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Re: Amsteel question

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  • Kathlean
    Knots in rope generally create an area of lower resilience immediately after the knot. Just like baseballs have a core of rubber-band material so they can
    Message 1 of 7 , Mar 3 12:54 PM
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      Knots in rope generally create an area of lower resilience immediately after the knot. Just like baseballs have a core of rubber-band material so they can "bounce back," good rope has the ability to stretch a little when it experiences a sudden shock-weight. But in that spot right where the length of rope meets the knot, the resilience, the ability to take a sharp yank and then rebound, is drastically reduced.

      To answer your concern; unless the rope has been kinked or deformed by the knot tied in it, or the knot was left in for a long period of time, it should be unaffected once it's been untied. Just like always, if you exceed the weight-limit of the rope (what the manufacturer tells you), ASSUME it is damaged and don't trust it with your weight.

      When I sleep with camping hammocks, I usually use flat straps around the trunk of the tree, which saves the tree from damage and provides a better grip. For the rest, I use cord specifically designed for the purpose--I'm all about reading the manufacturer's directions when it comes to life-safety!


      > On Feb 23, 2013, at 7:46 AM, brendamcguinn wrote:
      >
      > > My boyfriend had a question I was hoping someone might could answer. We are planning to do some hammock camping this spring. David has been playing around with some different hanging systems. He wants to use Amsteel rope to cut down on weight while keeping strength. He read that tying knots in Amsteel rope would degrade its strength. What he was wondering was is the strength effected only while the rope was tied or if even after the knot was taken out does the rope remain weaker. Since the rope is being used to hang hammocks it will be supporting a person's weight overnight and taken down the next morning. I was just wondering if anyone out there has any experience with that kind of rope.
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      > > Yahoo! Groups Links
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    • Peter Hennessey
      Something which I haven t seen anyone discuss but which seems pertinent to me is the effect of sag in the hammock on the tension in the lines. The maths get
      Message 2 of 7 , Mar 4 11:48 AM
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        Something which I haven't seen anyone discuss but which seems pertinent to me is the effect of sag in the hammock on the tension in the lines. The maths get terribly complicated, but a simple diagram taken from lifting sling spread tables shows the effect.

        As you can see, if you rig your hammock nearly flat, the tension in the lines is 11.49 times the applied load. While modern lines can probably accept this loading, old fashioned tree bark probably can't ! Factor in some shock loading from rough use and things get way out of hand!

        Happy camping, Peter H.
        Sent from an iPad

        On 3 Mar 2013, at 01:54, "brendamcguinn" <brendamcguinn@...> wrote:

        > My boyfriend had a question I was hoping someone might could answer. We are planning to do some hammock camping this spring. David has been playing around with some different hanging systems. He wants to use Amsteel rope to cut down on weight while keeping strength. He read that tying knots in Amsteel rope would degrade its strength. What he was wondering was is the strength effected only while the rope was tied or if even after the knot was taken out does the rope remain weaker. Since the rope is being used to hang hammocks it will be supporting a person's weight overnight and taken down the next morning. I was just wondering if anyone out there has any experience with that kind of rope.
        >
        >


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      • gerald diamond
        I don t have your diagram but I think you must have a unit problem here. Did you start with kilos and end up with newtons? ... [Non-text portions of this
        Message 3 of 7 , Mar 5 7:04 AM
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          I don't have your diagram but I think you must have a unit problem here.
          Did you start with kilos and end up with newtons?






          >________________________________
          > From: Peter Hennessey <peterwhennessey@...>
          >To: "knottyers@yahoogroups.com" <knottyers@yahoogroups.com>
          >Sent: Monday, March 4, 2013 2:48:32 PM
          >Subject: Re: [KnotTyers] Amsteel question
          >
          >

          >Something which I haven't seen anyone discuss but which seems pertinent to me is the effect of sag in the hammock on the tension in the lines. The maths get terribly complicated, but a simple diagram taken from lifting sling spread tables shows the effect.
          >
          >As you can see, if you rig your hammock nearly flat, the tension in the lines is 11.49 times the applied load. While modern lines can probably accept this loading, old fashioned tree bark probably can't ! Factor in some shock loading from rough use and things get way out of hand!
          >
          >Happy camping, Peter H.
          >Sent from an iPad
          >
          >On 3 Mar 2013, at 01:54, "brendamcguinn" brendamcguinn@...> wrote:
          >
          >> My boyfriend had a question I was hoping someone might could answer. We are planning to do some hammock camping this spring. David has been playing around with some different hanging systems. He wants to use Amsteel rope to cut down on weight while keeping strength. He read that tying knots in Amsteel rope would degrade its strength. What he was wondering was is the strength effected only while the rope was tied or if even after the knot was taken out does the rope remain weaker. Since the rope is being used to hang hammocks it will be supporting a person's weight overnight and taken down the next morning. I was just wondering if anyone out there has any experience with that kind of rope.
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