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Helping Orphans Is in Her Blood

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  • Sunny Jo
    Helping Orphans Is in Her Blood INKAS is short for International Korean Adoptee Services. Unlike other organizations working with orphans on the peninsula,
    Message 1 of 1 , Nov 2, 2003
      Helping Orphans Is in Her Blood

      INKAS is short for International Korean Adoptee Services. Unlike other
      organizations working with orphans on the peninsula, such as Holt
      Children's
      Services, INKAS does not send Korean babies to foreign countries but
      acts as a
      bridge for Korean adoptees to return to their mother country.

      Since 1954, Korea has sent 200,000 children to 14 countries to be
      adopted. But
      few organizations were interested in their heartache and instinct to
      find their roots
      the orphans later felt. Since 1999, under the theme "Family of Love,"
      INKAS has
      helped about 300 adoptees a year to visit their mother country and
      find their
      biological parents. It is a small organization of five employees,
      including president
      Jung Aie-ree, but the actual power comes from the devoted support of
      many
      volunteers.

      Jung worked for five years at Holt, after graduating from college.
      After becoming a
      mother of two, she tended to her dreams of making a happy family.
      However, her
      maternal grandmother, Yoon Hak-ja, now passed away, was known as the
      mother
      of Korean orphans. And her mother Yoon Cheong-mi, now 64, also devoted
      her
      youth to working at an orphanage, in the South Jeolla province city of
      Mokpo. A
      life dedicated to orphans was in Jung's blood, so she, like her
      grandmother,
      eventually returned to that world. The establishment of INKAS was
      based on her
      experiences at Holt, worrying about the post-adoption well-being of
      the orphans.

      Jung has some painful memories. There's the Swedish adoptee who
      escaped from
      racial discrimination but later committed suicide after an
      unsuccessful search for her
      parents in Korea; there's the American adoptee who suffered confusion
      under two
      transgender parents and later became homeless.

      ¡°Foreign adoption is still high because domestic adoption does not
      increase," Jung
      explained. "For scores of years, the society seems to have changed,
      but the
      avoidance of adoption doesn¡¯t seem to have changed a bit. We must ask
      ourselves whether foreign adoption is the best solution to unfortunate
      births and
      find an alternate solution.¡±

      (Joo Wan-joong, wjjoo@...)


      url:
      http://english.chosun.com/w21data/html/news/200310/200310290020.html





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