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Re: All you want to know about boards!

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  • fernmanus@yahoo.com
    Hung, My opinion is different than yours. If I were to pick the best all around board I would select a large bidirectional board like the 169cm Wake-N-Style.
    Message 1 of 11 , Sep 4, 2001
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      Hung,

      My opinion is different than yours. If I were to pick the best all
      around board I would select a large bidirectional board like the
      169cm Wake-N-Style. My friend had a Clam Sandwich that we both rode
      many times. Once we tried the Wake-N-Style, we weren't interested in
      riding the Clam anymore. My friend sold his clam a little while
      ago. We now ride most of the time on pickleforks, but I still have a
      Litewave for light wind riding.

      For high wind riding, I prefer a kite specific board over a
      traditional wakeboard. I like the deeper rails on a kite specific
      board. I think they help the board track better when you are really
      powered up.

      Kenny

      --- In ksurfschool@y..., Hung Vu <hungvu@n...> wrote:
      > Having used extensively three different types of board from the very
      > large directional FOne 230, to the all around Clam Sandwich
      directional
      > 5'9" and then the 140 cm standard production wakeboard, here are my
      > thoughts on all of them:
      >
      > 1- The Clam Sandwich 5'9" is my best all-around board. If you only
      > want one board for all the conditions, select a directional board
      as
      > long as your height and as thin as a wakeboard.
      >
      > 2- The wakeboard is the best for fun. If you want a board to just
      > having fun sliding around or jumping then go for the wakeboard (1
      fin at
      > each end is fine - actually better). The only issue with the
      wakeboard
      > is that it reduces the lower wind range of your kite as much as 20%
      > (e.g., a kite normally delivers 10 - 20 knots wind range would only
      > deliver 12 - 20 knots wind range with the wakeboard) while not
      really
      > extends the upper wind range (compared to the Clam Sandwich)
      >
      > 3- The FOne 230 is definitely a light wind power house. The board
      > actually shift the wind range of the kite 2 knots down (e.g., a kite
      > normally delivers 10 - 20 knots wind range would deliver 8 - 16
      knots
      > wind range with the FOne 230)
      >
      > 4- The wakeboard is slightly harder to ride but much easier to jibe
      (or
      > fake jibe) than the Clam Sandwich
      >
      > 5- The FOne 230 is both easier to ride and easier to jibe (a perfect
      > board for beginner and light wind if you don't have a kite big
      enough)
      >
      > 6- riding the wakeboard should be very similar to riding your
      snowboard
      > (the front foot steer the board and the back foot control how much
      you
      > want to turn the board). Don't press too hard on the back foot
      > otherwise you will be sliding down wind.
      >
      > 7- Doing tricks with the wakeboard is so easy as your feet is in
      perfect
      > center of the board allowing you to control the board without
      having
      > any undesirable "torque".
      >
      > 8- For a wakeboard or snowboard, it's best to have the binding at
      the
      > same distance (slightly larger than 1/2 shoulder width) of the
      center of
      > the board and around 10-15 degrees "flaring out"
      >
      > 9- Don't waste your money buying a specially made kiteboard
      wakeboard, a
      > standard production wakeboard works just fine and much cheaper too
      > (around 1/2 of the price and you can buy a used one for less than
      $200
      > US)
      >
      > 10- I witnessed a beginner today having his best run on a standard
      > production wakeboard (with high wrap binding too!). Yes, it's
      possible
      > to learn kitesurfing using a standard production wakeboard.
      >
      > 11- Jibing on a small directional is still much more artistic and
      > elegant than all the tricks you can do with a wakeboard.
      >
      > 12- Nothing beat going out in 5 - 10 knots with a large kite and the
      > FOne 230 (you feel processing a divine power of going VERY fast
      while
      > everyone else is either slogging or in the water)
      >
      > Hung.
    • Hung Vu
      Kenny, ... After riding the wakeboard, I don t think riding a large bi-directional is fun for strong wind. The advantage of a small directional is such that
      Message 2 of 11 , Sep 5, 2001
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        Kenny,

        fernmanus@... wrote:
        > My opinion is different than yours. If I were to pick the best all
        > around board I would select a large bidirectional board like the
        > 169cm Wake-N-Style. My friend had a Clam Sandwich that we both rode
        > many times. Once we tried the Wake-N-Style, we weren't interested in
        > riding the Clam anymore. My friend sold his clam a little while
        > ago. We now ride most of the time on pickleforks, but I still have a
        > Litewave for light wind riding.

