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Re: [ksurfschool] Re: Newbie

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  • chandler@gunderlandmarine.com
    Thanks David and Phil, More of us out there than I thought. It seems safety is the big message I am getting from everyone. I am taking lessons next week with
    Message 1 of 16 , Jun 12 1:49 PM
      Thanks David and Phil,

      More of us out there than I thought. It seems safety is the
      big message I am getting from everyone. I am taking lessons
      next week with a PASA certified school and I am certain the
      relative safety issues will be addressed. I will let you know
      how the lessons go.

      Thanks again y'all.

      Bob Beach
    • Tom Rolf
      Speaking of safety, Rick has done the kite community a great service, in compiling a collection of what can go wrong. Better to learn from a vicarious
      Message 2 of 16 , Jun 12 3:13 PM
        Speaking of safety, Rick has done the kite community a great service,
        in compiling a collection of what can go wrong.
        Better to learn from a vicarious accident, rather than the real thing.

        -------- Original Message --------
        Subject: [ksurf] LATEST SAFE KITEBOARDING GUIDELINES
        Date: Thu, 12 Jun 2003 10:43:13 -0400
        From: "Rick Iossi" <flkitesurfer@...>
        Reply-To: kitesurf@yahoogroups.com
        To: fksa@yahoogroups.com, kitesurf@yahoogroups.com



        The latest updated Safe Kiteboarding Guidelines appear below. These
        guidelines have been derived from accident/incident analysis of over 100
        cases and are intended to reduce accidents, incidents and complaints that
        might threaten kiteboarding access. This latest version includes special
        emphasis on acting while there is still time to DEPOWER your kite.
        Kiteboarding is a potentially dangerous sport and regardless of what
        procedures are or are not followed, injury may still occur. Be careful out
        there. These guidelines and a lot of other ideas appear in the KSR located
        at:

        http://groups.yahoo.com/group/kitesurf/files/KSR%20-%20KITEBOARDING%20SAFETY%20REFERENCES/


        SAFE KITEBOARDING GUIDELINES ? June 12, 2003

        These safe kiteboarding guidelines have been prepared to attempt to improve
        kiteboarder and bystander safety. These procedures have been derived from
        other guidelines from around the world and from lessons learned from actual
        accidents and incidents. Kiteboarding can be potentially dangerous both to
        the rider and to bystanders, particularly if practiced without adequate
        training, safety gear, knowledge and caution. Riders must accept that even
        if these guidelines are followed that accidents, incidents and/or injury may
        occur in the "extreme sport" of kiteboarding. Kiteboarders should follow
        these guidelines, area specific guidelines if applicable and other prudent
        and safe practices in an attempt to maintain safety and continued access to
        beaches for kiteboarding. Using good judgment is key to kiteboarding safely.
        These guidelines are updated regularly so please check the FKA website for
        the latest version.

        GENERAL SAFETY GUIDELINES

        1. Readily help other riders with launching and landing. Whether you are
        starting out or are almost a pro, your help may avoid a serious
        incident/accident and possible restrictions. Get involved with your local
        association or club and with area riders to try to preserve access to
        kiteboard. Riders are solely responsible for their safety and that of
        effected bystanders. If you are new to an area or visiting, seek out local
        kiteboarders, shops and/or associations for local guidelines and rules
        before riding.

        2. All kiteboarders, particularly beginners should seek adequate
        professional instruction. Beginners must avoid crowded areas as most
        bystanders aren't aware the potential hazards. Beginners should body drag
        out at least 300 ft. (60m) from shore prior to water starting and should
        always stay out of guarded or restricted beach areas.

        3. Know your equipment?s limitations as well as your own. If you aren't 100%
        healthy OR IN DOUBT, DON?T FLY! Always maintain an energy reserve while out
        kiteboarding. Hydrate regularly and wear adequate exposure clothing to deal
        with extended time in the water. Don?t kiteboard alone or further from shore
        than you are readily able to swim in from.

        4. Make sure you have proper safety equipment, i.e. a tested, well
        maintained kite depowering leash attached to your body, a good well fitting
        helmet, impact vest, gloves, whistle and hook knife. Rigging a frequently
        tested, well maintained and reliable chicken loop or centerline quick
        release should be carefully considered.

        5. Give way to the public on the beach and in the water at ALL TIMES. Be
        courteous and polite to bystanders. Complaints have led to restrictions on
        kiteboarding in some areas.

