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An "old" New Wave

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  • Hung Vu
    I just bought a used 4.9 New Wave mainly for winter (I don t want to crash my expensive Naish AR5s on ice). The weather is too cold for kitesurfing and too
    Message 1 of 6 , Dec 2, 2000
      I just bought a used 4.9 New Wave mainly for winter (I don't want to
      crash my expensive Naish AR5s on ice). The weather is too cold for
      kitesurfing and too warm for kitesnowboarding so I decided to give the
      "old" New Wave a try on land (in around 8 - 12 knots range).

      I was a bit surprised to discover that the New Wave has probably one of
      the most sophisticated bridal system I have seen. The bridal allows for
      tuning of almost "anything" one can think of.

      First the famous Concept Air VSS system that allow for tuning the Angle
      of Attack of the kite works very well. I don't think any other foils or
      kites except 4 line inflatable has this feature. The tuning of the AOA
      is static, this means that one selects the AOA before launching the
      kite. I will give a dynamic adjustment AOA system a though (I don't
      think it is hard to make this adjustable with an extra line - the 4th
      line).

      Second, the power steering system allows for fast turning of the kite
      using only the front lines (by connecting the trailing edge bridal to
      the front line bridal; this system is somewhat similar to the Jojo Wet)

      Third, the power control by adjusting the trailing edge of the kite
      (using the third line) works very well. This would make the New Wave
      has more range than the regular foil and probably up to 3/4 the range of
      the AR5. This trailing edge control and the dynamic AOA system may make
      the New Wave have more range than the AR5? Until I can build a working
      dynamic AOA adjustment system, I will probably not fully understand the
      impact of having both systems together... However, one think I know for
      sure that the more control I have over the AOA and the shape of the
      kite, the more efficient I can fly it for a particular condition... I
      will keep everyone update as I progress through my winter
      kitesnowboarding season...

      The New Wave is not a beginner kite as I have thought, I would rate it
      anywhere between an AR5 and a high performance foil (the New Wave is not
      as stable as an AR5 and with the AOA set low, it seems to fly faster
      than an AR5)

      The safety release system works fine and the relaunching (on land) is
      quick and easy (like any foil)

      After having flown a number of inflatables, Kite Ski, closed cell foils
      and now the New Wave, it more or less confirm my conclusion that in
      extreme light wind (5 knots range) a high performance open cell foil (or
      maybe a C-Quad - I don't know yet) is the only choice..... (open cell
      foils do water-relaunch - maybe 50% - as long as one knows what to do at
      the appropriate moment)

      Hung.
    • kiteboard@aol.com
      In a message dated 00-12-02 17:56:59 EST, Hung Vu writes:
      Message 2 of 6 , Dec 3, 2000
        In a message dated 00-12-02 17:56:59 EST, Hung Vu writes:

        << I know for
        sure that the more control I have over the AOA and the shape of the
        kite, the more efficient I can fly it for a particular condition.... >>

        This makes complete sense. Just like adjustable outhaul & downhaul on a
        sailboard (or sailboat for that matter!).

        << in
        extreme light wind (5 knots range) a high performance open cell foil (or
        maybe a C-Quad - I don't know yet) is the only choice >>

        What leads you to believe an OPEN cell foil would be better than a closed
        cell? (you actually didn't mention if you'd even tried any open)

        Mel
      • Hung Vu
        ... My XXXL is an open cell foil. I had it for 2 seasons now. I also had a Kitesurfer XXL closed cell and found that it does not fly as well as the open cell
        Message 3 of 6 , Dec 3, 2000
          kiteboard@... wrote:
          > << in
          > extreme light wind (5 knots range) a high performance open cell foil (or
          > maybe a C-Quad - I don't know yet) is the only choice >>
          >
          > What leads you to believe an OPEN cell foil would be better than a closed
          > cell? (you actually didn't mention if you'd even tried any open)

          My XXXL is an open cell foil. I had it for 2 seasons now. I also had a
          Kitesurfer XXL closed cell and found that it does not fly as well as the
          open cell XXXL in very light wind.