        After riding the wakeboard, I don't think riding a large bi-directional
        is fun for strong wind. The advantage of a small directional is such
        that it can feel large in light wind (flat the board out more) and small
        in strong wind (ride just the tail of the board) - therefore the best
        all-around board.

        > For high wind riding, I prefer a kite specific board over a
        > traditional wakeboard. I like the deeper rails on a kite specific
        > board. I think they help the board track better when you are really
        > powered up.

        This can be achieved quite easily with technique (steer/edge the board
        with both feet and don't press to hard on the back foot).

        The other option is to install 2 fins at each end of the board (can be
        done quite easily with any wakeboard) - I was thinking of doing that
        until I discovered that it actually more fun with only 1 fin at each end
        (feel just like riding my snow board).

        Hung.
      • eric_george@yahoo.com
        Hung, You are right about the ease of adding fins to a wakeboard, just drill holes in the same pattern as have been done at the factory, just on the corners
        Message 3 of 11 , Sep 5, 2001
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          Hung,

          You are right about the ease of adding fins to a wakeboard, just
          drill holes in the same pattern as have been done at the factory,
          just on the corners where you want the fins to be. It took me about
          ten minutes. I have been riding mine with 5 fins actually. I left the
          middle rear fin in so I could use the bolt on top to attach my leash.

          For $170, I bought an O'Brien AMP 145 new... Everything that makes it
          undesirable for wakeboarding is a benefit for Kiteboarding... flat
          rocker, large size, straighter rails. In fact, it has a very similar
          shape to the new Naish that will cost around $600.
        • fernmanus@yahoo.com
          Hung, ... directional ... such ... small ... best ... A large bi-directional does not ride like a wakeboard. It is far more forgiving. You would be surprised
          Message 4 of 11 , Sep 5, 2001
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            Hung,

            > After riding the wakeboard, I don't think riding a large bi-
            directional
            > is fun for strong wind. The advantage of a small directional is
            such
            > that it can feel large in light wind (flat the board out more) and
            small
            > in strong wind (ride just the tail of the board) - therefore the
            best
            > all-around board.

            A large bi-directional does not ride like a wakeboard. It is far
            more forgiving. You would be surprised how well you can ride a bi-
            directional in strong wind. I have used one many times and I was
            able to control the board very well by edging. The only reason I use
            a wakeboard most of the time now is that it is easier to control in
            the air while jumping. I still believe a bi-directional is superior
            to a directional board for learning, especially if you have never
            windsurfed before. Why bother to learn how to jibe a directional
            when it is so easy on a bi-directional? What you said about a
            directional feeling large in light wind and small in strong wind is
            also true for a bi-directional. You can ride the board flat in light
            wind and use the edge in strong wind.

            I feel too many beginners are instructed to buy a large directional
            for learning. Most beginners would be more happy starting on a large
            bi-directional board. Fortunately, large bi-directional boards like
            the Bic 215 and Litewave 181 became available this year.

            After using the Clam Sandwich and the Litewave 169. I proclaim the
            Litewave as the better all around board. So does my good friend, he
            used a Clam Sandwich all last summer. I let him try my Litewave once
            and he kept borrowing it every chance he could until he finally
            purchased one for himself. Hung, have you tried the Litewave or
            another bi-directional?

            Kenny




            --- In ksurfschool@y..., Hung Vu <hungvu@n...> wrote:
            > Kenny,
            >
            > fernmanus@y... wrote:
            > > My opinion is different than yours. If I were to pick the best
            all
            > > around board I would select a large bidirectional board like the
            > > 169cm Wake-N-Style. My friend had a Clam Sandwich that we both
            rode
            > > many times. Once we tried the Wake-N-Style, we weren't
            interested in
            > > riding the Clam anymore. My friend sold his clam a little while
            > > ago. We now ride most of the time on pickleforks, but I still
            have a
            > > Litewave for light wind riding.
            >
            > After riding the wakeboard, I don't think riding a large bi-
            directional
            > is fun for strong wind. The advantage of a small directional is
            such
            > that it can feel large in light wind (flat the board out more) and
            small
            > in strong wind (ride just the tail of the board) - therefore the
            best
            > all-around board.
            >
            > > For high wind riding, I prefer a kite specific board over a
            > > traditional wakeboard. I like the deeper rails on a kite specific
            > > board. I think they help the board track better when you are
            really
            > > powered up.
            >
            > This can be achieved quite easily with technique (steer/edge the
            board
            > with both feet and don't press to hard on the back foot).
            >
            > The other option is to install 2 fins at each end of the board (can
            be
            > done quite easily with any wakeboard) - I was thinking of doing that
            > until I discovered that it actually more fun with only 1 fin at
            each end
            > (feel just like riding my snow board).
            >
            > Hung.
          • Fritz@cabincover.com
            ... makes it ... flat ... similar ... I ve yet to get a directional going.. but these O Brien s are on sale for $99. at: www.culvermarina.com/catalog.htm
            Message 5 of 11 , Sep 5, 2001
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              >
              > For $170, I bought an O'Brien AMP 145 new... Everything that
              makes it
              > undesirable for wakeboarding is a benefit for Kiteboarding...
              flat
              > rocker, large size, straighter rails. In fact, it has a very
              similar
              > shape to the new Naish that will cost around $600.



