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Overpowered on a Directional

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  • slstuder
    I am looking for some advice about staying in control in stronger winds. I am about 155lbs riding a Naish 6 6 directional with an AR5 9.5 kite. When the wind
    Message 1 of 6 , Apr 22, 2002
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      I am looking for some advice about staying in control in stronger
      winds. I am about 155lbs riding a Naish 6'6" directional with an AR5
      9.5 kite. When the wind starts gusting in the low 20's I have a hard
      time holding an edge and preventing one of those downwind out of
      control runs.

      Based on what I've read, I try to head upwind by keeping the kite low
      (say 20 to 30 degrees above the water) and edging hard to get the
      kite
      to the forward edge of the window. What usually happens is, even in
      that position, the kite keeps pulling like a train. Flying in the
      chicken loop and sheeting out helps but I still find I am having to
      fight the whole time to stay in control.

      I don't have a problem with expending a bit of effort (nobody said it
      was an easy sport) but it seems like most other riders (more
      experienced than me no doubt) are using bigger kites and riding in a
      much more relaxed manner and not struggling to stay in control.

      Is the technique I described incorrect? Is there a better way to
      control board speed in this situation. I'm interested to hear what
      other peoples experiences are.

      Also, would riding a smaller bi-directional board make controlling
      speed any easier?

      Any advice appreciated.

      Stephan
    • Mike Soultanian
      I m only a beginner, but what I noticed while riding this weekend was that I was able to edge alot better when I was in the hard loop. That way I could really
      Message 2 of 6 , Apr 22, 2002
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        I'm only a beginner, but what I noticed while riding this weekend was
        that I was able to edge alot better when I was in the hard loop. That
        way I could really sit back and not have the weight of the kite on my
        arms (if I'm in the chicken loop). If I ever got into a gust I just
        popped the hard loop off and continued in the chicken loop...

        However, I'm on a wipika apocolypse 148 so it's considerably smaller :)

        MIke

        slstuder wrote:
        >
        > I am looking for some advice about staying in control in stronger
        > winds. I am about 155lbs riding a Naish 6'6" directional with an AR5
        > 9.5 kite. When the wind starts gusting in the low 20's I have a hard
        > time holding an edge and preventing one of those downwind out of
        > control runs.
        >
        > Based on what I've read, I try to head upwind by keeping the kite low
        > (say 20 to 30 degrees above the water) and edging hard to get the
        > kite
        > to the forward edge of the window. What usually happens is, even in
        > that position, the kite keeps pulling like a train. Flying in the
        > chicken loop and sheeting out helps but I still find I am having to
        > fight the whole time to stay in control.
        >
        > I don't have a problem with expending a bit of effort (nobody said it
        > was an easy sport) but it seems like most other riders (more
        > experienced than me no doubt) are using bigger kites and riding in a
        > much more relaxed manner and not struggling to stay in control.
        >
        > Is the technique I described incorrect? Is there a better way to
        > control board speed in this situation. I'm interested to hear what
        > other peoples experiences are.
        >
        > Also, would riding a smaller bi-directional board make controlling
        > speed any easier?
        >
        > Any advice appreciated.
        >
        > Stephan
        >
        >
        > If you are new to kitesurfing, please visit
        > http://www.KitesurfingSchool.org/faqs.htm for the answers
        > to the most frequently asked questions.
        >
        > To unsubscribe, please send an email to ksurfschool-unsubscribe@egroups.com
        > To subscribe, please send an email to ksurfschool-subscribe@egroups.com
        >
        >
        > Your use of Yahoo! Groups is subject to http://docs.yahoo.com/info/terms/
      • Dwight & Jacky
        You are very skilled to hold that much wind on a huge board. You should be on a 4 10 directional, twin tip, or wakeboard. Dwight
        Message 3 of 6 , Apr 22, 2002
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          You are very skilled to hold that much wind on a huge board. You should be on a 4'10 directional,
          twin tip, or wakeboard.

