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KN4M 07-12-06

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  • Robert Sterling
    Please send as far and wide as possible. Thanks, Robert Sterling Editor, The Konformist http://www.konformist.com http://ety.com/HRP/racehate/shahakfw.htm
    Message 1 of 1 , Jul 12, 2006
      Please send as far and wide as possible.

      Thanks,
      Robert Sterling
      Editor, The Konformist
      http://www.konformist.com

      http://ety.com/HRP/racehate/shahakfw.htm

      Jewish History, Jewish Religion -
      The Weight of Three Thousand Years
      by Professor Israel Shahak

      "Jewish History, Jewish Religion" may be purchased at:
      http://www.amazon.com
      ---------------------------------------------------------------------
      -----------
      Foreword by Gore Vidal

      Sometime in the late 1950s, that world-class gossip and occasional
      historian, John F. Kennedy, told me how, in 1948, Harry S. Truman
      had been pretty much abandoned by everyone when he came to run for
      president. Then an American Zionist brought him two million dollars
      in cash, in a suitcase, aboard his whistle-stop campaign
      train. 'That's why our recognition of Israel was rushed through so
      fast.' As neither Jack nor I was an antisemite (unlike his father
      and my grandfather) we took this to be just another funny story
      about Truman and the serene corruption of American politics.

      Unfortunately, the hurried recognition of Israel as a state has
      resulted in forty-five years of murderous confusion, and the
      destruction of what Zionist fellow travellers thought would be a
      pluralistic state - home to its native population of Muslims,
      Christians and Jews, as well as a future home to peaceful European
      and American Jewish immigrants, even the ones who affected to
      believe that the great realtor in the sky had given them, in
      perpetuity, the lands of Judea and Sameria. Since many of the
      immigrants were good socialists in Europe, we assumed that they
      would not allow the new state to become a theocracy, and that the
      native Palestinians could live with them as equals. This was not
      meant to be. I shall not rehearse the wars and alarms of that
      unhappy region. But I will say that the hasty invention of Israel
      has poisoned the political and intellectual life of the USA,
      Israel's unlikely patron.

      Unlikely, because no other minority in American history has ever
      hijacked so much money from the American taxpayers in order to
      invest in a 'homeland'. It is as if the American taxpayer had been
      obliged to support the Pope in his reconquest of the Papal States
      simply because one third of our people are Roman Catholic. Had this
      been attempted, there would have been a great uproar and Congress
      would have said no. But a religious minority of less than two per
      cent has bought or intimidated seventy senators (the necessary two
      thirds to overcome an unlikely presidential veto) while enjoying
      support of the media.

      In a sense, I rather admire the way that the Israel lobby has gone
      about its business of seeing that billions of dollars, year after
      year, go to make Israel a 'bulwark against communism'. Actually,
      neither the USSR nor communism was ever much of a presence in the
      region. What America did manage to do was to turn the once friendly
      Arab world against us. Meanwhile, the misinformation about what is
      going on in the Middle East has got even greater and the principal
      victim of these gaudy lies - the American taxpayer to one side - is
      American Jewry, as it is constantly bullied by such professional
      terrorists as Begin and Shamir. Worse, with a few honorable
      exceptions, Jewish-American intellectuals abandoned liberalism for a
      series of demented alliances with the Christian (antisemtic) right
      and with the Pentagon-industrial complex. In 1985 one of them
      blithely wrote that when Jews arrived on the American scene
      they 'found liberal opinion and liberal politicians more congenial
      in their attitudes, more sensitive to Jewish concerns' but now it is
      in the Jewish interest to ally with the Protestant fundamentalists
      because, after all, "is there any point in Jews hanging on
      dogmatically, hypocritically, to their opinions of yesteryear?' At
      this point the American left split and those of us who criticised
      our onetime Jewish allies for misguided opportunism, were promptly
      rewarded with the ritual epithet 'antisemite' or 'self-hating Jew'.

      Fortunately, the voice of reason is alive and well, and in Israel,
      of all places. From Jerusalem, Israel Shahak never ceases to analyse
      not only the dismal politics of Israel today but the Talmud itself,
      and the effect of the entire rabbinical tradition on a small state
      that the right-wing rabbinate means to turn into a theocracy for
      Jews only. I have been reading Shahak for years. He has a satirist's
      eye for the confusions to be found in any religion that tries to
      rationalise the irrational. He has a scholar's sharp eye for textual
      contradictions. He is a joy to read on the great Gentile-hating Dr
      Maimonides.

