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Re: [ksurfschool] Kiteskiing questions

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  • Hung Vu
    Paul, Without snow, use small sand bags or any other weights (empty wind shield washer bottle filled with water) to hold the trailing edge of the kite down.
    Message 1 of 4 , Mar 2, 2002
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      Paul,

      Without snow, use small sand bags or any other weights (empty wind
      shield washer bottle filled with water) to hold the trailing edge of the
      kite down.

      The other the option is to screw a ice screw in the ice, unwind your
      lines and wrap your brake lines around the ice screw before open up your
      kite.

      P.S., In all cases, the kite is always set up in a read-to-fly position
      (e.g., trailing edge toward the wind, vent upward/toward the sky, bridle
      upward/toward the wind.

      Hung.

      paul.v.brown@... wrote:
      >
      > Hello all
      >
      > I bought a Peel 5.0 quad-line, with the intent to take it out on the ice and ski with it. My previous kite experience is actually quite limited I think, compared to many others. I have only flown 2-liners up til now, the most powerful of which was my Flexifoil - I think it's a 6'.
      >
      > Given the incredible simplicity of the Flexifoil setup, I am somewhat dismayed by the Peel, and the 4-line concept.
      >
      > I've opened it up inside several times and "figured out" the bridle system, but have yet to actually fly the thing.
      >
      > Recently conditions were IMHO *perfect*, and I went out on the ice. There was only a moderate wind, but very steady, and there was basically *no snow* on the lake. I was alone, and time was against me, as this was after work, and the sun was quickly on its way down, but I thought if I could even get in 15 minutes worth, that would be better than nothing.
      >
      > My actual question is: HOW ON EARTH do you get set up? I started to unbundle the kite, and while I got one half of it unrolled and straightened out, the other half starts blowing around, even though my (relatively light) shoe was on top of it.
      >
      > Naturally the story continues that as I try to straighten one side, the other side blows around, and the lines start looking like so much spaghetti. At this point I haven't even BEGUN to think about unravelling my flying lines. Much less getting THEM staightened out, untangled, tied on to the kite, tied on to the handles, etc....
      >
      > Do I just need to break down and try and make some friends, or what? =o)
      >
      > Even if I were on dry land, I can't imagine the process being a whole lot easier -- seems like when I tried to read about this "they" said to set up the kite and put snow on the leading edge. Trouble is, I don't even know which way to set up the kite in the first place. My best guess is that you lay it out on the ground in front of you so that the side of the kite with the bridle attached to it is facing the sky, the top (leading edge??) of the kite is away from you, and the bottom (where the brake lines are attached) of the kite is towards you. OR is the kite supposed to be facedown with the top of the kite towards you? (That's more the way I set up the Flexifoil.)
      >
      > Yeah, I'd like to practice this a few times on dry land first, but my problem is that living in Finland, I've got ALL THESE DAMN TREES everywhere, and I can't seem to find a HUGE open field anywhere that wouldn't have trees lining it, screwing up my wind.
      >
      > The only open areas around where I live seem to be the lakes, so for all intents and purposes the *frozen* version *is* dry land for me.
      >
      > Anyway, thanks for any help you can give me...
      >
      > BTW, there is one other guy who lives in the same town as me who has a kite of some sort, but he claims to be about as newbie as I am, so I'm sure any advice would be great. And yeah, I have read the kitesurfingschool's bits on kiteskiing - just seems like this setup part sorta gets skipped over. If it's not, and I just missed it, let me know.
      >
      > -paul
      >
      >
      >
      >
      > Your use of Yahoo! Groups is subject to http://docs.yahoo.com/info/terms/
    • hink_trent
      ... It is better to have the lines and handles already attached to the kite when you are trying to launch on ice. The trick with handles is to put them
      Message 2 of 4 , Mar 3, 2002
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        --- In ksurfschool@y..., <paul.v.brown@n...> wrote:
        > My actual question is: HOW ON EARTH do you get set up?

        It is better to have the lines and handles already attached to the
        kite when you are trying to launch on ice.

        The trick with handles is to put them together, wind just the brake
        lines around them for 5-8 turns, then start winding all the lines
        around them. This sets the lines so that the brakes are applied to to
        kite. Keep winding until you get to the end of the bridles. use your
        knee to hold the kite down by the trailing egde, scoop up the
        bridles, throw them on top of the kite and then take each wing tip
        and fold it towards the center. fold the outside deges towards the
        center one or two more times so that the kite looks like a strip of
        fabric with the ends of the bridles and the handles sticking out of
        the bottom. Take the handles and place them near the leading edge of
        the kite so that the lines are still taught going into the trailing
        edge of the kite. then start rolling the trailing edge of the kite
        up taking the line and handles with it 'till you get to the leading
        edge.

        When you wind lines around handles you have to unwind them exactly
        the same way otherwise you will get all kinds of twists in the line.
        when winding AND unwinding, I always hold the tops of my handles in
        my right hand with the bottoms pointing towards my left hand and then
        wind the line around the bottom of the handles with my left hand.

        With the kite packed in the manner described above it is possible to
        just unroll the kite and spread it face up. with the brakes already
        applied the kite should inflate and just sit there while you
        carefully unwind the lines. In practice the kite may take off in a
        gust and spin a few twists in the lines. The kite won't pull to hard
        because the brakes are applied. You can just twist the handles to get
        the twists out before you unwrap the last bit of brake lines and
        prepare to launch.

        It is easier to launch the kite by weighting down the trailing edge
        so the kite can't take off and put twists in the lines. Sometimes we
        use a plastic snow fence, hay bale, or duffel bag to park the kite
        against when landing and launching - this is especially helpful in
        stronger winds.
      • hink_trent
        The method I describe is for open-cell foils. with your valved foils launching may require that you pre-inflate the foil. ... to ... hard ... get
        Message 3 of 4 , Mar 3, 2002
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          The method I describe is for open-cell foils. with your valved foils
          launching may require that you pre-inflate the foil.

          --- In ksurfschool@y..., "hink_trent" <hink_trent@y...> wrote:
          > With the kite packed in the manner described above it is possible
          to
          > just unroll the kite and spread it face up. with the brakes already
          > applied the kite should inflate and just sit there while you
          > carefully unwind the lines. In practice the kite may take off in a
          > gust and spin a few twists in the lines. The kite won't pull to
          hard
          > because the brakes are applied. You can just twist the handles to
          get
          > the twists out before you unwrap the last bit of brake lines and
          > prepare to launch.
          >
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