              I've yet to get a directional going.. but these O'Brien's are on
              sale for $99. at: www.culvermarina.com/catalog.htm Seems
              like a pretty inexpensive way to test fly a wakeboard.
            • Hung Vu
              Kenny, Maybe I did not make myself clear. Due to the riding position, a directional board can be made larger by pressing more on the front foot and made
              Message 6 of 11 , Sep 5, 2001
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                Kenny,

                Maybe I did not make myself clear. Due to the riding position, a
                directional board can be made larger by pressing more on the front foot
                and made smaller by sinking the tail - pressing more on the back foot
                (change the "pitch" of the board). This effect is more pronounce on a
                smaller directional. This allow me to ride a small directional in wind
                as low as 5-6 knots and in wind as high as 35+ knots.

                A larger bi-directional maybe good for beginner and light wind but I am
                not sure I want to ride one in 20+ knots.

                Hung.

                fernmanus@... wrote:
                >
                > Hung,
                >
                > > After riding the wakeboard, I don't think riding a large bi-
                > directional
                > > is fun for strong wind. The advantage of a small directional is
                > such
                > > that it can feel large in light wind (flat the board out more) and
                > small
                > > in strong wind (ride just the tail of the board) - therefore the
                > best
                > > all-around board.
                >
                > A large bi-directional does not ride like a wakeboard. It is far
                > more forgiving. You would be surprised how well you can ride a bi-
                > directional in strong wind. I have used one many times and I was
                > able to control the board very well by edging. The only reason I use
                > a wakeboard most of the time now is that it is easier to control in
                > the air while jumping. I still believe a bi-directional is superior
                > to a directional board for learning, especially if you have never
                > windsurfed before. Why bother to learn how to jibe a directional
                > when it is so easy on a bi-directional? What you said about a
                > directional feeling large in light wind and small in strong wind is
                > also true for a bi-directional. You can ride the board flat in light
                > wind and use the edge in strong wind.
                >
                > I feel too many beginners are instructed to buy a large directional
                > for learning. Most beginners would be more happy starting on a large
                > bi-directional board. Fortunately, large bi-directional boards like
                > the Bic 215 and Litewave 181 became available this year.
                >
                > After using the Clam Sandwich and the Litewave 169. I proclaim the
                > Litewave as the better all around board. So does my good friend, he
                > used a Clam Sandwich all last summer. I let him try my Litewave once
                > and he kept borrowing it every chance he could until he finally
                > purchased one for himself. Hung, have you tried the Litewave or
                > another bi-directional?
                >
                > Kenny
                >
                > --- In ksurfschool@y..., Hung Vu <hungvu@n...> wrote:
                > > Kenny,
                > >
                > > fernmanus@y... wrote:
                > > > My opinion is different than yours. If I were to pick the best
                > all
                > > > around board I would select a large bidirectional board like the
                > > > 169cm Wake-N-Style. My friend had a Clam Sandwich that we both
                > rode
                > > > many times. Once we tried the Wake-N-Style, we weren't
                > interested in
                > > > riding the Clam anymore. My friend sold his clam a little while
                > > > ago. We now ride most of the time on pickleforks, but I still
                > have a
                > > > Litewave for light wind riding.
                > >
                > > After riding the wakeboard, I don't think riding a large bi-
                > directional
                > > is fun for strong wind. The advantage of a small directional is
                > such
                > > that it can feel large in light wind (flat the board out more) and
                > small
                > > in strong wind (ride just the tail of the board) - therefore the
                > best
                > > all-around board.
                > >
                > > > For high wind riding, I prefer a kite specific board over a
                > > > traditional wakeboard. I like the deeper rails on a kite specific
                > > > board. I think they help the board track better when you are
                > really
                > > > powered up.
                > >
                > > This can be achieved quite easily with technique (steer/edge the
                > board
                > > with both feet and don't press to hard on the back foot).
                > >
                > > The other option is to install 2 fins at each end of the board (can
                > be
                > > done quite easily with any wakeboard) - I was thinking of doing that
                > > until I discovered that it actually more fun with only 1 fin at
                > each end
                > > (feel just like riding my snow board).
                > >
                > > Hung.
                >
                >
                >
                >
                > Your use of Yahoo! Groups is subject to http://docs.yahoo.com/info/terms/
              • fernmanus@yahoo.com
                Hung, I rode a large 169 bidirectional board last year. Often in winds ranging from 20 - 30 knots. I was able to handle the conditions as well as any of my
                Message 7 of 11 , Sep 6, 2001
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                  Hung,

