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Jumping and kite locking

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  • Hung Vu
    It s common knowledge in kitesurfing that to jump, the wind must be strong enough (or the kite has to be big enough) for one to lock the kite in the forward
    Message 1 of 3 , Jan 4, 2002
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      It's common knowledge in kitesurfing that to jump, the wind must be
      strong enough (or the kite has to be big enough) for one to lock the
      kite in the forward moving direction (or a very small sine).

      Amazingly, the same jumping rule seem to apply for kiteskiing on snow or
      ice (even with much less wind and kite power).

      I haven't yet figured out why such coincidence. Anyone?

      Hung.
    • Mel
      ... Maybe that s the lower limit of kite total airspeed (real plus apparent) to make it turn back quickly enough to jump. Mel
      Message 2 of 3 , Jan 4, 2002
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        Hung Vu <hungvu@...> wrote:

        > It's common knowledge in kitesurfing that to jump, the wind must be
        > strong enough (or the kite has to be big enough) for one to lock the
        > kite in the forward moving direction (or a very small sine).
        >
        > Amazingly, the same jumping rule seem to apply for kiteskiing on snow or
        > ice (even with much less wind and kite power).
        >
        > I haven't yet figured out why such coincidence. Anyone?

        Maybe that's the lower limit of kite total airspeed (real plus apparent) to
        make it turn back quickly enough to jump.

        Mel
      • Hung Vu
        ... Sounds reasonable. Definitely it s the kite airspeed that counts and not the wind speed. I went out kiteskiing this afternoon towing my daughter. I could
        Message 3 of 3 , Jan 7, 2002
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          Mel wrote:
          >
          > Hung Vu <hungvu@...> wrote:
          >
          > > It's common knowledge in kitesurfing that to jump, the wind must be
          > > strong enough (or the kite has to be big enough) for one to lock the
          > > kite in the forward moving direction (or a very small sine).
          > >
          > > Amazingly, the same jumping rule seem to apply for kiteskiing on snow or
          > > ice (even with much less wind and kite power).
          > >
          > > I haven't yet figured out why such coincidence. Anyone?
          >
          > Maybe that's the lower limit of kite total airspeed (real plus apparent) to
          > make it turn back quickly enough to jump.

          Sounds reasonable. Definitely it's the kite airspeed that counts and not
          the wind speed.

          I went out kiteskiing this afternoon towing my daughter. I could jump
          alone but definitely not when I towed her (of course I did not try to
          jump while towing but felt I could not jump even if I wanted to).

          So the extra drag reduce the total airspeed of the kite and make it
          un-jumpable.

          Now we need to understand what is that "minimum" airspeed required for
          jumping...

          P.S., Kiteskiing is a great family sport... The kids just LOVE it; much
          more than going to the hills (due to kiteskiing non-stop action)...

          Hung.
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