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Re: [ksurfschool] Beginner board advice

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  • Hung Vu
    ... At 145 lb, the FOne 215 is a better all around board, unless you want to sail in really light wind and have another board for strong wind then go with the
    Message 1 of 6 , Mar 5, 2001
      banfield@... wrote:
      >
      > Hi,
      > I'm thinking of buying a board so that once some warm weather comes,
      > I can learn to kitesurf. I'm interested in some advice weighing the
      > relative merits of a couple of boards that I've seen in classifieds.
      > I'm a decent waterskier (slalom), adequate windsurfer (longtime, but
      > no real jibing), good dinghy sailor (LONGtime), good downhill skier,
      > novice snowboarder, and I've never surfed. I weigh about 145 pounds.
      > I've been kiteskiing 3 times, which has gone pretty well in spite of
      > the very gusty conditions we have. It is likely to be fairly gusty
      > again on the lake I'll use this summer. The lake is deep, about 1
      > mile wide, and 40 miles long. Chop is frequently 1-2 feet or more
      > because of the long fetch with the predominately along lake winds.
      > I've seen a Naish Sky Pirate 7'6" for sale and an F-One 215. These
      > both seem roughly right for beginning, right? Would anyone care to
      > suggest merits of one over the other, or perhaps a different direction
      > entirely? I figure the gusty conditions favor a floaty directional
      > over a wakeboard (in spite of the ease of avoiding jibing).

      At 145 lb, the FOne 215 is a better all around board, unless you want to
      sail in really light wind and have another board for strong wind then go
      with the 7'6".

      Hung.
    • hyperboutlife@aol.com
      Don....from what little i know so far...dont try to learn on a wakeboard.....I have been wakeboarding for 13 yrs and snowboarding for 7...and all i could do
      Message 2 of 6 , Mar 5, 2001
        Don....from what little i know so far...dont try to learn on a
        wakeboard.....I have been wakeboarding for 13 yrs and snowboarding for
        7...and all i could do last fall at Hatterus was go down wind on my
        wakeboard...granted the conditions were strong at times for my Naish 11.5,
        but the advanced riders gave me alot of credit for trying to learn on a
        wakeboard. I had no trouble riding or going up wind on the floaty 7 foot
        plus directionals i tried out there. The guy teaching out there was using
        an 8 footer for his students. Hope that helps!!
        Ben
      • Chris Moore
        Don, IMHO I think you would be best suited for the Wake n Style boards by Lite Wave Designs. Your novice level snowboarding skills will help a little and you
        Message 3 of 6 , Mar 6, 2001
          Don,

          IMHO I think you would be best suited for the Wake n' Style boards by Lite
          Wave Designs. Your novice level snowboarding skills will help a little and
          you will have the quickest success with this board. A lot has been written
          about these boards in this group. They are a kiteboard and eliminate a lot
          of the frustration factors you encounter with wakeboards. At 145lbs, I
          would definitely recommend the Wake n' Style 169 boards with bungee
          bindings. I am an instructor for Kitty Hawk Kites and teach total novices
          on this board and what I witness mostly is how much quicker they learn to go
          upwind than someone using a larger directional. Thinner rails for holding
          your edge easier, 3 stage rocker that gives you good floatation for a
          twintip, easy in/out bindings with option to upgrade bindings later, and a
          really tough board. I have a complete Wake n' Style with quad fins,
          pro-locks, NSI pads, footstraps and bungees if you are interested.

          Chris M. Moore

          From: banfield@...
          Subject: Beginner board advice

          Hi,
          I'm thinking of buying a board so that once some warm weather comes,
          I can learn to kitesurf. I'm interested in some advice weighing the
          relative merits of a couple of boards that I've seen in classifieds.
          I'm a decent waterskier (slalom), adequate windsurfer (longtime, but
          no real jibing), good dinghy sailor (LONGtime), good downhill skier,
          novice snowboarder, and I've never surfed. I weigh about 145 pounds.
          I've been kiteskiing 3 times, which has gone pretty well in spite of
          the very gusty conditions we have. It is likely to be fairly gusty
          again on the lake I'll use this summer. The lake is deep, about 1
          mile wide, and 40 miles long. Chop is frequently 1-2 feet or more
          because of the long fetch with the predominately along lake winds.
          I've seen a Naish Sky Pirate 7'6" for sale and an F-One 215. These
          both seem roughly right for beginning, right? Would anyone care to
          suggest merits of one over the other, or perhaps a different direction
          entirely? I figure the gusty conditions favor a floaty directional
          over a wakeboard (in spite of the ease of avoiding jibing).
          Thanks for the advice!

          Don Banfield
          Finger Lakes, NY

          _________________________________________________________________
          Get your FREE download of MSN Explorer at http://explorer.msn.com
        • Mel
          ... Compared to sailboards, kiteboards are incredibly easy to jibe. Unlike jibing sailboards, if you ve got decent kite skills (spend all your free time flying
          Message 4 of 6 , Mar 6, 2001
            <banfield@...> writes:

            > I figure the gusty conditions favor a floaty directional
            > over a wakeboard (in spite of the ease of avoiding jibing).

            Compared to sailboards, kiteboards are incredibly easy to jibe.
            Unlike jibing sailboards, if you've got decent kite skills (spend all your
            free time flying the kite by itself before you get on a board) you don't
            need to worry about falling off a plane (just move the kite to power you
            back up), or digging the front rail too much (just move the kite & the board
            will follow), or even switching your feet at the right moment (just sail out
            without even switching your feet, then switch them after you regain
            comfortable control).

            Mel
          • Mel
            ... It s ALL in the kite. I ve read that good wakeboarders who get sufficient kite practice first have no problem (& I believe it). I spent over 30 hours
            Message 5 of 6 , Mar 6, 2001
              <hyperboutlife@...> wrote:

              > I have been wakeboarding for 13 yrs and snowboarding for
              > 7...and all i could do last fall at Hatterus was go down wind on my
              > wakeboard...

              It's ALL in the kite. I've read that good wakeboarders who get sufficient
              kite practice first have no problem (& I believe it). I spent over 30 hours
              with the kite in the air ( before & after work) before trying to get on a
              board, & so I only had to walk upwind about 8 times (5 days). Guys who
              started a month before I even got my kite were asking me for tips after my
              first week on the water.

              Mel
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