                  I rode a "large" 169 bidirectional board last year. Often in winds
                  ranging from 20 - 30 knots. I was able to handle the conditions as
                  well as any of my friends out on small directionals. A lot of people
                  do ride bidirectional boards in high winds all the time. Franz Orly
                  is a good example. You should try one some time. I think that you
                  would be surprised how versatile a good bi-directional board can be.

                  Kenny

                  --- In ksurfschool@y..., Hung Vu <hungvu@n...> wrote:
                  > Kenny,
                  >
                  > Maybe I did not make myself clear. Due to the riding position, a
                  > directional board can be made larger by pressing more on the front
                  foot
                  > and made smaller by sinking the tail - pressing more on the back
                  foot
                  > (change the "pitch" of the board). This effect is more pronounce
                  on a
                  > smaller directional. This allow me to ride a small directional in
                  wind
                  > as low as 5-6 knots and in wind as high as 35+ knots.
                  >
                  > A larger bi-directional maybe good for beginner and light wind but
                  I am
                  > not sure I want to ride one in 20+ knots.
                  >
                  > Hung.
                  >
                  > fernmanus@y... wrote:
                  > >
                  > > Hung,
                  > >
                  > > > After riding the wakeboard, I don't think riding a large bi-
                  > > directional
                  > > > is fun for strong wind. The advantage of a small directional is
                  > > such
                  > > > that it can feel large in light wind (flat the board out more)
                  and
                  > > small
                  > > > in strong wind (ride just the tail of the board) - therefore the
                  > > best
                  > > > all-around board.
                  > >
                  > > A large bi-directional does not ride like a wakeboard. It is far
                  > > more forgiving. You would be surprised how well you can ride a
                  bi-
                  > > directional in strong wind. I have used one many times and I was
                  > > able to control the board very well by edging. The only reason I
                  use
                  > > a wakeboard most of the time now is that it is easier to control
                  in
                  > > the air while jumping. I still believe a bi-directional is
                  superior
                  > > to a directional board for learning, especially if you have never
                  > > windsurfed before. Why bother to learn how to jibe a directional
                  > > when it is so easy on a bi-directional? What you said about a
                  > > directional feeling large in light wind and small in strong wind
                  is
                  > > also true for a bi-directional. You can ride the board flat in
                  light
                  > > wind and use the edge in strong wind.
                  > >
                  > > I feel too many beginners are instructed to buy a large
                  directional
                  > > for learning. Most beginners would be more happy starting on a
                  large
                  > > bi-directional board. Fortunately, large bi-directional boards
                  like
                  > > the Bic 215 and Litewave 181 became available this year.
                  > >
                  > > After using the Clam Sandwich and the Litewave 169. I proclaim
                  the
                  > > Litewave as the better all around board. So does my good friend,
                  he
                  > > used a Clam Sandwich all last summer. I let him try my Litewave
                  once
                  > > and he kept borrowing it every chance he could until he finally
                  > > purchased one for himself. Hung, have you tried the Litewave or
                  > > another bi-directional?
                  > >
                  > > Kenny
                  > >
                  > > --- In ksurfschool@y..., Hung Vu <hungvu@n...> wrote:
                  > > > Kenny,
                  > > >
                  > > > fernmanus@y... wrote:
                  > > > > My opinion is different than yours. If I were to pick the
                  best
                  > > all
                  > > > > around board I would select a large bidirectional board like
                  the
                  > > > > 169cm Wake-N-Style. My friend had a Clam Sandwich that we
                  both
                  > > rode
                  > > > > many times. Once we tried the Wake-N-Style, we weren't
                  > > interested in
                  > > > > riding the Clam anymore. My friend sold his clam a little
                  while
                  > > > > ago. We now ride most of the time on pickleforks, but I still
                  > > have a
                  > > > > Litewave for light wind riding.
                  > > >
                  > > > After riding the wakeboard, I don't think riding a large bi-
                  > > directional
                  > > > is fun for strong wind. The advantage of a small directional is
                  > > such
                  > > > that it can feel large in light wind (flat the board out more)
                  and
                  > > small
                  > > > in strong wind (ride just the tail of the board) - therefore the
                  > > best
                  > > > all-around board.
                  > > >
                  > > > > For high wind riding, I prefer a kite specific board over a
                  > > > > traditional wakeboard. I like the deeper rails on a kite
                  specific
                  > > > > board. I think they help the board track better when you are
                  > > really
                  > > > > powered up.
                  > > >
                  > > > This can be achieved quite easily with technique (steer/edge the
                  > > board
                  > > > with both feet and don't press to hard on the back foot).
                  > > >
                  > > > The other option is to install 2 fins at each end of the board
                  (can
                  > > be
                  > > > done quite easily with any wakeboard) - I was thinking of doing
                  that
                  > > > until I discovered that it actually more fun with only 1 fin at
                  > > each end
                  > > > (feel just like riding my snow board).
                  > > >
                  > > > Hung.
                  > >
                  > >
                  > >
                  > >
                  > > Your use of Yahoo! Groups is subject to
                  http://docs.yahoo.com/info/terms/
                • Hung Vu
                  Kenny, All right, I may try a large bi-directional in strong wind one of these days when I have a chance. The only question I have is then why do you want a
                  Message 8 of 11 , Sep 6, 2001
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                    Kenny,

