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Re: [KnotTyers] rope supplies

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  • Trevor Tutt
    ... what material would you like it made from? what is it going to be used for. (the whipped lines, that is) -- What is twisted cannot be straightened...
    Message 1 of 17 , May 14, 2007
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      On Mon, 14 May 2007 20:26:08 -0000, you wrote:

      >I am looking for a good retailer in Canada that supplies whipping
      >material etc....
      >
      >I have tried to visit the local marine shop but work schedule just
      >doesn't allow it
      >
      >got any sites?
      >

      what material would you like it made from?
      what is it going to be used for. (the whipped lines, that is)


      --

      "What is twisted cannot be straightened..."

      Hand made, Hard Laid cotton cordage.
      For updating information, visit me at:
      www.oldbelfast.net
    • Chuck Henderson
      I am looking to whip the ends of 3/8 hemp rope for my scout troop to use for knot training ... just
      Message 2 of 17 , May 16, 2007
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        I am looking to whip the ends of 3/8 hemp rope for my scout troop to
        use for knot training



        --- In knottyers@yahoogroups.com, Trevor Tutt <ttutt@...> wrote:
        >
        > On Mon, 14 May 2007 20:26:08 -0000, you wrote:
        >
        > >I am looking for a good retailer in Canada that supplies whipping
        > >material etc....
        > >
        > >I have tried to visit the local marine shop but work schedule
        just
        > >doesn't allow it
        > >
        > >got any sites?
        > >
        >
        > what material would you like it made from?
        > what is it going to be used for. (the whipped lines, that is)
        >
        >
        > --
        >
        > "What is twisted cannot be straightened..."
        >
        > Hand made, Hard Laid cotton cordage.
        > For updating information, visit me at:
        > www.oldbelfast.net
        >
      • Trevor Tutt
        ... I was once told by a guy that got me interested in the whole rope making deal, that he used just cotton string, but when finished he would melt wax and let
        Message 3 of 17 , May 16, 2007
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          On Wed, 16 May 2007 15:55:13 -0000, you wrote:

          >I am looking to whip the ends of 3/8 hemp rope for my scout troop to
          >use for knot training

          I was once told by a guy that got me interested in the whole rope
          making deal, that he used just cotton string, but when finished he
          would melt wax and let it soak into the cotton after the whipping.
          He said it would virtually never come off after that.

          I've used cotton string, Hemp twine / cord, Flax twine at different
          times. I would think it would be best to stay with a natural fiber
          whipping for use on a natural fiber rope.

          I've bought hemp cord / twine at hobby stores like Hobby Lobby or
          Michaels (depending on where you live of course) they sell it in the
          jewelry making section for use in necklaces and bracelets. I've
          bought Flax and Hemp twine online but that will take a while.
          flax is rather expensive in comparison to the other choices.


          --

          "What is twisted cannot be straightened..."

          Hand made, Hard Laid cotton cordage.
          For updating information, visit me at:
          www.oldbelfast.net
        • Kohanzo, Keith
          I would suggest having the scouts do the whippings themselves. It s required for advancement to Tenderfoot, and most find a common whipping fairly easy to
          Message 4 of 17 , May 16, 2007
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            I would suggest having the scouts do the whippings themselves. It's
            required for advancement to Tenderfoot, and most find a common whipping
            fairly easy to learn. From my experience, whipping twine is best
            because, being waxed, it is stiffer than just string, and scouts find it
            easy to work with. You can find it at marine supply stores (such as
            West Marine) or at leatherworking supply stores. It can be pricey, but
            you can make a good substitute by rubbing household or kite string over
            the edge of a piece of paraffin or candle.