      Needless to say, Israel's authorities deplore Shahak. But there is
      not much to be done with a retired professor of chemistry who was
      born in Warsaw in 1933 and spent his childhood in the concetration
      camp at Belsen. In 1945, he came to Israel; served in the Israeli
      military; did not become a Marxist in the years when it was
      fashionable. He was - and still is -a humanist who detests
      imperialism whether in the names of the God of Abraham or of George
      Bush. Equally, he opposes with great wit and learning the
      totalitarian strain in Judaism. Like a highly learned Thomas Paine,
      Shahank illustrates the prospect before us, as well as the long
      history behind us, and thus he continues to reason, year after year.
      Those who heed him will certainly be wiser and - dare I say? -
      better. He is the latest, if not the last, of the great prophets.

      *****

      Comedy Central Has New Chappelle Episodes
      Friday July 7, 2006
      AP

      Comedy Central couldn't resist the easy joke, opening the aborted
      third season of "Chappelle's Show" Sunday with a shot of an empty
      stage and introduction of a star who never appears.

      It's the first of three episodes compiled from sketches left behind
      before Dave Chappelle's now legendary freakout, walking out on a $50
      million contract and one of TV's hottest shows two years ago under
      still mysterious circumstances.

      "This isn't a designed farewell," said Neal Brennan, the show's co-
      creator who put them together. "There's no cliffhanger. These were
      just three out of what was supposed to be 10 and the other seven
      never happened."

      The opening sketch, besides illustrating the sharp comic touch that
      made the show popular, gives fodder for armchair psychologists.

      Chappelle is sitting in a barber's chair, getting a trim in a place
      that advertises $8 haircuts. His barber says Chappelle must be
      raking in the money as a big-time TV star.

      "Nah, man, it's cable," he replies. "I do all right, but it's
      nothing to write home about."

      Just then, a TV in the corner airs a report of Chappelle's big
      payday from Comedy Central. The barber's face turns cold and his
      haircut has a new price $11,000.

      Chappelle also gets a prediction from a dying man: "You didn't have
      to do two more seasons. No matter how good the show is, they're only
      going to say it's not as good as last year was."

      A second, darker sketch shows Chappelle exacting revenge on people
      who mistreated him before he was rich.

      "What I worry about is that everyone is going to look at it like a
      `CSI' episode, examine every show and say, `Oh, that's why Dave did
      that,'" Brennan said. "There are no clues. The thing that people
      forget is, I came up with half the ideas. And it's not like I knew
      he was going to Africa. Does it give you a look into my psyche?"

      But it's probably inevitable, said Comedy Central President Doug
      Herzog. He compared it to a musician who looks inward on his third
      album as a response to success on the first two.

      There were a lot of long discussions at Comedy Central about what to
      do with this material, Herzog said.

      "Once we saw the material, we thought it was fantastic," he
      said. "When you're in the comedy business, as we are, it's very hard
      to walk away from great material. It's so hard to find to begin
      with. We knew the audience wanted to see it. And I don't want to
      sound crass, but we had already paid for it."

      As the show's opening and jokes with sidekicks Charlie Murphy and
      Donnell Rawlings illustrate, "Chappelle's Show" isn't afraid to talk
      about what happened with Chappelle. It would have been dishonest
      otherwise, Brennan said.

      Even Chappelle has joked about it just not on Comedy Central.

      He told Conan O'Brien that his wife has given him guff for walking
      out on his big score. His spokeswoman did not return calls from The
      Associated Press.

      It's never been fully explained why he left. Chappelle has denied
      rumors of substance abuse or psychiatric problems. He's complained
      of arguments about the show with Comedy Central. (Herzog said the
      network had "almost no access' to Chappelle during work on the third
      season.) Chappelle also said he had doubts about how racial elements
      of his show were being taken.

      During an appearance on "Oprah" in February, Chappelle said that he
      might be amenable to returning to his show providing some
      arrangement could be made about providing money to charities.

