the two, chenille and knitting
            > ribbon, it results in a firm but furry braid. I'll try and
            > get a photo up on the group page.

            That would be great, Rachel. Thanks! I think the idea of a fuzzy
            braid is fun. Sure beats knitting with chenille! LOL I have some
            lovely chenille yarn that I was going to use for weaving, and now I
            just may have to snag a bit of it for braid play...

            Don't have any knitting ribbon on hand, since I have never cared for
            the resulting knitted fabric. The ribbon itself is very pretty,
            though, and I have always wanted to use it for something. Sounds
            like a perfect excuse for stash enhancement to me <g>.

            Denise in Kent, WA
          • RBlau
            re: chenille-- ... Remember that chenille is a lot of fuzz around a very fine core. It shouldn t produce a loose braid. I d look for weavers chenille at
            Message 5 of 16 , Sep 1, 2004
              re: chenille--
              >But doesn't it make a very loose braid?

              Remember that chenille is a lot of fuzz around a very fine core. It
              shouldn't produce a loose braid. I'd look for weavers' chenille at about
              1300-1450 ypp, not knitters' chenille, which tends to be bulkier. Webs
              (http://www.yarn.com/) has 1450 ypp chenille in lots of great colors if you
              don't have a weaving supply store near you.

              Ruth
            • Jan
              ... HHuummmm, what type of ribbon yarn? Eros?? How about regular satin ribbon, the kind you find on spools at the fabric store? Weaver s Chenille... HHuummmm
              Message 6 of 16 , Sep 1, 2004
                At 04:17 PM 9/1/2004 +0000, you wrote:

                >Don't have any knitting ribbon on hand, since I have never cared for
                >the resulting knitted fabric. The ribbon itself is very pretty,
                >though, and I have always wanted to use it for something. Sounds
                >like a perfect excuse for stash enhancement to me <g>.
                >
                >Denise in Kent, WA

                HHuummmm, what type of ribbon yarn? Eros?? How about regular satin
                ribbon, the kind you find on spools at the fabric store?

                Weaver's Chenille... HHuummmm so many possibilities.... and I do have a
                weaving store here. It's very small because they also have spinning
                supplies and knitting supplies but I do seem to remember seeing lots of
                different Chenille.

                I'm off to the craft store today to get a 10 inch round and possible a
                square (for variety and for flat braids) to add to my Maru Dai... maybe
                some more wooden bobbins till I can justify getting the gorgeous real
                Tama. At this rate, I better get some more sand paper, too!

                One of the other ladies in the SCA and I were talking about spray painting
                the PVC part silver or gold... or something to hide the fact that it's
                plastic and there's a spray paint that bonds with plastic so....
                Hhhuuummmmmmmmm

                Oh, for those wondering how I came up with the idea for the single pole for
                my Maru Dai..... this is what I fell in love with and what I truly want to
                have. The price is daunting, though.
                :( http://www.firesidelooms.com/marudai.html

                Jan / Katrine

                [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
              • Janis Saunders
                Hi Denise, The density of your braids depend on the counter weight for each particular braid. Here is a quick project for you to see how the counter weight
                Message 7 of 16 , Sep 1, 2004
                  Hi Denise,

                  The density of your braids depend on the counter weight for each particular
                  braid.

                  Here is a quick project for you to see how the counter weight affects braids.

                  Set up your favorite braid with some floss, a yard will be fine. Put so
                  much weight in the counter weight bag that the tama just barely counter it.
                  Braid for 8 inches or so and then take out most of the counter weight until
                  the bag barely counters the tama. Braid another 8 inches. You will see that
                  the more counter weight the longer each float in the braid and the more
                  open the braid. Less counter weight makes for a much stiffer braid as the
                  floats are much closer together. For the last 8 inches balance the counter
                  weight as you usually do.

                  Different textured threads and yarns will make the surface look different
                  but it is the relationship between the counter weight and the tama that
                  make the braid loose or tight.