            Keith Kohanzo
            Charleston, Illinois
          • Chuck Henderson
            not required for Scout s Canada, and still need the whipping supplies. though I did hear someone suggest using fishing line, i was planning on using a
            Message 5 of 17 , May 16, 2007
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              not required for Scout's Canada, and still need the whipping
              supplies. though I did hear someone suggest using fishing line, i
              was planning on using a sailmaker whipping as it won't slide off the
              end of the rope like a western style would ( just to pick one as an
              example)


              --- In knottyers@yahoogroups.com, "Kohanzo, Keith" <kkkohanzo@...>
              wrote:
              >
              > I would suggest having the scouts do the whippings themselves.
              It's
              > required for advancement to Tenderfoot, and most find a common
              whipping
              > fairly easy to learn. From my experience, whipping twine is best
              > because, being waxed, it is stiffer than just string, and scouts
              find it
              > easy to work with. You can find it at marine supply stores (such
              as
              > West Marine) or at leatherworking supply stores. It can be
              pricey, but
              > you can make a good substitute by rubbing household or kite string
              over
              > the edge of a piece of paraffin or candle.
              >
              > Keith Kohanzo
              > Charleston, Illinois
              >
            • Trevor Tutt
              ... well, I tried to send this once, but it never showed up. take two!.... I was once told by a guy that got me interested in the whole rope making deal, that
              Message 6 of 17 , May 16, 2007
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                On Wed, 16 May 2007 15:55:13 -0000, you wrote:

                >I am looking to whip the ends of 3/8 hemp rope for my scout troop to
                >use for knot training

                well, I tried to send this once, but it never showed up.
                take two!....

                I was once told by a guy that got me interested in the whole rope
                making deal, that he used just cotton string, but when finished he
                would melt wax and let it soak into the cotton after the whipping.
                He said it would virtually never come off after that.

                I've used cotton string, Hemp twine / cord, Flax twine at different
                times. I would think it would be best to stay with a natural fiber
                whipping for use on a natural fiber rope.

                I've bought hemp cord / twine at hobby stores like Hobby Lobby or
                Michaels (depending on where you live of course) they sell it in the
                jewelry making section for use in necklaces and bracelets. I've
                bought Flax and Hemp twine online but that will take a while.
                flax is rather expensive in comparison to the other choices.


                --

                "What is twisted cannot be straightened..."

                Hand made, Hard Laid cotton cordage.
                For updating information, visit me at:
                www.oldbelfast.net
              • Dann Johnson
                When I whip the ends.. it is almost always with the same yarn- twine that I used to compose the strands. That way the whiping matches the rope. The scouts
                Message 7 of 17 , May 16, 2007
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                  When I whip the ends.. it is almost always with the same yarn- twine that I used to compose the strands. That way the whiping matches the rope.

                  The scouts should be able to whip their own rope ends, as that is a lot simpler to learn than back splicing. It usually takes me less than 4 or 5 minutes to demonstrate whipping an end, and seeing them sucessfully whip their own end. Teaching a back splice might take 15 to 30 minutes depending on how much interest the scout has.

                  Dann

                  "Kohanzo, Keith" <kkkohanzo@...> wrote:
                  I would suggest having the scouts do the whippings themselves. It's
                  required for advancement to Tenderfoot, and most find a common whipping
                  fairly easy to learn. From my experience, whipping twine is best
                  because, being waxed, it is stiffer than just string, and scouts find it
                  easy to work with. You can find it at marine supply stores (such as
                  West Marine) or at leatherworking supply stores. It can be pricey, but
                  you can make a good substitute by rubbing household or kite string over
                  the edge of a piece of paraffin or candle.

                  Keith Kohanzo
                  Charleston, Illinois






                  [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
                • Chuck Henderson
                  In canada the scouts are 11-14 yrs old, and whipping is beyond the attention span of a couple in my troop so I want to do it myself and if some of them show
                  Message 8 of 17 , May 16, 2007
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                    In canada the scouts are 11-14 yrs old, and whipping is beyond the
                    attention span of a couple in my troop so I want to do it myself and
                    if some of them show intrest, then I will show them, trying to stop
                    them from tying each other up is a chore in itself!!!

