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Day 2 on ARC 4.5 ("630")

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  • kiteboard@aol.com
    Day 132. 1/30/1 ~1.5hrs. (new total 5 hrs on 4.5 ARC) First day with ARC at gusty Cabrillo. I guess I didn t sand the TE enough for my attempt at downwind
    Message 1 of 10 , Jan 31, 2001
      Day 132. 1/30/1 ~1.5hrs. (new total 5 hrs on 4.5 ARC)

      First day with ARC at gusty Cabrillo. I guess I didn't sand the TE enough
      for my attempt at downwind launching (before inflating enough it pulled out
      on one side & folded in half) so I used the edge-launching technique with
      great success (even though the wind was really too light to even stay
      upwind). Just sand one tip, stand on it while holding up the other one (to
      partially preinflate), walk back to the bar & pretend it's a Naish (pull). I
      think this will be my preferred method. Since it didn't look windy enough to
      ride, I'd launched the kite first, but was still able to attach my boardleash
      later, which is normally impossible here (although even with an ARC it would
      still be quite difficult with an ankle strap, or sufficient wind). I needed
      to actually look at kite periodically, & keep one hand ready to grab the bar,
      but it's still MUCH better than a Naish. With this kite it's "only" quite
      dangerous here (instead of nearly suicidal).

      MUCH easier on the water too: New wipeout recovery technique - in trim loop,
      let go of bar & ignore kite while using both hands to straighten goggles &
      helmet, position board & get in straps! Much more forgiving to jibe also,
      since the inherent luff resistance keeps the lines from going too slack when
      you don't turn the board fast enough relative to the kite (which happened
      frequently since it's so much quicker turning, AND quicker to cross the
      window). I think I'm really going to like the ability to now jibe at a
      moment's notice (when the swell suddenly looks nice).

      I can't get the graph to load, but the highest pager reading I saw was
      average 13mph (11knots), peaking at 16 (<14knots). I would have ordinarily
      taken my 13.5AR5 & was working the 4.5 like crazy nearly the entire time,
      which was about as strenuous as working a Naish moderately (still not much
      fun). I still couldn't quite even stay upwind, but then Amin (170lb.) was on
      his 15.5, so I still think it may have NEARLY the same low-end range as the
      Naish of the same projected area. I couldn't really tell how gusty it was on
      the water, but if it handles gusts well that will always be the case!
      Obviously I still couldn't test the overall range.

      I came VERY close to hitting the water twice (once when wiping out, & once
      when working the kite just a little too close to the surface - the line
      actually caught the water!) but it's SO maneuverable that I managed to keep
      it dry, so I still haven't tested the waterlaunchability.

      It was quite nice to be able to back the kite down to land straight downwind,
      & just release it to the Naish-style leash (only one rear line under
      tension). No need to carry a screwdriver to tether the kiteleash, there's so
      little pull you can just attach it to the boardleash!

      Mel
    • Hung Vu
      ... Doesn t the ARC has a inflation zipper or velcro that you can open to let the kite pre-inflate while laying it down trailing edge to the wind (like the
      Message 2 of 10 , Jan 31, 2001
        kiteboard@... wrote:
        > First day with ARC at gusty Cabrillo. I guess I didn't sand the TE enough
        > for my attempt at downwind launching (before inflating enough it pulled out
        > on one side & folded in half) so I used the edge-launching technique with
        > great success (even though the wind was really too light to even stay
        > upwind). Just sand one tip, stand on it while holding up the other one (to
        > partially preinflate), walk back to the bar & pretend it's a Naish (pull). I
        > think this will be my preferred method. Since it didn't look windy enough to
        > ride, I'd launched the kite first, but was still able to attach my boardleash
        > later, which is normally impossible here (although even with an ARC it would
        > still be quite difficult with an ankle strap, or sufficient wind). I needed
        > to actually look at kite periodically, & keep one hand ready to grab the bar,
        > but it's still MUCH better than a Naish. With this kite it's "only" quite
        > dangerous here (instead of nearly suicidal).

        Doesn't the ARC has a inflation zipper or velcro that you can open to
        let the kite pre-inflate while laying it down trailing edge to the wind
        (like the Jojo Wet or the New Wave)?

