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for a beginner: directional board?

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  • Andy Sewell
    I’m planning on buying some equipment, to start Kitesurfing. Since there’s no such thing as rental equipment, the local instructor said to buy the
    Message 1 of 2 , Jun 21, 2000
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      I’m planning on buying some equipment, to start Kitesurfing. Since there’s
      no such thing as rental equipment, the local instructor said to buy the
      equipment first, then take two lessons on my own equipment, then I’ll be
      fine on my own.

      I’m an advanced expert windsurfer (100 days a year), (and have done lots of
      water skiing, snow skiing, but no wakeboarding or snowboarding).

      I have a very specific need in KiteSurfing. Because of the nature of my
      business, I can get away fairly often, but only on very short notice, so it’
      s very hard to lineup a buddy, do do a downwinder with a shuttle car, so I
      need to get out at the same spot where I launch. I know that staying upwind
      is more work (and less fun). Therefore, I want the most “upwind-oriented”
      equipment I can find.

      I’ll be using an 11 meter kite, for 8-13 mph winds (my windsurfing gear
      picks up from there). I’m looking at buying the TwinTip Bat 164, since the
      impression I have is that this is the most upwind-oriented board out there.
      I was told that the 11 meter kite will work on a 7 foot directional, in 8-13
      mph. Do I reduce that to about 10 mph minimum wind, due to the smaller
      volume of the Bat, compared to the directional?

      Also, I’m told that a directional is a lot easier to learn on. What’s your
      opinion? Being an experienced windsurfer, I can envision gibing a
      directional is going to be a lot harder than a windsurfer, since you have no
      mast and boom, to help with control and balance, possibly making the Bat
      easier overall to learn on.
    • holl@powerup.com.au
      ... Being an experienced windsurfer, I can envision gibing a ... you have no ... the Bat ... I also come from a strong windsurfing background and have recently
      Message 2 of 2 , Jun 23, 2000
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        --- In ksurfschool@egroups.com, "Andy Sewell" <andy@f...> wrote:
        Being an experienced windsurfer, I can envision gibing a
        > directional is going to be a lot harder than a windsurfer, since
        you
        have no
        > mast and boom, to help with control and balance, possibly making
        the
        Bat
        > easier overall to learn on.


        I also come from a strong windsurfing background and have recently
        started kitesurfing. Learning how to waterstart and jibe has been
        much
        easier than I anticipated. I use a 3 strap unidirectional board. My
        second day on the water I was already doing some full planing jibes.
        I
        believe it is easier than on a sailboard as 1. the board is much
        smaller, therefore bounces less in chop and 2. the kite holds you up
        and takes your weight off the board, therefore the board does not
        stall as easily. If you can do a full planing jibe on a sailboard you
        will quickly learn how to do one on a kiteboard.

        If you only want to kiteboard in light winds then go for a big kite
        as
        everything is much harder when you're underpowered, especially going
        upwind.

        If you get a good video like "Kiteboarding how to rip" then you
        should
        be able to teach yourself without too much trouble. You don't need to
        spend lots of Dollars on multiple lessons (especially if in your area
        there are others that you can watch). With a little bit of time on
        the
        water it is quite easy to learn.

        Have fun !
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