                  Janis

                  At 03:08 PM 9/1/2004 +0000, you wrote:
                  >--- Rachel wrote:
                  > > I've even found that chenille is great for braids, especially
                  > > combined with knitting ribbon.
                  >
                  >Sounds pretty! But doesn't it make a very loose braid? Being a new
                  >braider, I have yet to experiment with a variety of materials. So
                  >far I have used only DMC cotton floss, but will soon be ordering some
                  >biron and eventually silk. Several people have recommended knitting
                  >ribbon for braiding, but again I have to wonder what sort of braid
                  >results from less than smooth strands. I guess there is only one way
                  >for me to find out, eh? ;-)
                  >
                  >Denise in Kent, WA
                  >
                  >
                  >
                  >
                  >
                  >Yahoo! Groups Links
                  >
                  >
                  >
                  >
                • Rachel Hardy
                  ... No it doesn t, I used 70 grammes tama and standard half weight for the counterweight. If I combine the two, chenille and knitting ribbon, it results in a
                  Message 8 of 16 , Sep 1, 2004
                    On Wed, 2004-09-01 at 15:08, Denise Kinsley wrote:
                    > --- Rachel wrote:
                    > > I've even found that chenille is great for braids, especially
                    > > combined with knitting ribbon.
                    >
                    > Sounds pretty! But doesn't it make a very loose braid?


                    No it doesn't, I used 70 grammes tama and standard half weight for the
                    counterweight. If I combine the two, chenille and knitting ribbon, it
                    results in a firm but furry braid. I'll try and get a photo up on the
                    group page.

                    Rachel
                    Holland
                  • Denise Kinsley
                    ... Beautiful braid, Rachel. Thank you! ... I do have several cones of weaving (i.e. fine) chenille, along with several skeins of gorgeous handpainted
                    Message 9 of 16 , Sep 1, 2004
                      --- Rachel wrote:
                      > I've uploaded the photo, the ribbon is also space-dyed

                      Beautiful braid, Rachel. Thank you!


                      > This was knitting chenille, no problems, but it is quite fine,
                      > not the really chunky chenille.

                      I do have several cones of weaving (i.e. fine) chenille, along with
                      several skeins of gorgeous handpainted chenille. I knit with the
                      bulky chenille only once -- and that was enough <g>. I looked like
                      an overweight polar bear in that sweater, and it confirmed my
                      suspicion that I am strictly a fine gauge knitter. No telephone pole
                      needles for me! LOL

                      Denise in Kent, WA
                    • Denise Kinsley
                      ... I do understand the relationship of counter weight to tama weight, and Rodrick s video has an excellent example of this in a spiral braid. What I was
                      Message 10 of 16 , Sep 1, 2004
                        --- Janis wrote:
                        > The density of your braids depend on the counter weight for
                        > each particular braid.

                        I do understand the relationship of counter weight to tama weight,
                        and Rodrick's video has an excellent example of this in a spiral
                        braid. What I was concerned about is the fact that chenille is fuzzy
                        and ribbon bunches up when twisted, and I didn't think they would
                        work up into a very solid braid.

                        The pictures I've seen in Jacqui Carey's more advanced books of
                        braids like this seem rather loose. But it's hard to tell for sure
                        without touching them; perhaps the photos are misleading? I love the
                        idea of using textured / tactile elements like fuzzy chenille or
                        sparkly beads. Must have been a hussy in a previous life! LOL

                        The exercise you described does sound interesting, and I will try it
                        at some point. Even though I understand the concept, seeing it in
                        person (so to speak) will reinforce the lesson.

                        Denise in Kent, WA
                      • Rachel Hardy
                        Do we ever need a real excuse for stash enhancement?!?! I mean, anything that qualifies as fiber needs to be bought, don t you think? I ve uploaded the photo,
                        Message 11 of 16 , Sep 1, 2004
                          Do we ever need a real excuse for stash enhancement?!?! I mean, anything
                          that qualifies as fiber needs to be bought, don't you think?

                          I've uploaded the photo, the ribbon is also space-dyed, I really love
                          the effect, I used 3 different colors of chenille that complemented the
                          ribbon. This was knitting chenille, no problems, but it is quite fine,
                          not the really chunky chenille.

                          Rachel


                          On Wed, 2004-09-01 at 16:17, Denise Kinsley wrote:
                          > --- Rachel wrote:
                          > > No it doesn't. If I combine the two, chenille and knitting
                          > > ribbon, it results in a firm but furry braid. I'll try and
                          > > get a photo up on the group page.
                          >
                          > That would be great, Rachel. Thanks! I think the idea of a fuzzy
                          > braid is fun. Sure beats knitting with chenille! LOL I have some
                          > lovely chenille yarn that I was going to use for weaving, and now I
                          > just may have to snag a bit of it for braid play...
                          >
                          > Don't have any knitting ribbon on hand, since I have never cared for
                          > the resulting knitted fabric. The ribbon itself is very pretty,
                          > though, and I have always wanted to use it for something. Sounds
                          > like a perfect excuse for stash enhancement to me <g>.
                          >
                          > Denise in Kent, WA
                        • Janis Saunders
                          Hi Denise, Sample, sample, sample!!! I know that this is a dirty word for some, we all work in our own way but sampling does help quite a bit. A disk is a good
                          Message 12 of 16 , Sep 1, 2004
                            Hi Denise,