        It's rather clumsy to attach the board leash to your ankle, it's better
        to have a metal ring attached to you harness and attach a marine
        carabiner (spelling?) to your board leash. With this setup, you can
        attach or remove the board leash from you harness with only one hand in
        less than a second (without even having to look at the ring or the
        carabiner)

        Hung.
      • Farnsworth, Kenny
        Mel, Thank you for the review. I really want to know how the ARC performs while jumping. Please give it a try and try some poorly timed jumps (AR5 luffs when
        Message 3 of 10 , Jan 31, 2001
          Mel,

          Thank you for the review. I really want to know how the ARC performs while
          jumping. Please give it a try and try some poorly timed jumps (AR5 luffs
          when your timing isn't right or the wind is not quite strong enough).

          Kenny

          -----Original Message-----
          From: kiteboard@... [mailto:kiteboard@...]
          Sent: Wednesday, January 31, 2001 9:32 AM
          To: kitesurf@yahoogroups.com; ksurfschool@yahoogroups.com
          Subject: [ksurfschool] Day 2 on ARC 4.5 ("630")


          Day 132. 1/30/1 ~1.5hrs. (new total 5 hrs on 4.5 ARC)

          First day with ARC at gusty Cabrillo. I guess I didn't sand the TE enough
          for my attempt at downwind launching (before inflating enough it pulled out
          on one side & folded in half) so I used the edge-launching technique with
          great success (even though the wind was really too light to even stay
          upwind). Just sand one tip, stand on it while holding up the other one (to
          partially preinflate), walk back to the bar & pretend it's a Naish (pull).
          I
          think this will be my preferred method. Since it didn't look windy enough
          to
          ride, I'd launched the kite first, but was still able to attach my
          boardleash
          later, which is normally impossible here (although even with an ARC it would

          still be quite difficult with an ankle strap, or sufficient wind). I needed

          to actually look at kite periodically, & keep one hand ready to grab the
          bar,
          but it's still MUCH better than a Naish. With this kite it's "only" quite
          dangerous here (instead of nearly suicidal).

          MUCH easier on the water too: New wipeout recovery technique - in trim
          loop,
          let go of bar & ignore kite while using both hands to straighten goggles &
          helmet, position board & get in straps! Much more forgiving to jibe also,
          since the inherent luff resistance keeps the lines from going too slack when

          you don't turn the board fast enough relative to the kite (which happened
          frequently since it's so much quicker turning, AND quicker to cross the
          window). I think I'm really going to like the ability to now jibe at a
          moment's notice (when the swell suddenly looks nice).

          I can't get the graph to load, but the highest pager reading I saw was
          average 13mph (11knots), peaking at 16 (<14knots). I would have ordinarily
          taken my 13.5AR5 & was working the 4.5 like crazy nearly the entire time,
          which was about as strenuous as working a Naish moderately (still not much
          fun). I still couldn't quite even stay upwind, but then Amin (170lb.) was
          on
          his 15.5, so I still think it may have NEARLY the same low-end range as the
          Naish of the same projected area. I couldn't really tell how gusty it was
          on
          the water, but if it handles gusts well that will always be the case!
          Obviously I still couldn't test the overall range.

          I came VERY close to hitting the water twice (once when wiping out, & once
          when working the kite just a little too close to the surface - the line
          actually caught the water!) but it's SO maneuverable that I managed to keep
          it dry, so I still haven't tested the waterlaunchability.

          It was quite nice to be able to back the kite down to land straight
          downwind,
          & just release it to the Naish-style leash (only one rear line under
          tension). No need to carry a screwdriver to tether the kiteleash, there's
          so
          little pull you can just attach it to the boardleash!

          Mel
        • jeremybuzzard@yahoo.com.au
          Great to hear your review of the ARC 4.5... I can give an account from someone with a little bit less experience! I had a couple of kitesurf lessons (using a
          Message 4 of 10 , Jan 31, 2001
            Great to hear your review of the ARC 4.5... I can give an account
            from someone with a little bit less experience!

            I had a couple of kitesurf lessons (using a Wipika Classic 5.0
            and then a Naish AR3.5 about 9m), then I went on to using my
            friends 3.6m PL waterfoil. I went out about half a dozen times on
            the waterfoil before getting my own PL Arc 630.