        6. Is the weather acceptable, free of storm clouds and excessive gusty
        winds? If storm clouds are moving in, land and disable your kite well in
        advance of any change in wind or temperature. Consider organizing an alert
        air horn and flag signal for your launch as a warning to riders of pending
        unstable weather. Are seas and wind condition within your experience,
        ability and appropriate for your gear? Offshore and onshore winds should be
        avoided. REMEMBER: TWICE THE WIND ? FOUR TIMES THE POWER!

        7. If despite all precautions you are lofted AND have time to react, depower
        your kite at the earliest possible time and ideally before being lofted and
        still offshore, away from hard objects. Multiple gusts can hit over a short
        period and you may be lofted a second or third time, so ACT to depower your
        kite as soon as you can.

        PREFLIGHT CHECKLIST

        1. Make sure your launch is open, FREE OF DOWNWIND BYSTANDERS, hard objects,
        nearby power lines, buildings and walls, within at least 100 ft. (30 m), and
        preferably 200 ft. (60 m) or more. Avoid kiteboarding near airports and in
        low flight path areas.

        2. Check to see what size kite other kiteboarders are rigging and get their
        input on conditions. Do not rig too large a kite for conditions and
        carefully consider advice of more experienced riders. Failure to act on
        prudent advice has cost some riders very dearly.

        3. Check your kite for tears or leaky bladders. If you have leaky bladders
        or tears in your kite, repair them before flying.

        4. Check ALL lines, webbing, pigtails, bridles, the chicken loop and leaders
        for knots, wear or abrasions. If the line sheathing shows any breaks,
        replace them. The pigtails should be replaced no less frequently than every
        6 months on inflatable kites.

        5. Make sure your flying lines are equal as they will stretch unevenly with
        use. If they have knots that can?t be easily untied, replace your flight
        lines.

        6. Solo launching and landing are NOT recommended. If solo launching make
        sure your kite is properly anchored with a substantial quantity of sand and
        is draped downwind to avoid premature launch. Rig your kite for solo launch
        at the last minute and launch without delay AFTER CAREFUL PREFLIGHTING as
        serious accidents have happened in only minutes during this stage. If you
        leave the kite unattended, disabled by disconnecting all lines from one side
        and roll your lines when not in use.

        7. Walk down your lines and examine them carefully. Just before launch pick
        your bar up and carefully look down the lines for twists and tangles that
        could cause the kite to be dangerously uncontrollable. While you are holding
        your bar up look down the lines, shake your bar to make sure the center
        lines are connected to the leading edge of the kite. Be particularly
        careful, slow and methodical in high winds. Multiple, careful preflighting
        in higher winds are advised.

        LAUNCHING AND GETTING UNDERWAY

        1. Avoid hooking or snap shackling in while onshore or near hard objects.
        CONSIDER LAUNCHING AND LANDING "UNHOOKED" or not connected to your chicken
        loop. Pull in your trim strap or rope entirely or to a point that will allow
        stable kite flight with existing wind conditions, to properly depower the
        kite before launching and so that you can readily hold the bar and release
        it if necessary. Physically and mentally rehearse managing emergency
        situations including just "letting go" of your bar.

        2. Announce your intention to launch and then launch promptly. In many cases
        the kite should be launched towards or preferably from the water. Assisted
        launches are always preferred.

        3. To try to avoid lofting or involuntary lifting. DO NOT BRING YOUR KITE
        much above 20 degrees off of the surface, within 200 ft. (60 m) of ANY HARD
        OBJECT (on water or land). NEVER BRING YOUR KITE TO THE VERTICAL WITHIN THIS
        200 ft., preferably more, of hard objects.

        4. Go offshore at least 300 ft. WITHOUT DELAY after launch. Stay beyond 300
        ft. until time to come in. If there are substantial waves where you need to
        put on your board consider body dragging outside the breaker zone first. Be
        aware of and properly react in advance of low flying aircraft coming into
        your area.

        5. Yield the right of way to all others in the water. Riders must yield to
        others when jumping, maneuvering, or riding on port tack (left hand
        forward). Kiteboarders should not jump within a buffer zone of at least two
        hundred feet (60 m) of others and objects that are downwind. Incoming riders
        give way to those launching.

