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Minn. Korean Adoptee Shares Story with Others

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  • Sunny Jo
    Minn. Korean Adoptee Shares Story with Others In January 5 EYEWITNESS NEWS brought you the emotional reunion of a Minnesota man and his Korean birth mom after
    Message 1 of 1 , Jul 1, 2009
      Minn. Korean Adoptee Shares Story with Others



      In January 5 EYEWITNESS NEWS brought you the emotional reunion of a
      Minnesota man and his Korean birth mom after being separated for 37
      years.

      On Tuesday, Jon Huston took his story to a camp for Korean adoptees in
      Hudson, Wis. and spent the day inspiring children to connect with
      their roots.

      "When they get older, they are going to have support. Back when I was
      younger, there weren't a lot of adoption groups," Huston explained.

      More than 150 Korean adoptees from Minnesota and surrounding states
      attended Camp Chosun to learn the language, martial arts—and most
      importantly—make friends with people who look just like them.

      "I kind of feel good because they are like me and know what it's like
      to be adopted," said camper Risa Klein of Rochester.

      Huston, one of the first Korean adoptees to come to Minnesota, also
      spent time with the kids and their parents.

      "My sons talk about how they come to camp and feel at home and feel so
      comfortable with who they are and what their connections are," said
      parent Ellen Carey.

      Huston also shared how he searched and found his birth mother through
      a Korean reality television show.

      Huston's birth father was an American soldier, who met his birth
      mother in Korea while stationed there during the Vietnam War. He died
      in combat.

      Huston's birth mother couldn't raise him on her own so she gave him up
      for adoption when he was six-years-old in 1971.

      He was adopted and raised by a family in Buffalo. Huston said it was
      not until he was married and held his first child that he longed to
      meet his birth mother.

      "I didn't want her to go to the grave thinking of her son," Huston said.

      He searched unsuccessfully for 10 years. Then in October, a Korean
      television reality show asked Huston to share his story. He appeared
      on the show using a webcam from his home in Minnesota.

      It took just barely a week for the show to find Huston's biological
      mother, and he was reunited with his mother briefly via webcam in
      November.

      Huston is just one of more than 13,000 Korean adoptees living in
      Minnesota. It is the largest number of Korean adoptees in any one
      place in the world.


      Related stories:
      Local adoptee reunited with birth mother

      More on Huston's story

      Susanna Song's Blog:
      Why is Minnesota a hot bed for Korean Adoptees?

      Searching for birth mom

      Follow an adopted Korean trying to find his birth mom

      http://kstp.com/news/stories/S1005547.shtml?cat=1
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