            First time down at the beach - this was the first time I flew a 4line
            kite, so I spent ages trying to get line lengths right. Had the kite
            stall directly downwind a couple of times trying to get the trim
            working. After about an hour of mucking around I was away.
            Inflating the kite is really easy - just sand down the trailing edge,
            leaving about a foot around the velcro valve, then open the valve
            and let the wind blow in. Close the valve again, and pull on the
            bar until the kite makes a wall - hold it there for a sec and then
            pull so the sand comes off the trailing edge - as it ascends, you
            can see the cells filling up with air (it looks really cool!). The
            other option is to hold it 45degrees to the wind (stand on one
            edge and hold the other edge above your head), which also
            works really well. I couldn't luff the kite, nomatter how hard I tried.
            About 12knots of wind.

            Second time down at the beach - 15knots, increasing to 18 later
            in the day. Launched the kite again without a problem. Got a
            friend to do a couple of body drags through the water (his first
            time with a kite) - suddenly he powered right up and let go of the
            bar (good move), but the kite flew away down the beach. What
            had happened was the left back line had snapped, so the kite
            powered off to the right - he let go and the safety leash slid out
            from the back line (the same one that snapped). We caught the
            kite and put it away for a while. I shortened all the lines by a
            couple of feet so we could still use the broken line (hoping that
            there are no more weak spots anywhere), and launched again. I
            went for a surf and found it so easy to go upwind.. I was pretty
            tired so I went back to the beach. It was a pretty gusty 18 knots
            by now. Tested the emergency line again by dropping the bar on
            the beach... The kite propellered down to earth (ten more
            minutes working out tangles). I put the kite up again, and a gust
            pulled me up in to the air, swinging me under the kite.... The kite
            luffed (!!!!yes, they can luff), but stayed very high in the air while it
            drifted - a bit of a power up when the lines went tight again, and it
            pulled me much higher in the air this time - I did a bigger swing
            and the kite way overflew and did a bigger luff. I watched the kite
            drift back towards the centre of the wind window and made the
            decision that I was going to get hammered so I dropped the bar -
            everyone agreed that it was a pretty good move, and I packed up.

            Conclusions (from a beginner):

            1. The kite is really stable in the air.
            2. Very easy to launch downwind (at risk of a bit of a big drag)
            3. Simple to surf with.

            4.... The safety system that is supplied with the kite and bar
            package is woefully inadequate... The back line leaders that
            come with the kite are not long enough to tie a safety to (ie, tip of
            one leader to the tip of the other, via the bar is less than the kite
            wingspan). Tying the safety line to a flying line goes against my
            better judgement (the thin flying line could potentially cut the
            safety line), but if you do decide to do it, make sure that the knot
            is strong as hell (try at least a rolling hitch or a double clove
            hitch)

            5. If you are likely to drop the bar much (ie are a beginner), then
            do yourself a favour and attatch the safey leash to both the back
            and front lines of one side of the kite - otherwise the kite
            propellers down to earth and is a complete bitch to straighten
            out - the kite can easily turn inside out a couple of times and I
            don't think I could even fly it with that much of a tangle (the friction
            would be huge)

            6. Go the extra mile and buy the twist grip bar - it sounds like a
            really good idea, and would make sheeting much easier.


            I am designing my own bar and line system for it - I want to have
            a sheeting system which can easily be released with one hand if
            I am overpowered - I will post it when I work out whether it works.

            Cheers
            Jeremy
          • kiteboard@aol.com
            In a message dated 1/31/01 11:02:31 PM Pacific Standard Time, kenny@rhodesbread.com writes: Me
            Message 5 of 10 , Jan 31, 2001
              In a message dated 1/31/01 11:02:31 PM Pacific Standard Time,
              kenny@... writes:

              << I really want to know how the ARC performs while
              jumping. >>

              Me too!

              << Please give it a try >>

              Well okay, if you really insist I guess I could try some jumps! Actually I
              would have already, if there'd been a few knots more wind. In fact it felt
              like I could nearly have jumped, even though severely underpowered, just
              because the kite is so quick to turn back, & fast across the window.