        6. All kiteboarders are encouraged to master body dragging to facilitate
        board recovery. Use of a board leash may prove to be hazardous to the rider
        due to board rebound. Wearing a helmet is always advised but a helmet may
        not provide adequate projection against board impact as the boards can and
        have violently hit any part of the rider.

        7. If you are in the water for an extended period of time, frequently signal
        that you are "OK" to the shore by placing one hand on your head, palm down
        for ten or more seconds every 15 to 20 minutes to try to avoid an
        unnecessary rescue attempt.

        LANDING

        1. Approach the shore slowly with caution. Take care to avoid causing an
        accidental jump in well powered conditions by slowing suddenly while
        approaching the shore. Keep your kite low (ideally within 20 ft. of the
        surface), to try avoid lofting.

        2. Arrange for assisted landings at least 200 ft. (60 m) from bystanders,
        power lines and vertical surfaces. Do not use non-kiteboarders for assisted
        launches or landings. Use mutually understood, hand and voice signals to
        improve launch and landing safety. IF IN ANY DOUBT, ALWAYS SAFELY SOLO
        DEPOWER your kite in the shallows well away from shore and bystanders and
        swim in.

        3. Properly anchor your kite, disconnect and wind up your kite lines. The
        kite should be placed in a safe area well out of bystander and vehicular
        traffic.

        © FKA, Inc. 2002,2003

        LOCAL KITEBOARDING GUIDELINES FOR ______________________________
        (e.g. necessary area specific precautions and restrictions )
        1.

        2.

        3.

        An example follows:

        LOCAL KITEBOARDING GUIDELINES FOR BOCA RATON, FL

        The following guidelines have been prepared to aid kiteboarding safety and
        access privileges at the City of Boca Raton Beach in the vicinity of Spanish
        River Blvd. These practices and other appropriate procedures should be
        followed while kiteboarding off this beach.

        1. New kitesurfers must seek adequate, proper instruction BEFORE or while
        kiteboarding here.

        2. Launch and land north of lifeguard stand #20 located due east of Spanish
        River Blvd. No launching or landing is permitted at guarded beaches.
        _________________
        FKA, Inc.
        transcribed by: Rick Iossi

        Promote "Ride Hard & Safer, Ten Ideas..." PRESERVE YOUR ACCESS TO RIDE
        http://www.kiteforum.com/phpBB/viewtopic.php?topic=3881&forum=3&4

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        [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
      • Kite Power (Sydney)
        G day Bob I would love to come over however I am not a big fan of sitting on planes to far away countries when I have only explored probably less than 10% of
        Message 3 of 16 , Jun 12 7:28 PM
          G'day Bob

          I would love to come over however I am not a big fan of sitting on planes to far away countries when I have only explored probably less than 10% of Oz's kiteboarding spots.
          I have heard your area is really good though but tends to get only lighter winds is that correct? If it is then they are good conditions for those with slightly worn out bodies! :-)
          Sounds like you are on the right track to get into and enjoy kiteboarding safely.
          Have fun.
          Cya and
          Goodwinds
          Steve McCormack
          http://www.kitepower.com.au

          ----- Original Message -----
          From: chandler@...
          To: ksurfschool@yahoogroups.com
          Sent: Friday, June 13, 2003 12:10 AM
          Subject: Re: [ksurfschool] Re: Newbie


          Thank you Steve for your comments and especially the safety
          tips. I have been flying a training kite for some time now it
          is an Air Rush 2.0 and have acquired the basic skills. Great
          to hear from someone so far away; I am in Corpus Christi,
          Texas on the Gulf of Mexico, great sailing places- come see
          us.

          Bob Beach

          Yahoo! Groups Sponsor





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          [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
        • rakolowich
          I just returned from Kauai and saw this sport in its purest form for the first time. Mind you I have seen people here in the Bay Area (S.F.) participating too.
          Message 4 of 16 , Aug 21, 2003
            I just returned from Kauai and saw this sport in its purest form for
            the first time.
            Mind you I have seen people here in the Bay Area (S.F.) participating
            too. It
            looks fantastic. I want to learn this and become good at it. Here is
            my situation
            and what I would like is advice on how to begin this persuit:

            First of all I am 54 years old. 6'1" and 220 lbs. I am not a physical
            fitness nut
            but I am also not a couch potatoe. I fly kites (on the land). I have
            about 6-8
            kites that include 2 and 4 line stunt kites, parafoils and even a
            Revolution (my
            favorite). So I know the kite flying skills well. I have not tried
            any 'traction' kites
            but my parafoils are almost identical. When I was young I was an
            excellent
            waterskier. I have never been very good at surfing but given the
            right
            conditions I can have fun.