                    All right, I may try a large bi-directional in strong wind one of these
                    days when I have a chance.

                    The only question I have is then why do you want a small bi-directional
                    when a larger one is so versatile?

                    The 5'9" directional is all I need for all conditions.

                    P.S. The only reason I want the wakeboard is for traveling (no extra
                    cost with most airlines) and of course after having discovered that it's
                    great for fun sliding & jumping around - don't tell me that you want a
                    small bi-directional for the same reason ;-)

                    Hung.

                    fernmanus@... wrote:
                    >
                    > Hung,
                    >
                    > I rode a "large" 169 bidirectional board last year. Often in winds
                    > ranging from 20 - 30 knots. I was able to handle the conditions as
                    > well as any of my friends out on small directionals. A lot of people
                    > do ride bidirectional boards in high winds all the time. Franz Orly
                    > is a good example. You should try one some time. I think that you
                    > would be surprised how versatile a good bi-directional board can be.
                    >
                    > Kenny
                    >
                    > --- In ksurfschool@y..., Hung Vu <hungvu@n...> wrote:
                    > > Kenny,
                    > >
                    > > Maybe I did not make myself clear. Due to the riding position, a
                    > > directional board can be made larger by pressing more on the front
                    > foot
                    > > and made smaller by sinking the tail - pressing more on the back
                    > foot
                    > > (change the "pitch" of the board). This effect is more pronounce
                    > on a
                    > > smaller directional. This allow me to ride a small directional in
                    > wind
                    > > as low as 5-6 knots and in wind as high as 35+ knots.
                    > >
                    > > A larger bi-directional maybe good for beginner and light wind but
                    > I am
                    > > not sure I want to ride one in 20+ knots.
                    > >
                    > > Hung.
                    > >
                    > > fernmanus@y... wrote:
                    > > >
                    > > > Hung,
                    > > >
                    > > > > After riding the wakeboard, I don't think riding a large bi-
                    > > > directional
                    > > > > is fun for strong wind. The advantage of a small directional is
                    > > > such
                    > > > > that it can feel large in light wind (flat the board out more)
                    > and
                    > > > small
                    > > > > in strong wind (ride just the tail of the board) - therefore the
                    > > > best
                    > > > > all-around board.
                    > > >
                    > > > A large bi-directional does not ride like a wakeboard. It is far
                    > > > more forgiving. You would be surprised how well you can ride a
                    > bi-
                    > > > directional in strong wind. I have used one many times and I was
                    > > > able to control the board very well by edging. The only reason I
                    > use
                    > > > a wakeboard most of the time now is that it is easier to control
                    > in
                    > > > the air while jumping. I still believe a bi-directional is
                    > superior
                    > > > to a directional board for learning, especially if you have never
                    > > > windsurfed before. Why bother to learn how to jibe a directional
                    > > > when it is so easy on a bi-directional? What you said about a
                    > > > directional feeling large in light wind and small in strong wind
                    > is
                    > > > also true for a bi-directional. You can ride the board flat in
                    > light
                    > > > wind and use the edge in strong wind.
                    > > >
                    > > > I feel too many beginners are instructed to buy a large
                    > directional
                    > > > for learning. Most beginners would be more happy starting on a
                    > large
                    > > > bi-directional board. Fortunately, large bi-directional boards
                    > like
                    > > > the Bic 215 and Litewave 181 became available this year.
                    > > >
                    > > > After using the Clam Sandwich and the Litewave 169. I proclaim
                    > the
                    > > > Litewave as the better all around board. So does my good friend,
                    > he
                    > > > used a Clam Sandwich all last summer. I let him try my Litewave
                    > once
                    > > > and he kept borrowing it every chance he could until he finally
                    > > > purchased one for himself. Hung, have you tried the Litewave or
                    > > > another bi-directional?
                    > > >
                    > > > Kenny
                    > > >
                    > > > --- In ksurfschool@y..., Hung Vu <hungvu@n...> wrote:
                    > > > > Kenny,
                    > > > >
                    > > > > fernmanus@y... wrote:
                    > > > > > My opinion is different than yours. If I were to pick the
                    > best
                    > > > all
                    > > > > > around board I would select a large bidirectional board like
                    > the
                    > > > > > 169cm Wake-N-Style. My friend had a Clam Sandwich that we
                    > both
                    > > > rode
                    > > > > > many times. Once we tried the Wake-N-Style, we weren't
                    > > > interested in
                    > > > > > riding the Clam anymore. My friend sold his clam a little
                    > while
                    > > > > > ago. We now ride most of the time on pickleforks, but I still
                    > > > have a
                    > > > > > Litewave for light wind riding.
                    > > > >
                    > > > > After riding the wakeboard, I don't think riding a large bi-
                    > > > directional
                    > > > > is fun for strong wind. The advantage of a small directional is
                    > > > such
                    > > > > that it can feel large in light wind (flat the board out more)
                    > and
                    > > > small
                    > > > > in strong wind (ride just the tail of the board) - therefore the
                    > > > best
                    > > > > all-around board.
                    > > > >
                    > > > > > For high wind riding, I prefer a kite specific board over a
                    > > > > > traditional wakeboard. I like the deeper rails on a kite
                    > specific
                    > > > > > board. I think they help the board track better when you are
                    > > > really
                    > > > > > powered up.
                    > > > >
                    > > > > This can be achieved quite easily with technique (steer/edge the
                    > > > board
                    > > > > with both feet and don't press to hard on the back foot).
                    > > > >
                    > > > > The other option is to install 2 fins at each end of the board
                    > (can
                    > > > be
                    > > > > done quite easily with any wakeboard) - I was thinking of doing
                    > that
                    > > > > until I discovered that it actually more fun with only 1 fin at
                    > > > each end
                    > > > > (feel just like riding my snow board).
                    > > > >
                    > > > > Hung.
                    > > >
                    > > >
                    > > >
                    > > >
                    > > > Your use of Yahoo! Groups is subject to
                    > http://docs.yahoo.com/info/terms/
                    >
                    >
                    >
                    >
                    > Your use of Yahoo! Groups is subject to http://docs.yahoo.com/info/terms/
                  • fernmanus@yahoo.com
                    Hung, I use the small bi-directional or wakeboard for the same reason as you do - it is way more fun when jumping. A smaller board is less awkward in the air
                    Message 9 of 11 , Sep 7, 2001
                    • 0 Attachment
                      Hung,

                      I use the small bi-directional or wakeboard for the same reason as
                      you do - it is way more fun when jumping. A smaller board is less
                      awkward in the air and it is easier to really load up for a big air.

                      What I was trying to say earlier is that a large bi-directional (ie.
                      169 Litewave) is every bit as versatile as a 5'9" Clam Sandwich. So,
                      I do hope you will take the opportunity to try one. The only problem
                      is that you may stop using your Clam Sandwich altogether. It is so
                      easy and fun to ride toeside on a large bi-directional.

                      I also hope you get the chance to fly a big inflatible someday like
                      the AB 16.4. It may change your opinion about the proper kite to use
                      on light wind days. You could probably even ride your wakeboard in 7
                      knots. I can ride mine in 9 knots, but I weigh 50 LBS more than
                      you.

                      I hope you find some good wind this weekend. I hope this thread has
                      been helpful to people new to the sport.

