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Overpowered or not?

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  • Hung Vu
    Almost everything I read recently about kitesurfing seems to indicate that the nirvana of kitesurfing is to ride in overpowered conditions or to go big or
    Message 1 of 43 , Dec 8, 2000
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      Almost everything I read recently about kitesurfing seems to indicate
      that the "nirvana" of kitesurfing is to ride in overpowered conditions
      or "to go big or go home".

      While I had my share of being in overpowered conditions (e.g. used an
      11.5 Naish in 30+ knots - remember I am only 125 lbs) I am not quite
      sure being overpowered is useful for learning or even for times when one
      is not well prepare to be overpowered (not in shape, beginning of
      season, crowded beach, etc.)

      Sometimes, an advance kitesurfer could get hurt easily by making a
      small, simple mistake in overpowered conditions (e.g. I cut my hand -
      need 4 stiches - after a bad landing - and almost broke my ankle - in
      the summer doing 20 - 30' jumps with my 5.5 in 25+ knots).

      Should a beginner be in an overpowered condition before he/she knows how
      to handle it?

      With the "standardization" of 30 m lines, most kitesurfers tend to
      forget about 40+ m lines. It could be easier to learn in slightly
      underpowered conditions with 40+ m lines than being overpowered with 30
      m line...

      Hung.
    • Mel
      ... I don t see how that would relate to MelMods. It IS harder in lighter wind, & this tendency is increased by the strap being lengthened for more power in
      Message 43 of 43 , Apr 12 11:08 PM
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        k man <fernmanus@...> wrote:

        > Mel,
        >
        > Maybe my problem was that I didn't build the rig
        > properly. I put it together last summer and I had a
        > difficult time getting my 15.5 to flip over when it
        > was lying on the leading edge.

        I don't see how that would relate to MelMods. It IS harder in lighter wind,
        & this tendency is increased by the strap being lengthened for more power in
        those light winds (same with the stock system). If you set up your
        adjustment strap to give extended low wind range, you have to remember to
        readjust it prior to attempting a nose down relaunch. MelMods do prevent
        you from being able to pull the bar back over your head before thrusting it
        forward & swimming a few strokes to slacken the lines (so the kite rolls
        onto its back), but you can still use the technique (which is needed in
        really light winds anyway) of just pulling in a bit on the center
        strap/leader & releasing it.

        > I gave up on it at
        > that time. Maybe I should give it another try. Are
        > you selling a commercial version yet of the Melmod?

        No. I see little need since it's so easy to build yourself, with no tools,
        from readily available supplies.

        Mel
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