Loading ...
Sorry, an error occurred while loading the content.
 

Campaign launched for reunions of birth parents, half-Korean adoptees

Expand Messages
  • sunny_jo888
    http://www.koreaherald.co.kr/SITE/data/html_dir/2002/03/06/20020306001 2.asp Campaign launched for reunions of birth parents, half-Korean adoptees A Korean
    Message 1 of 1 , Mar 5, 2002
      http://www.koreaherald.co.kr/SITE/data/html_dir/2002/03/06/20020306001
      2.asp

      Campaign launched for reunions of birth parents, half-Korean adoptees

      A Korean adoption organization is launching a campaign to help those
      who
      are half-Korean and have been adopted by families in the United States
      reunite with their birth mothers, who may be living close to them.

      The International Korean Adoptee Services (InKAS) said yesterday that
      it is
      receiving applications until the end of next month for the reunion
      program
      between adoptees of mixed heritage and their biological mothers living
      in
      the United States. Eligible for the program are those born to Korean
      women
      and American men, and then later adopted into American families.

      "While searching for the birth parents of adoptees of mixed heritage,
      we
      found that many birth mothers were living in the United States. As a
      result, we started this campaign," said Jung Aie-ree, secretary
      general of
      the InKAS.

      InKAS, set up in 1999, is a nonprofit organization aimed at protecting
      the
      interests of overseas adoptees and adoptive families.

      "In cooperation with various adoption organizations and international
      marriage associations for Koreans in the United States, we will
      receive an
      initial 100 applications by the end of April," Jung said.

      The organization, which started publishing its monthly newsletter in
      December, said it plans to push ahead with a second campaign for
      adoptees
      of mixed heritage in July.

      Jung predicted that about 200,000 Koreans have been adopted into
      American
      families since the outbreak of the Korean War (1950-53). About 40,000
      of
      them were born to Korean women and American men.

      She said the organization has already helped five adoptees of mixed
      heritage meet their biological mothers, and another four reunions are
      under
      way.

      "Through the program, we want to help overseas adoptees establish
      their
      identities and inspire pride in their home country, while improving
      the
      image of Korea held by adoptees, adoptive families and adopting
      nations,"
      Jung said.

      Besides helping adoptees find their origins, she said the organization
      also
      offers a family exchange program, which gives a helping hand to
      adoptees
      and their families when visiting Korea.

      For further information, call 82-2-3148-0258, or send an e-mail to
      inkas21@....

      (sjkang@... By Kang Seok-jae Staff reporter)
    Your message has been successfully submitted and would be delivered to recipients shortly.