                      Kenny

                      --- In ksurfschool@y..., Hung Vu <hungvu@n...> wrote:
                      > Kenny,
                      >
                      > All right, I may try a large bi-directional in strong wind one of
                      these
                      > days when I have a chance.
                      >
                      > The only question I have is then why do you want a small bi-
                      directional
                      > when a larger one is so versatile?
                      >
                      > The 5'9" directional is all I need for all conditions.
                      >
                      > P.S. The only reason I want the wakeboard is for traveling (no extra
                      > cost with most airlines) and of course after having discovered that
                      it's
                      > great for fun sliding & jumping around - don't tell me that you
                      want a
                      > small bi-directional for the same reason ;-)
                      >
                      > Hung.
                      >
                      > fernmanus@y... wrote:
                      > >
                      > > Hung,
                      > >
                      > > I rode a "large" 169 bidirectional board last year. Often in
                      winds
                      > > ranging from 20 - 30 knots. I was able to handle the conditions
                      as
                      > > well as any of my friends out on small directionals. A lot of
                      people
                      > > do ride bidirectional boards in high winds all the time. Franz
                      Orly
                      > > is a good example. You should try one some time. I think that
                      you
                      > > would be surprised how versatile a good bi-directional board can
                      be.
                      > >
                      > > Kenny
                      > >
                      > > --- In ksurfschool@y..., Hung Vu <hungvu@n...> wrote:
                      > > > Kenny,
                      > > >
                      > > > Maybe I did not make myself clear. Due to the riding position,
                      a
                      > > > directional board can be made larger by pressing more on the
                      front
                      > > foot
                      > > > and made smaller by sinking the tail - pressing more on the back
                      > > foot
                      > > > (change the "pitch" of the board). This effect is more
                      pronounce
                      > > on a
                      > > > smaller directional. This allow me to ride a small directional
                      in
                      > > wind
                      > > > as low as 5-6 knots and in wind as high as 35+ knots.
                      > > >
                      > > > A larger bi-directional maybe good for beginner and light wind
                      but
                      > > I am
                      > > > not sure I want to ride one in 20+ knots.
                      > > >
                      > > > Hung.
                      > > >
                      > > > fernmanus@y... wrote:
                      > > > >
                      > > > > Hung,
                      > > > >
                      > > > > > After riding the wakeboard, I don't think riding a large bi-
                      > > > > directional
                      > > > > > is fun for strong wind. The advantage of a small
                      directional is
                      > > > > such
                      > > > > > that it can feel large in light wind (flat the board out
                      more)
                      > > and
                      > > > > small
                      > > > > > in strong wind (ride just the tail of the board) -
                      therefore the
                      > > > > best
                      > > > > > all-around board.
                      > > > >
                      > > > > A large bi-directional does not ride like a wakeboard. It is
                      far
                      > > > > more forgiving. You would be surprised how well you can ride
                      a
                      > > bi-
                      > > > > directional in strong wind. I have used one many times and I
                      was
                      > > > > able to control the board very well by edging. The only
                      reason I
                      > > use
                      > > > > a wakeboard most of the time now is that it is easier to
                      control
                      > > in
                      > > > > the air while jumping. I still believe a bi-directional is
                      > > superior
                      > > > > to a directional board for learning, especially if you have
                      never
                      > > > > windsurfed before. Why bother to learn how to jibe a
                      directional
                      > > > > when it is so easy on a bi-directional? What you said about a
                      > > > > directional feeling large in light wind and small in strong
                      wind
                      > > is
                      > > > > also true for a bi-directional. You can ride the board flat
                      in
                      > > light
