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Re: [kumi2] silk cord question

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  • A.G. Lindsay
    Well, if you re using glass beads, they can eventually cut through the silk (or cotton) cord. I always thought not using it was a matter of durability. --lin
    Message 1 of 7 , Mar 31, 2012
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      Well, if you're using glass beads, they can eventually cut through the silk (or cotton) cord. I always thought not using it was a matter of durability.

      --lin

      On Mar 31, 2012, at 10:32 PM, Merrie wrote:

      > I have been told not to use silk thread or cord as it will not work well with the japanese or any beads. Does everyone agree with this. New at this. thanks
    • Wheat
      ... Well, yes, both If you choose a thread or cord that is too thick for the opening int he bead, you should to use it. On the other hand, if you choose a
      Message 2 of 7 , Apr 1 5:47 AM
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        > I have been told not to use silk thread or cord as it will not work
        > well with the japanese or any beads. Does everyone agree with this.
        > New at this. thanks
        >

        Well, yes, both <G>

        If you choose a thread or cord that is too thick for the opening int he
        bead, you should to use it.

        On the other hand, if you choose a thread or cord that will hole in the
        bead it will be fine.

        BeadSmith, Griffin and Gudebrod (and others) all come in different
        weights (thickness, grist, diameter)

        Its all about choosing appropriate materials to begin with and some of
        that comes with experiementation and taking some time to learn about the
        different properties (do not get me started on Kevlar )

        Enjoy the Making

        Wheat




        >
        > Merrie
        >
        >


        --
        *Read: Wheat Wrote What http://www.WheatCarr.com
        Shop: ItsAllJustString http://www.ItsAllJustString.com *


        [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
      • GPB
        Sorry Wheat, Ok, I understand about the hole size between bead and threading material. That doea make since. Maybe that s what they were talking about. I
        Message 3 of 7 , Apr 1 10:48 AM
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          Sorry Wheat,
          Ok, I understand about the hole size between bead and threading material. That doea make since. Maybe that's what they were talking about. I just hope they didn't say straight out that you could use beads on silk. That's like my ex quilting instructor telling the class that quilts are only made with 100% cotton. I don't take her class anymore.

          And I love ranting (per se). You can learn a few things if you listen carefully between the ranting and raving...(smile!).

          So tell me, what about Kevlar...?

          Garnie


          --- In kumi2@yahoogroups.com, Wheat <wheat@...> wrote:
          > Its all about choosing appropriate materials to begin with and some of
          > that comes with experiementation and taking some time to learn about the
          > different properties (do not get me started on Kevlar )
          >
          > Enjoy the Making
          >
          > Wheat
          >
          >
          >
          >
          > >
          > > Merrie
          > >
          > >
          >
          >
          > --
          > *Read: Wheat Wrote What http://www.WheatCarr.com
          > Shop: ItsAllJustString http://www.ItsAllJustString.com *
          >
          >
          > [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
          >
        • Albert Abril
          The only thing I know about Kevlar, other than the obvious strength of it, is that it can be tough to tie a knot that holds. Kevlar likes to slip it self out
          Message 4 of 7 , Apr 1 12:02 PM
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            The only thing I know about Kevlar, other than the obvious strength of it, is that it can be tough to tie a knot that holds. Kevlar likes to slip it self out of knots.
            ----- Original Message -----
            From: GPB
            To: kumi2@yahoogroups.com
            Sent: Sunday, April 01, 2012 10:48 AM
            Subject: [kumi2] Re: Choosing Stringing Materials



            Sorry Wheat,
            Ok, I understand about the hole size between bead and threading material. That doea make since. Maybe that's what they were talking about. I just hope they didn't say straight out that you could use beads on silk. That's like my ex quilting instructor telling the class that quilts are only made with 100% cotton. I don't take her class anymore.

            And I love ranting (per se). You can learn a few things if you listen carefully between the ranting and raving...(smile!).

            So tell me, what about Kevlar...?

            Garnie

            --- In kumi2@yahoogroups.com, Wheat <wheat@...> wrote:
            > Its all about choosing appropriate materials to begin with and some of
            > that comes with experiementation and taking some time to learn about the
            > different properties (do not get me started on Kevlar )
            >
            > Enjoy the Making
            >
            > Wheat
            >
            >
            >
            >
            > >
            > > Merrie
            > >
            > >
            >
            >
            > --
            > *Read: Wheat Wrote What http://www.WheatCarr.com
            > Shop: ItsAllJustString http://www.ItsAllJustString.com *
            >
            >
            > [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
            >





            [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
          • destinationvenus1
            Not only that, but kevlar is self-abraiding, which means that if two pieces cross each other they can cut each other. Not a good quality in a braiding
            Message 5 of 7 , Apr 1 2:26 PM
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              Not only that, but kevlar is self-abraiding, which means that if two pieces cross each other they can cut each other. Not a good quality in a braiding material.

              Carolyn

              --- In kumi2@yahoogroups.com, "Albert Abril" <aabril1@...> wrote:
              >
              > The only thing I know about Kevlar, other than the obvious strength of it, is that it can be tough to tie a knot that holds. Kevlar likes to slip it self out of knots.
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