          Dwight


          > I am looking for some advice about staying in control in stronger
          > winds. I am about 155lbs riding a Naish 6'6" directional with an AR5
          > 9.5 kite. When the wind starts gusting in the low 20's I have a hard
          > time holding an edge and preventing one of those downwind out of
          > control runs.
          >
          > Based on what I've read, I try to head upwind by keeping the kite low
          > (say 20 to 30 degrees above the water) and edging hard to get the
          > kite
          > to the forward edge of the window. What usually happens is, even in
          > that position, the kite keeps pulling like a train. Flying in the
          > chicken loop and sheeting out helps but I still find I am having to
          > fight the whole time to stay in control.
          >
          > I don't have a problem with expending a bit of effort (nobody said it
          > was an easy sport) but it seems like most other riders (more
          > experienced than me no doubt) are using bigger kites and riding in a
          > much more relaxed manner and not struggling to stay in control.
          >
          > Is the technique I described incorrect? Is there a better way to
          > control board speed in this situation. I'm interested to hear what
          > other peoples experiences are.
          >
          > Also, would riding a smaller bi-directional board make controlling
          > speed any easier?
          >
          > Any advice appreciated.
          >
          > Stephan
          >
          >
          >
          > If you are new to kitesurfing, please visit
          > http://www.KitesurfingSchool.org/faqs.htm for the answers
          > to the most frequently asked questions.
          >
          > To unsubscribe, please send an email to ksurfschool-unsubscribe@egroups.com
          > To subscribe, please send an email to ksurfschool-subscribe@egroups.com
          >
          >
          > Your use of Yahoo! Groups is subject to http://docs.yahoo.com/info/terms/
          >
          >
          >
        • Philip
          Stephan, I smaller twin tip would make a big difference in holding an edge. Being centered more on the board and having a good edge to work will amaze you!
          Message 4 of 6 , Apr 22, 2002
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            Stephan,

            I smaller twin tip would make a big difference in holding an edge. Being
            centered more on the board and having a good edge to work will amaze
            you!
            Being able to hold the Board you have near 20kts is impressive as it is!
            I would look at a board like the Slingshot Jarvis, Cabrinha Prankster
            and Bic AirFlow 162 they have all been getting great response from my
            customers.

            Let me know what questions you have.,

            Philip

            Philip Mann
            Inland Sea Windsurf Co.
            http://www.inlandsea.com
            Kitesite.net
            http://www.kitesite.net
            toll free 888-465-2632



            -----Original Message-----
            From: slstuder [mailto:slstuder@...]
            Sent: Monday, April 22, 2002 2:04 PM
            To: ksurfschool@yahoogroups.com
            Subject: [ksurfschool] Overpowered on a Directional


            I am looking for some advice about staying in control in stronger
            winds. I am about 155lbs riding a Naish 6'6" directional with an AR5
            9.5 kite. When the wind starts gusting in the low 20's I have a hard
            time holding an edge and preventing one of those downwind out of
            control runs.

            Based on what I've read, I try to head upwind by keeping the kite low
            (say 20 to 30 degrees above the water) and edging hard to get the kite
            to the forward edge of the window. What usually happens is, even in
            that position, the kite keeps pulling like a train. Flying in the
            chicken loop and sheeting out helps but I still find I am having to
            fight the whole time to stay in control.

            I don't have a problem with expending a bit of effort (nobody said it
            was an easy sport) but it seems like most other riders (more
            experienced than me no doubt) are using bigger kites and riding in a
            much more relaxed manner and not struggling to stay in control.

            Is the technique I described incorrect? Is there a better way to
            control board speed in this situation. I'm interested to hear what
            other peoples experiences are.

            Also, would riding a smaller bi-directional board make controlling
            speed any easier?

            Any advice appreciated.

            Stephan



            If you are new to kitesurfing, please visit
            http://www.KitesurfingSchool.org/faqs.htm for the answers
            to the most frequently asked questions.

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          • Philip
            I agree with Dwight. You got Skills! Philip Mann Inland Sea Windsurf Co. http://www.inlandsea.com Kitesite.net http://www.kitesite.net toll free 888-465-2632
            Message 5 of 6 , Apr 22, 2002
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              I agree with Dwight. You got Skills!

              Philip Mann
              Inland Sea Windsurf Co.
              http://www.inlandsea.com
              Kitesite.net
              http://www.kitesite.net
              toll free 888-465-2632



              -----Original Message-----
              From: Dwight & Jacky [mailto:fishersfort@...]
              Sent: Monday, April 22, 2002 4:45 PM
              To: ksurfschool@yahoogroups.com
              Subject: Re: [ksurfschool] Overpowered on a Directional


              You are very skilled to hold that much wind on a huge board. You should
              be on a 4'10 directional, twin tip, or wakeboard.