              << and try some poorly timed jumps (AR5 luffs
              when your timing isn't right or the wind is not quite strong enough). >>

              I actually recruited a friend to try that, who's borrowed an 8.0 ARC
              (projected). Even my AR5 has only luffed a couple of times while jumping.
              It might be possible to get an ARC to really fall when jumping, but when the
              gusts made it fly WAY back behind me on the beach yesterday, it still just
              drifted back controllably. If it started to fall from one side of the top,
              or the gust hit at an angle, it would tend to drift back to one side,
              rotating 90 degrees, & power up going across the window horizontally. I know
              this sounds bad, but the rotating tendency was easily corrected by simply
              steering it to keep it straight while it drifted back, & if it drifted too
              far into the center, the brakes could be applied to keep it from powering up
              too fast.

              Mel
            • kiteboard@aol.com
              In a message dated 1/31/01 12:04:08 PM Pacific Standard Time, hungvu@netcom.ca writes:
              Message 6 of 10 , Feb 1, 2001
                In a message dated 1/31/01 12:04:08 PM Pacific Standard Time,
                hungvu@... writes:

                << Doesn't the ARC has a inflation zipper or velcro that you can open to
                let the kite pre-inflate while laying it down trailing edge to the wind
                (like the Jojo Wet or the New Wave)? >>

                Yes, it does (Velcro), & I had let it pre-inflate through that opening as
                much as it would in the light winds, but when pulling the front lines to
                continue inflating, it pulled out from under the sand on one side, & folded
                in half. It probably would work with enough sand, & has the advantage of
                easy untwisting of the lines (compared to sanding only one tip), but line
                twisting should be unimportant, with solo downwind landings. Remember how
                easy it was with a 2-line sled? Just sand the tip, unwind the lines, pull a
                bit, spin the bar until the lines aren't twisted, & go!

                << It's rather clumsy to attach the board leash to your ankle, it's better
                to have a metal ring attached to you harness >>

                Absolutely!! I've always used a harness-attached boardleash, & that's why I
                could attach it after launching the kite (& the reason I commented it would
                be much harder with an ankle attachment).

                << and attach a marine
                carabiner (spelling?) to your board leash. >>

                I prefer to put the carabiner on the harness, so it doesn't whip around &
                chip the board (although I guess it could chip the board if you're carrying
                it against that side of your harness). The new DaKine leashes have a clip on
                the end, that's supposed to clip to the D-ring on the included ankle leash,
                or on their new harnesses*, but it clips directly to the slot in the end of a
                Reactor or standard spreader bar!
                *Today, DaKine said the Fusion & Pyro should be available in about 2 weeks.

                Mel
              • cglazier@home.com
                Mel A lot of us a following your reports on the ARC with interest. I know that you haven t fully tested the wind range, but if you had to label your ARC 4.5
                Message 7 of 10 , Feb 1, 2001
                  Mel
                  A lot of us a following your reports on the ARC with interest. I know
                  that you haven't fully tested the wind range, but if you had to label
                  your ARC 4.5 with a Naish/Wipika type of size, what size would it be?
                  Chris


                  --- In ksurfschool@y..., kiteboard@a... wrote:
                  > Day 132. 1/30/1 ~1.5hrs. (new total 5 hrs on 4.5 ARC)
                  >
                  > First day with ARC at gusty Cabrillo. I guess I didn't sand the TE
                  enough
                  > for my attempt at downwind launching (before inflating enough it
                  pulled out
                • Farnsworth, Kenny
                  Chris, It is pretty close to a 9.5 Naish AR-5 (projected area 5.3). As far as wind range, don t ask Mel he is lighter than most of us. Mel, can almost cover
                  Message 8 of 10 , Feb 1, 2001
                    Chris,

                    It is pretty close to a 9.5 Naish AR-5 (projected area 5.3).

                    As far as wind range, don't ask Mel he is lighter than most of us. Mel, can
                    almost cover the entire wind range with 2 or 3 kites. I use a quiver of 5
                    to cover the same range. I weigh 175 LBS (80 kg).