                      > > > > wind and use the edge in strong wind.
                      > > > >
                      > > > > I feel too many beginners are instructed to buy a large
                      > > directional
                      > > > > for learning. Most beginners would be more happy starting on
                      a
                      > > large
                      > > > > bi-directional board. Fortunately, large bi-directional
                      boards
                      > > like
                      > > > > the Bic 215 and Litewave 181 became available this year.
                      > > > >
                      > > > > After using the Clam Sandwich and the Litewave 169. I
                      proclaim
                      > > the
                      > > > > Litewave as the better all around board. So does my good
                      friend,
                      > > he
                      > > > > used a Clam Sandwich all last summer. I let him try my
                      Litewave
                      > > once
                      > > > > and he kept borrowing it every chance he could until he
                      finally
                      > > > > purchased one for himself. Hung, have you tried the Litewave
                      or
                      > > > > another bi-directional?
                      > > > >
                      > > > > Kenny
                      > > > >
                      > > > > --- In ksurfschool@y..., Hung Vu <hungvu@n...> wrote:
                      > > > > > Kenny,
                      > > > > >
                      > > > > > fernmanus@y... wrote:
                      > > > > > > My opinion is different than yours. If I were to pick the
                      > > best
                      > > > > all
                      > > > > > > around board I would select a large bidirectional board
                      like
                      > > the
                      > > > > > > 169cm Wake-N-Style. My friend had a Clam Sandwich that we
                      > > both
                      > > > > rode
                      > > > > > > many times. Once we tried the Wake-N-Style, we weren't
                      > > > > interested in
                      > > > > > > riding the Clam anymore. My friend sold his clam a little
                      > > while
                      > > > > > > ago. We now ride most of the time on pickleforks, but I
                      still
                      > > > > have a
                      > > > > > > Litewave for light wind riding.
                      > > > > >
                      > > > > > After riding the wakeboard, I don't think riding a large bi-
                      > > > > directional
                      > > > > > is fun for strong wind. The advantage of a small
                      directional is
                      > > > > such
                      > > > > > that it can feel large in light wind (flat the board out
                      more)
                      > > and
                      > > > > small
                      > > > > > in strong wind (ride just the tail of the board) -
                      therefore the
                      > > > > best
                      > > > > > all-around board.
                      > > > > >
                      > > > > > > For high wind riding, I prefer a kite specific board over
                      a
                      > > > > > > traditional wakeboard. I like the deeper rails on a kite
                      > > specific
                      > > > > > > board. I think they help the board track better when you
                      are
                      > > > > really
                      > > > > > > powered up.
                      > > > > >
                      > > > > > This can be achieved quite easily with technique
                      (steer/edge the
                      > > > > board
                      > > > > > with both feet and don't press to hard on the back foot).
                      > > > > >
                      > > > > > The other option is to install 2 fins at each end of the
                      board
                      > > (can
                      > > > > be
                      > > > > > done quite easily with any wakeboard) - I was thinking of
                      doing
                      > > that
                      > > > > > until I discovered that it actually more fun with only 1
                      fin at
                      > > > > each end
                      > > > > > (feel just like riding my snow board).
                      > > > > >
                      > > > > > Hung.
                      > > > >
                      > > > >
                      > > > >
                      > > > >
                      > > > > Your use of Yahoo! Groups is subject to
                      > > http://docs.yahoo.com/info/terms/
                      > >
                      > >
                      > >
                      > >
                      > > Your use of Yahoo! Groups is subject to
                      http://docs.yahoo.com/info/terms/
                    • hungvu@netcom.ca
                      Kenny, ... air. Sounds like we are in somewhat agreement here (as far as big air, I still jump slightly higher with the 5 9 directional - As I have been using
                      Message 10 of 11 , Sep 7, 2001
                      • 0 Attachment
                        Kenny,