                            Sample, sample, sample!!! I know that this is a dirty word for some, we all
                            work in our own way but sampling does help quite a bit. A disk is a good
                            way to sample although I am not sure how well the chenille will behave in
                            the slots.

                            Janis

                            At 06:19 PM 9/1/2004 +0000, you wrote:
                            >--- Janis wrote:
                            > > The density of your braids depend on the counter weight for
                            > > each particular braid.
                            >
                            >I do understand the relationship of counter weight to tama weight,
                            >and Rodrick's video has an excellent example of this in a spiral
                            >braid. What I was concerned about is the fact that chenille is fuzzy
                            >and ribbon bunches up when twisted, and I didn't think they would
                            >work up into a very solid braid.
                            >
                            >The pictures I've seen in Jacqui Carey's more advanced books of
                            >braids like this seem rather loose. But it's hard to tell for sure
                            >without touching them; perhaps the photos are misleading? I love the
                            >idea of using textured / tactile elements like fuzzy chenille or
                            >sparkly beads. Must have been a hussy in a previous life! LOL
                            >
                            >The exercise you described does sound interesting, and I will try it
                            >at some point. Even though I understand the concept, seeing it in
                            >person (so to speak) will reinforce the lesson.
                            >
                            >Denise in Kent, WA
                            >
                            >
                            >
                            >
                            >
                            >Yahoo! Groups Links
                            >
                            >
                            >
                            >
                          • RBlau
                            ... It will probably lose some (or a lot) of its fuzz. Ruth
                            Message 13 of 16 , Sep 1, 2004
                              >although I am not sure how well the chenille will behave in
                              >the slots.

                              It will probably lose some (or a lot) of its fuzz.

                              Ruth
                            • Denise Kinsley
                              ... LOL! Not at all. Kumihimo requires relatively little yarn / thread and the setup time is minimal. I have even come to enjoy making sample swatches for
                              Message 14 of 16 , Sep 1, 2004
                                --- Janis wrote:
                                > Sample, sample, sample!! I know that this is a dirty word for some

                                LOL! Not at all. Kumihimo requires relatively little yarn / thread
                                and the setup time is minimal. I have even come to enjoy making
                                sample swatches for my knitting. I admit to being rather goal
                                oriented <g> and will gnerally not make tons of samples "just for
                                fun" -- but if I am learning something meaningful to me then it is
                                time well spent.

                                Denise in Kent, WA
                              • Todd Rich
                                On Tue, 31 Aug 2004 ZadadeGDH@aol.com wrote: (snip) ... I got it from Fabric Dragon , who s website is http://www.fabricdragon.com I used the stranded silk
                                Message 15 of 16 , Sep 3, 2004
                                  On Tue, 31 Aug 2004 ZadadeGDH@... wrote:
                                  (snip)
                                  >
                                  > And Torin where did you get that black and red silk floss you were using on
                                  > the "Leaf" braid at War.
                                  >
                                  I got it from 'Fabric Dragon', who's website is
                                  http://www.fabricdragon.com I used the stranded silk floss.

                                  > Remind Sandy I want to see that neon pastel knarlly yarn braid with the
                                  > bells...
                                  >
                                  She says that it has already gone on to it's final destination >:) You'll
                                  have to talk to Olwyn about it now.

                                  > Zada
                                  > reading thru Owen's Making Kumihimo bok now that I can relax after vacation

                                  Ok, jumping on this post to talk about the bobbins too. I know there are
                                  several people on here who just joined from Pennsic who saw the bobbins I
                                  was using. They are injection molded plastic with sealed steel cores for
                                  weights. The people who make them, (The Maretti's who own the Filamenti
                                  mentioned in the suppliers in Rodrick's Braids book) are probably going to
                                  be selling the molds to make them to me in a few months. I'll have to
                                  look at the costs, but they are likely to run $4-5.50 apiece depending on
                                  weight and how many get bought at a time. I'll let people know if I do
                                  get them.
                                  Todd
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