      Since then, he hasn't returned any of Comedy Central's phone calls,
      Herzog said.

      Comedy Central is in the midst of its second marketing campaign to
      promote Chappelle's third season. After all the frustration, Herzog
      still says he wouldn't close the door on working with Chappelle
      again, calling him "arguably one of the great comedic voices of his
      generation, a comedic genius (and) a lovely guy, truthfully.

      "If I'm in the comedy business, if Dave Chappelle calls, I'm going
      to listen," Herzog said. "He's got to call, though."

      *****

      Google says bill could spark anti-trust complaints
      Tue Jul 4, 2006
      Reuters

      Google warned on Tuesday it will not hesitate to file anti-trust
      complaints in the United States if high-speed Internet providers
      abuse the market power they could receive from U.S. legislators.

      The U.S. Senate Commerce Committee last week approved sweeping
      communications reform legislation that would make it easier for
      telephone companies like AT&T to offer subscription television to
      consumers.

      But it narrowly rejected attempts by some lawmakers to strengthen
      safeguards on Internet service, which had pitted high-speed
      Internet, or broadband, providers such as AT&T against Internet
      content companies like Google.

      The battle centred on whether broadband providers can charge more to
      carry unaffiliated content or to guarantee service quality, an issue
      called Net neutrality.

      "If the legislators ... insist on neutrality, we will be happy. If
      they do not put it in, we will be less happy but then we will have
      to wait and see whether or not there actually is any abuse," Vint
      Cerf, a Google vice-president and one of the pioneers of the
      Internet, told a news conference in Bulgaria.

      "If we are not successful in our arguments ... then we will simply
      have to wait until something bad happens and then we will make known
      our case to the Department of Justice's anti-trust division," he
      said on Tuesday.

      Cerf is visiting Bulgaria at the invitation of President Georgi
      Parvanov to discuss ways to boost information technology business
      and Internet access in the country.

      The U.S. bill includes provisions aimed at preserving consumers'
      ability to surf anywhere on the public Internet and use any Internet-
      related application, software or service.

      "My company, along with many others believes that the Internet
      should stay open and accessible to everyone equally," Cerf said.

      "We are worried that some of the broadband service providers will
      interfere with that principle and will attempt to use their control
      over broadband transport facilities to interfere with services of
      competitors."

      Despite extensive lobbying by the telephone carriers, prospects for
      a final law this year remain uncertain. Congress faces a dwindling
      number of work days because of the November elections.

      If the measure passes the full Senate, it would have to be
      reconciled with a narrower bill approved by the House of
      Representatives.

      *****

      Report: NSA Sought Phone Records Before 9/11
      TruthDig.com
      Posted on Jul 2, 2006

      The NSA asked AT&T to help it set up a domestic call monitoring site
      seven months before the attacks of Sept. 11, 2001, allege lawyers
      filing a lawsuit on behalf of telephone company customers.

      This is huge because, according to a lawyer on the case, "The Bush
      Administration asserted this became necessary after 9/11.... This
      undermines that assertion."

      Bloomberg:

      The U.S. National Security Agency asked AT&T Inc. to help it set up
      a domestic call monitoring site seven months before the Sept. 11,
      2001 attacks, lawyers claimed June 23 in court papers filed in New
      York federal court.

      The allegation is part of a court filing adding AT&T, the nation's
      largest telephone company, as a defendant in a breach of privacy
      case filed earlier this month on behalf of Verizon Communications
      Inc. and BellSouth Corp. customers. The suit alleges that the three
      carriers, the NSA and President George W. Bush violated the
      Telecommunications Act of 1934 and the U.S. Constitution, and seeks
      money damages.

      "The Bush Administration asserted this became necessary after 9/11,"
      plaintiff's lawyer Carl Mayer said in a telephone interview. "This
      undermines that assertion."

      The lawsuit is related to an alleged NSA program to record and store
      data on calls placed by subscribers. More than 30 suits have been
      filed over claims that the carriers, the three biggest U.S.
      telephone companies, violated the privacy rights of their customers
      by cooperating with the NSA in an effort to track alleged
      terrorists.