          Of all the kites I used so far only the XXXL (an open cell foil) can fly
          properly when the wind get within the 5 knots range (the other types of
          kite may fly too but you'll never know when they will just fall off the
          sky like the inflatables, drift-back and fall down like the closed cell
          foil and the Kite Ski).

          (I have heard - from Mark? - that the C-Quad can fly properly in very
          little wind too)

          Hung.
        • kiteboard@aol.com
          In a message dated 12/3/00 4:44:08 PM Pacific Standard Time, hungvu@netcom.ca writes:
          Message 4 of 6 , Dec 3, 2000
            In a message dated 12/3/00 4:44:08 PM Pacific Standard Time, hungvu@...
            writes:

            << My XXXL is an open cell foil. I had it for 2 seasons now. I also had a
            Kitesurfer XXL closed cell and found that it does not fly as well as the
            open cell XXXL in very light wind. >>

            You're sure it's not just the size making the difference?

            << (I have heard - from Mark? - that the C-Quad can fly properly in very
            little wind too) >>

            Jeff Quick has been a big C-Quad fan too, hailing from light wind San Diego.

            Mel
          • Hung Vu
            ... That s what I thought until I tried the New Wave 4.9. Both the XXL (7.1 m2) and the 4.9 New Wave behave very similar when the wind drops to around 5 knots
            Message 5 of 6 , Dec 3, 2000
              kiteboard@... wrote:
              >
              > In a message dated 12/3/00 4:44:08 PM Pacific Standard Time, hungvu@...
              > writes:
              >
              > << My XXXL is an open cell foil. I had it for 2 seasons now. I also had a
              > Kitesurfer XXL closed cell and found that it does not fly as well as the
              > open cell XXXL in very light wind. >>
              >
              > You're sure it's not just the size making the difference?

              That's what I thought until I tried the New Wave 4.9. Both the XXL (7.1
              m2) and the 4.9 New Wave behave very similar when the wind drops to
              around 5 knots range (I could say the smaller New Wave is slightly
              better - the New Wave has more openings than the XXL)

              The only reason I can think off is that a closed cell foil retain the
              internal pressure even though the wind drop. By retaining the internal
              pressure, a closed cell foil also retain its maximum weight (pressure
              air is much heavier than air) even though the wind can no longer sustain
              such weight. When a closed cell foil start to drift back, it probably
              loose its optimum aerodynamic position and will drift down faster unless
              the wind pick up.

              An open cell kite will be just hovering right there on the sky to wait
              for the wind to come back up.

              If I have to rate very light wind kites (5 - 10 knots) following would
              be my rating:
              1- Open cell foil (as I can relaunch it sometimes and chance of
              recovering from a collapse is 80-90% - just put things in proper
              perspectives, when an inflatable start to collapse or stall, there is NO
              WAY to recover)
              2- C-Quad (I am not sure a bout its relauncheability, how to pack it
              and chance of recovering after a collapse or stall - Mark and Jeff may
              be able to tell us more here)
              3- Closed cell foil
              4- Inflatable (the smaller the tubes the better - less pressure air,
              less heavy duty fabric)
              5- Kite Ski

              Hung.
            • Dave Raue
              ... From: To: Sent: Sunday, December 03, 2000 7:56 PM Subject: Re: [ksurfschool] An old New Wave ...
              Message 6 of 6 , Dec 4, 2000
                ----- Original Message -----
                From: <kiteboard@...>
                To: <ksurfschool@egroups.com>
                Sent: Sunday, December 03, 2000 7:56 PM
                Subject: Re: [ksurfschool] An "old" New Wave


                > In a message dated 12/3/00 4:44:08 PM Pacific Standard Time,
                hungvu@...
                > writes:
                >
                > << My XXXL is an open cell foil. I had it for 2 seasons now. I also had
                a
                > Kitesurfer XXL closed cell and found that it does not fly as well as the
                > open cell XXXL in very light wind. >>
                >
                > You're sure it's not just the size making the difference?

                FWIW, I've flown both and and open-vent XL too and don't think it's size.
                The XL will fly in v low wind, it just doesn't generate any power. I think
                the KS quadrifoils inflate too slowly, in fact they seem to have a hard time
                getting fully inflated at all. A limp foil works about as well as....
                well, you get the picture.

                -D
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