                        --- In ksurfschool@y..., fernmanus@y... wrote:
                        > I use the small bi-directional or wakeboard for the same reason as
                        > you do - it is way more fun when jumping. A smaller board is less
                        > awkward in the air and it is easier to really load up for a big
                        air.

                        Sounds like we are in somewhat agreement here (as far as big air, I
                        still jump slightly higher with the 5'9" directional - As I have
                        been using the 5'9" for more than a year and the wakeboard only a
                        few months, I still need more time getting used to the wakeboard).

                        > What I was trying to say earlier is that a large bi-directional
                        (ie.
                        > 169 Litewave) is every bit as versatile as a 5'9" Clam Sandwich.
                        So,
                        > I do hope you will take the opportunity to try one. The only
                        problem
                        > is that you may stop using your Clam Sandwich altogether. It is so
                        > easy and fun to ride toeside on a large bi-directional.

                        I will try one in strong wind whenever I have a chance but I am not
                        convinced yet that a large bi-directional is OK for me in strong wind
                        (as I don't see how to make the board smaller). With the current
                        wakeboard, there are times I felt that if I had used a slightly
                        bigger wakeboard (151) it would have been too much.

                        Having used the wakeboard extensively in the last 2 months I have
                        missed my jibes so much and start longing for doing some soon. I
                        don't think I ever stopped riding a directional (neither I stopped
                        skiing after having become an advanced snowboarder)

                        > I also hope you get the chance to fly a big inflatible someday like
                        > the AB 16.4. It may change your opinion about the proper kite to
                        use
                        > on light wind days. You could probably even ride your wakeboard in
                        7
                        > knots. I can ride mine in 9 knots, but I weigh 50 LBS more than
                        > you.

                        Inflatables do not fly well in light wind (sub 7 knots) I have had
                        plenty experiences with them with the Wipika Classic 8.5 and AR5
                        11.5. I was hoping the AB 16.4 is better but it is too risky to
                        spend a large amount of money to find out that it is the same in such
                        light wind (I was thinking of ordering a 16.4 earlier this year and
                        change my mind after remembered the wind I suppose to use the 16.4
                        in).

                        Hung.
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