            So I live in the SF Bay Area where there is lots of sailboarding and
            as I
            mentioned I see kiteboarders too. What recommendations can you all
            give me
            on getting started in this sport? Is there a school here or ? I
            taught myself river
            kayaking from books and visualization ( blew my instructors mind that
            I was
            able to complete my roll the first time). I also would like to
            purchase some
            equipment. I don't stay in the learning to take baby steps role for
            very long but
            I also don't need the latest Ferrari either. So I would like to find
            a set of
            equipment that will allow me to learn but to also serve a fast
            learning curve in
            skill development. Used or new? Is the equipment aging or ? I
            remember
            seeing sailboarding take off. The first boards were like tanks
            compared to
            todays boards. If I buy used equipment how far back in time can you
            go
            without being caught driving the latest Edsel?

            So to review:

            1. Learning process.
            2. Equipment
            3. Am I kidding myself at my age?

            Thanks
          • Kite Power (Sydney)
            G day No you are not kidding yourself! You can do it for sure especially since you have a lot of skills with a kite, especially Revs! But, this sport can kill
            Message 5 of 16 , Aug 22, 2003
              G'day
              No you are not kidding yourself! You can do it for sure especially since you have a lot of skills with a kite, especially Revs!
              But, this sport can kill you, unlike the kite flying you are used to, it is not for everyone, the forces involved are massive, and every honest kiter will admit that the kites power demands respect/fear!
              GET LESSONS, you are taking a huge risk to yourself and anyone downwind of you if you even attempt to fly a suitable sized kite without tuition. Try to get a lesson from an IKO trained instructor.
              Go to a kite shop if possible, one that was around before kiteboarding began, that has staff that kitesurf, if not go to a windsurf/kiteshop, and seek out the staff that actually kite.
              If they are casual about kite leashes, and safety shop elsewhere.
              Kites from the major brands, made since 2001, are all pretty good, and there are a lot of closeout deals around.
              Avoid buying used except from reputable shops, avoid kites that have untidy looking repairs in the bladders.
              The sport is 80%+ kite flying skill, so it does not matter one bit that you have never surfed. Wear a helmet and flotation/impact vest at all times while learning.
              Cya and
              Goodwinds
              Steve McCormack
              http://www.kitepower.com.au


              ----- Original Message -----
              From: rakolowich
              To: ksurfschool@yahoogroups.com
              Sent: Friday, August 22, 2003 10:43 AM
              Subject: [ksurfschool] Newbie


              I just returned from Kauai and saw this sport in its purest form for
              the first time.
              Mind you I have seen people here in the Bay Area (S.F.) participating
              too. It
              looks fantastic. I want to learn this and become good at it. Here is
              my situation
              and what I would like is advice on how to begin this persuit:

              First of all I am 54 years old. 6'1" and 220 lbs. I am not a physical
              fitness nut
              but I am also not a couch potatoe. I fly kites (on the land). I have
              about 6-8
              kites that include 2 and 4 line stunt kites, parafoils and even a
              Revolution (my
              favorite). So I know the kite flying skills well. I have not tried
              any 'traction' kites
              but my parafoils are almost identical. When I was young I was an
              excellent
              waterskier. I have never been very good at surfing but given the
              right
              conditions I can have fun.

              So I live in the SF Bay Area where there is lots of sailboarding and
              as I
              mentioned I see kiteboarders too. What recommendations can you all
              give me
              on getting started in this sport? Is there a school here or ? I
              taught myself river
              kayaking from books and visualization ( blew my instructors mind that
              I was
              able to complete my roll the first time). I also would like to
              purchase some
              equipment. I don't stay in the learning to take baby steps role for
              very long but
              I also don't need the latest Ferrari either. So I would like to find
              a set of
              equipment that will allow me to learn but to also serve a fast
              learning curve in
              skill development. Used or new? Is the equipment aging or ? I
              remember
              seeing sailboarding take off. The first boards were like tanks
              compared to
              todays boards. If I buy used equipment how far back in time can you
              go
              without being caught driving the latest Edsel?

              So to review:

              1. Learning process.
              2. Equipment
              3. Am I kidding myself at my age?

              Thanks


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