              Dwight


              > I am looking for some advice about staying in control in stronger
              > winds. I am about 155lbs riding a Naish 6'6" directional with an AR5
              > 9.5 kite. When the wind starts gusting in the low 20's I have a hard
              > time holding an edge and preventing one of those downwind out of
              > control runs.
              >
              > Based on what I've read, I try to head upwind by keeping the kite low
              > (say 20 to 30 degrees above the water) and edging hard to get the kite
              > to the forward edge of the window. What usually happens is, even in
              > that position, the kite keeps pulling like a train. Flying in the
              > chicken loop and sheeting out helps but I still find I am having to
              > fight the whole time to stay in control.
              >
              > I don't have a problem with expending a bit of effort (nobody said it
              > was an easy sport) but it seems like most other riders (more
              > experienced than me no doubt) are using bigger kites and riding in a
              > much more relaxed manner and not struggling to stay in control.
              >
              > Is the technique I described incorrect? Is there a better way to
              > control board speed in this situation. I'm interested to hear what
              > other peoples experiences are.
              >
              > Also, would riding a smaller bi-directional board make controlling
              > speed any easier?
              >
              > Any advice appreciated.
              >
              > Stephan
              >
              >
              >
              > If you are new to kitesurfing, please visit
              > http://www.KitesurfingSchool.org/faqs.htm for the answers to the most
              > frequently asked questions.
              >
              > To unsubscribe, please send an email to
              > ksurfschool-unsubscribe@egroups.com
              > To subscribe, please send an email to
              ksurfschool-subscribe@egroups.com
              >
              >
              > Your use of Yahoo! Groups is subject to
              > http://docs.yahoo.com/info/terms/
              >
              >
              >



              If you are new to kitesurfing, please visit
              http://www.KitesurfingSchool.org/faqs.htm for the answers
              to the most frequently asked questions.

              To unsubscribe, please send an email to
              ksurfschool-unsubscribe@egroups.com
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            • Kitepower
              G day Stephan We are a similar weight and have identical names, you must be a good guy! ... I never really enjoyed kiteboarding until I got onto small boards,
              Message 6 of 6 , Apr 23, 2002
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                G'day Stephan
                We are a similar weight and have identical names, you must be a good guy!
                :-)
                I never really enjoyed kiteboarding until I got onto small boards, because I
                really disliked the out of control downwind with the kite up high trying to
                regain control, and the theory of keeping the kite low and edging hard works
                up to a certain point then it gets dangerous to your feet and legs as you
                are ripped over the front of your board by trying to edge against a strong
                gust with a low kite.
                Your problem is the board, it is simply too big for you in those stronger
                winds, so unless you can put on a lot of weight and strength quickly, just
                get a smaller board.
                If you want to stick with directionals, there are a lot of good ones around,
                like the Naish Flash 4'10" and Mutants, E-Boards,
                http://www.e-boards.com.au/boards.asp check out the Flirt 1.47
                If you want to go to a TT, then Naish, Underground, E-Boards all make TT's
                small enough to suit you. You would do best on a board around 140 to 150cm
                long.

                I now ride TT's only after learning on big directionals, I can control my
                speed right through to overpowered conditions, jumping is easy and landings
                are easier too.
                Try to get a loan of or a demo of a smaller board?

                Cya and
                Goodwinds
                Steve McCormack
                http://www.kitepower.com.au
                mailto:sydney@...
                126 Beach St, Coogee, NSW, Australia 2034
                Open 7 Days 9.30 - 5.30
                Also at 386 Latrobe Terrace Geelong Vic
                mailto:geelong@...

                -----Original Message-----
                From: slstuder [mailto:slstuder@...]
                Sent: Tuesday, 23 April 2002 7:04
                To: ksurfschool@yahoogroups.com
                Subject: [ksurfschool] Overpowered on a Directional


                I am looking for some advice about staying in control in stronger
                winds. I am about 155lbs riding a Naish 6'6" directional with an AR5
                9.5 kite. When the wind starts gusting in the low 20's I have a hard
                time holding an edge and preventing one of those downwind out of
                control runs.

                Based on what I've read, I try to head upwind by keeping the kite low
                (say 20 to 30 degrees above the water) and edging hard to get the
                kite
                to the forward edge of the window. What usually happens is, even in
                that position, the kite keeps pulling like a train. Flying in the
                chicken loop and sheeting out helps but I still find I am having to
                fight the whole time to stay in control.

                I don't have a problem with expending a bit of effort (nobody said it
                was an easy sport) but it seems like most other riders (more
                experienced than me no doubt) are using bigger kites and riding in a
                much more relaxed manner and not struggling to stay in control.

                Is the technique I described incorrect? Is there a better way to
                control board speed in this situation. I'm interested to hear what
                other peoples experiences are.

                Also, would riding a smaller bi-directional board make controlling
                speed any easier?

                Any advice appreciated.

                Stephan


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                If you are new to kitesurfing, please visit
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                to the most frequently asked questions.

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