      ***

      Spy Agency Sought U.S. Call Records Before 9/11, Lawyers Say

      June 30 (Bloomberg) -- The U.S. National Security Agency asked AT&T
      Inc. to help it set up a domestic call monitoring site seven months
      before the Sept. 11, 2001 attacks, lawyers claimed June 23 in court
      papers filed in New York federal court.

      The allegation is part of a court filing adding AT&T, the nation's
      largest telephone company, as a defendant in a breach of privacy
      case filed earlier this month on behalf of Verizon Communications
      Inc. and BellSouth Corp. customers. The suit alleges that the three
      carriers, the NSA and President George W. Bush violated the
      Telecommunications Act of 1934 and the U.S. Constitution, and seeks
      money damages.

      ``The Bush Administration asserted this became necessary after
      9/11,'' plaintiff's lawyer Carl Mayer said in a telephone interview.
      ``This undermines that assertion.''

      The lawsuit is related to an alleged NSA program to record and store
      data on calls placed by subscribers. More than 30 suits have been
      filed over claims that the carriers, the three biggest U.S.
      telephone companies, violated the privacy rights of their customers
      by cooperating with the NSA in an effort to track alleged
      terrorists.

      ``The U.S. Department of Justice has stated that AT&T may neither
      confirm nor deny AT&T's participation in the alleged NSA program
      because doing so would cause `exceptionally grave harm to national
      security' and would violate both civil and criminal statutes,'' AT&T
      spokesman Dave Pacholczyk said in an e-mail.

      U.S. Department of Justice spokesman Charles Miller and NSA
      spokesman Don Weber declined to comment.

      Pioneer Groundbreaker

      The NSA initiative, code-named ``Pioneer Groundbreaker,'' asked AT&T
      unit AT&T Solutions to build exclusively for NSA use a network
      operations center which duplicated AT&T's Bedminster, New Jersey
      facility, the court papers claimed. That plan was abandoned in favor
      of the NSA acquiring the monitoring technology itself, plaintiffs'
      lawyers Bruce Afran said.

      The NSA says on its Web site that in June 2000, the agency was
      seeking bids for a project to ``modernize and improve its
      information technology infrastructure.'' The plan, which included
      the privatization of its ``non-mission related'' systems support,
      was said to be part of Project Groundbreaker.

      Mayer said the Pioneer project is ``a different component'' of that
      initiative.

      Mayer and Afran said an unnamed former employee of the AT&T unit
      provided them with evidence that the NSA approached the carrier with
      the proposed plan. Afran said he has seen the worker's log book and
      independently confirmed the source's participation in the project.
      He declined to identify the employee.

      Stop Suit

      On June 9, U.S. District Court Judge P. Kevin Castel in New York
      stopped the lawsuit from moving forward while the Federal Judicial
      Panel on Multidistrict Litigation in Washington rules on a U.S.
      request to assign all related telephone records lawsuits to a single
      judge.

      Robert Varettoni, a spokesman for Verizon, said he was unaware of
      the allegations against AT&T and declined to comment.

      Earlier this week, he issued a statement on behalf of the company
      that Verizon had not been asked by the NSA to provide customer phone
      records from either its hard-wired or wireless networks. Verizon
      also said that it couldn't confirm or deny ``whether it has any
      relationship to the classified NSA program.''

      Mayer's lawsuit was filed following a May 11 USA Today report that
      the U.S. government was using the NSA to monitor domestic telephone
      calls. Earlier today, USA Today said it couldn't confirm its
      contention that BellSouth or Verizon had contracts with the NSA to
      provide a database of domestic customer phone call records.

      Jeff Battcher, a spokesman for Atlanta-based BellSouth, said that
      vindicated the company.

      ``We never turned over any records to the NSA,'' he said in a
      telephone interview. ``We've been clear all along that they've never
      contacted us. Nobody in our company has ever had any contact with
      the NSA.''

      The case is McMurray v. Verizon Communications Inc., 06cv3650, in
      the Southern District of New York.

      To contact the reporter on this story:
      Andrew Harris in Chicago at aharris16@...