                    Kenny

                    -----Original Message-----
                    From: cglazier@... [mailto:cglazier@...]
                    Sent: Thursday, February 01, 2001 11:30 AM
                    To: ksurfschool@yahoogroups.com
                    Subject: [ksurfschool] Re: Day 2 on ARC 4.5 ("630")


                    Mel
                    A lot of us a following your reports on the ARC with interest. I know
                    that you haven't fully tested the wind range, but if you had to label
                    your ARC 4.5 with a Naish/Wipika type of size, what size would it be?
                    Chris


                    --- In ksurfschool@y..., kiteboard@a... wrote:
                    > Day 132. 1/30/1 ~1.5hrs. (new total 5 hrs on 4.5 ARC)
                    >
                    > First day with ARC at gusty Cabrillo. I guess I didn't sand the TE
                    enough
                    > for my attempt at downwind launching (before inflating enough it
                    pulled out
                  • kiteboard@aol.com
                    In a message dated 2/1/01 11:27:03 AM Pacific Standard Time, cglazier@home.com writes:
                    Message 9 of 10 , Feb 1, 2001
                      In a message dated 2/1/01 11:27:03 AM Pacific Standard Time,
                      cglazier@... writes:

                      << if you had to label
                      your ARC 4.5 with a Naish/Wipika type of size, what size would it be? >>

                      Short answer: Same as equal projected area (4.5 ARC "630" = 4.4 AR5 "7.5").

                      Long answer: I have NO idea about the new Wipika sizing, but it seems to have
                      very nearly the same low wind limit as an AR5 of the same specified projected
                      area. Wipika has added confusion to the point where I question the accuracy
                      of the projected area specs, & don't know if the ARX is measured the same as
                      the AR5, but I'm very familiar with the power of the AR5 with 4.4 projected
                      ("7.5 size"), & at the bottom end it's about the same as the ARC with 4.5
                      projected ("630 size"). Way back in my log I just found:
                      "...Fanatic 6'. ... Barely staying upwind working the 7.5 in 11mph avg."
                      That's two mph less low end than the ARC, although that was with the stock
                      fins, & I've been using a single 8.5" slotted Orca kite fin (like a sailboard
                      wave fin), which feels a little less efficient than the 9.25" Curtis B&J
                      sailboard fin I also use sometimes (which felt about the same as the stock
                      fins). I guess I could switch back to the 9.25, since it does feel better,
                      but I like the kelp-clearing of the more swept/raked 8.5, & with the slot
                      it's got the same spinout resistance.

                      Mel
                    • kiteboard@aol.com
                      In a message dated 2/1/01 2:12:20 PM Pacific Standard Time, jeremybuzzard@yahoo.com.au writes: What strength? The
                      Message 10 of 10 , Feb 1, 2001
                        In a message dated 2/1/01 2:12:20 PM Pacific Standard Time,
                        jeremybuzzard@... writes:

                        << the left back line had snapped, >>

                        What strength? The distributor & some group members say use 300lb on back,
                        but the manual says use 600s all-around (so that's what I'm using, since I
                        had them already on my bar!).

                        << the safety leash slid out
                        from the back line (the same one that snapped). >>

                        That's a good point. If that happens to be the line that breaks, you now
                        have no leash. That's a point in favor of the "two lines on one side" leash
                        system.

                        << dropping the bar on
                        the beach... The kite propellered down to earth (ten more
                        minutes working out tangles). >>

                        Another point in favor of the 2-line leash (as you mention later).

                        << I watched the kite
                        drift back towards the centre of the wind window and made the
                        decision that I was going to get hammered so I dropped the bar >>

                        If you keep the front lines long enough while on land, you can oversheet &
                        "brake" it so it doesn't move too fast up to the top, thereby safely reducing
                        the power.

                        << Very easy to launch downwind (at risk of a bit of a big drag) >>

                        Same technique works there (keep the "brakes" on).

                        << The safety system that is supplied with the kite and bar
                        package is woefully inadequate... >>

                        But anything that works with an inflatable sled will work fine.

                        << - the kite can easily turn inside out a couple of times and I
                        don't think I could even fly it with that much of a tangle (the friction
                        would be huge) >>

                        Line twists are less problem than one might think. I've flown my AR5 easily
                        with several twists.

                        << buy the twist grip bar - it sounds like a
                        really good idea, and would make sheeting much easier.
                        I am designing my own bar and line system for it - I want to have
                        a sheeting system which can easily be released with one hand if
                        I am overpowered - I will post it when I work out whether it works. >>

                        I just used the same "MelMods" as on my AR5. I think they work even better
                        on the ARC, since there seems to be even less need to hook into the rear
                        lines (even less load than an AR5, even when underpowered & constantly
                        sheeting in).

                        Mel
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