      *****

      MediaMatters.org

      Media Matters asks Random House to investigate Coulter plagiarism
      allegations
      July 7, 2006

      Peter Olson, Chairman and CEO
      Stuart Applebaum, Public Relations
      Random House, Inc.
      1745 Broadway
      New York, NY 10019

      Jenny Frost, President and Publisher
      Tina Constable, Vice President, Executive Director of Publicity
      Crown Publishing Group
      1745 Broadway
      New York, NY 10019

      Dear Mr. Olson, Mr. Applebaum, Ms. Frost, and Ms. Constable:

      I am writing to bring to your attention troubling evidence that one
      of your authors, Ann Coulter, plagiarized portions of her recent
      Crown Publishing Group book, Godless: The Church of Liberalism.

      The New York Post reported on July 2 that John Barrie, who created
      a "leading plagiarism-recognition system," examined Coulter's book
      and found three examples of "textbook plagiarism." The Post reported:

      Barrie, CEO of iParadigms, told The Post that one 25-word passage
      from the "Godless" chapter titled "The Holiest Sacrament: Abortion"
      appears to have been lifted nearly word for word from Planned
      Parenthood literature published at least 18 months before Coulter's
      281-page book was released.

      A separate, 24-word string from the chapter "The Creation Myth"
      appeared about a year earlier in the San Francisco Chronicle with
      just one word change -- "stacked" was changed to "piled."

      Another 33-word passage that appears five pages into "Godless"
      allegedly comes from a 1999 article in the Portland (Maine) Press
      Herald.

      Meanwhile, many of the 344 citations Coulter includes
      in "Godless" "are very misleading," said Barrie, who holds a Ph.D.
      from the University of California at Berkeley, where he specialized
      in pattern recognition.

      "They're used purely to try and give the book a higher level of
      credibility -- as if it's an academic work. But her sloppiness in
      failing to properly attribute many other passages strips it of
      nearly all its academic merits," he told The Post.

      The Post went on to report that Barrie also found that "Coulter's
      Universal Press [Syndicate] columns from the past 12 months"
      included "similar patterns of cribbing":

      Her Aug. 3, 2005, column, "Read My Lips: No New Liberals," about
      U.S. Supreme Court Justice David Souter, includes six passages,
      ranging from 10 to 48 words each, that appeared 15 years earlier in
      the same order in an L.A. Times article, headlined "Liberals Leery
      as New Clues Surface on Souter's Views."

      But nowhere in that column does she mention the L.A. Times or the
      story's writer, David G. Savage.

      Her June 29, 2005, column, "Thou Shalt Not Commit Religion,"
      incorporates 10 facts on National Endowment for the Arts-funded work
      that originally appeared in the same order in a 1991 Heritage
      Foundation report, "The National Endowment for the Arts: Misusing
      Taxpayers' Money." But again, the Heritage Foundation isn't credited.

      I know Random House takes plagiarism very seriously, as it should.
      When evidence recently surfaced that Kaavya Viswanathan plagiarized
      from two books by Megan McCafferty, published by Random House
      subsidiary Crown Publishing Group, the company reportedly pressured
      Viswanathan's publisher -- Little, Brown & Co. -- to pull her book
      from stores.

      According to USA Today, in April 2006, "McCafferty's publisher, the
      Crown Publishing Group, labeled Viswanathan's actions 'literary
      identity theft' and had urged Little, Brown, which initially said
      her novel would remain on sale, to pull the book."

      The Boston Globe reported in May 2006 that Little, Brown would not
      publish a revised edition of Viswanathan's book, and that the
      publishing company made the rare decision not to publish a second
      book by Viswanathan, which was part of the original two-book
      contract with Little, Brown.

      The Associated Press reported in April 2006, "In a statement issued
      soon after Little, Brown's announcement, Crown said it was 'pleased
      that this matter has been resolved in an appropriate and timely
      fashion.' "

      Coulter has exhibited a pattern of behavior suggesting that Godless
      itself may include other examples of plagiarism beyond those Barrie
      has already identified. Now that the newspaper syndicate that
      publishes Coulter's column has indicated it will investigate the
      charges, we urge Random House to undertake a comprehensive review
      and consider all appropriate action, up to and including pulling the
      book. Coulter's unethical conduct, as evidenced through the
      instances of plagiarism identified in her columns, and manifested in
      the book itself, does not only tarnish Coulter; if immediate action
      is not taken, it will soon reflect poorly on Random House.

      Sincerely,

      David Brock
      President & CEO
      Media Matters for America
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