                    I have twelve lengths of 3/8 hemp, i have never done a whipping with
                    hemp, or heard of it, i was thinking of using dental floss as it is :

                    a) cheap
                    b) plentiful
                    c) easy to get
                    d) cheap
                    e) minty


                    --- In knottyers@yahoogroups.com, Dann Johnson <dann@...> wrote:
                    >
                    > When I whip the ends.. it is almost always with the same yarn-
                    twine that I used to compose the strands. That way the whiping
                    matches the rope.
                    >
                    > The scouts should be able to whip their own rope ends, as that
                    is a lot simpler to learn than back splicing. It usually takes me
                    less than 4 or 5 minutes to demonstrate whipping an end, and seeing
                    them sucessfully whip their own end. Teaching a back splice might
                    take 15 to 30 minutes depending on how much interest the scout has.
                    >
                    > Dann
                    >
                    > "Kohanzo, Keith" <kkkohanzo@...> wrote:
                    > I would suggest having the scouts do the whippings
                    themselves. It's
                    > required for advancement to Tenderfoot, and most find a common
                    whipping
                    > fairly easy to learn. From my experience, whipping twine is best
                    > because, being waxed, it is stiffer than just string, and scouts
                    find it
                    > easy to work with. You can find it at marine supply stores (such as
                    > West Marine) or at leatherworking supply stores. It can be pricey,
                    but
                    > you can make a good substitute by rubbing household or kite string
                    over
                    > the edge of a piece of paraffin or candle.
                    >
                    > Keith Kohanzo
                    > Charleston, Illinois
                    >
                    >
                    >
                    >
                    >
                    >
                    > [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
                    >
                  • John T Waidner
                    My choice for whipping twine is a beeswaxed nylon cord product called Nyltex. It s sold by shops that cater to the shoe repair trade, comes in 4 and 8 oz
                    Message 9 of 17 , May 16, 2007
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                      My choice for whipping twine is a beeswaxed nylon cord product called
                      Nyltex. It's sold by shops that cater to the shoe repair trade, comes
                      in 4 and 8 oz rolls, and in three colors: white, black, and brown. I'm
                      partial to the 8 oz brown roll myself. You can probably find it
                      locally. It is available via mail order. Tandy Leather carries it
                      (mail order) but they want $20 for a 4 oz roll, which is too much in my
                      opinion. Another source
                      (http://www.kitkraft.biz/product.php?productid=1487&cat=149&page=1)
                      wants $12.50 for 4 oz.
                      The product is well worth using. I use nothing else for whipping rope,
                      tying temporary whippings when splicing, etc. Nyltex may seem expensive
                      but it is considerably cheaper per foot than dental floss.

                      John Waidner
                      Carmel, IN


                      Chuck Henderson wrote:
                      >
                      > In canada the scouts are 11-14 yrs old, and whipping is beyond the
                      > attention span of a couple in my troop so I want to do it myself and
                      > if some of them show intrest, then I will show them, trying to stop
                      > them from tying each other up is a chore in itself!!!
                      >
                      > I have twelve lengths of 3/8 hemp, i have never done a whipping with
                      > hemp, or heard of it, i was thinking of using dental floss as it is :
                      >
                      > a) cheap
                      > b) plentiful
                      > c) easy to get
                      > d) cheap
                      > e) minty
                      >
                      > --- In knottyers@yahoogroups.com <mailto:knottyers%40yahoogroups.com>,
                      > Dann Johnson <dann@...> wrote:
                      > >
                      > > When I whip the ends.. it is almost always with the same yarn-
                      > twine that I used to compose the strands. That way the whiping
                      > matches the rope.
                      > >
                      > > The scouts should be able to whip their own rope ends, as that
                      > is a lot simpler to learn than back splicing. It usually takes me
                      > less than 4 or 5 minutes to demonstrate whipping an end, and seeing
                      > them sucessfully whip their own end. Teaching a back splice might
                      > take 15 to 30 minutes depending on how much interest the scout has.
                      > >
                      > > Dann
                      > >
                      > > "Kohanzo, Keith" <kkkohanzo@...> wrote:
                      > > I would suggest having the scouts do the whippings
                      > themselves. It's
                      > > required for advancement to Tenderfoot, and most find a common
                      > whipping
                      > > fairly easy to learn. From my experience, whipping twine is best
                      > > because, being waxed, it is stiffer than just string, and scouts
                      > find it
                      > > easy to work with. You can find it at marine supply stores (such as
                      > > West Marine) or at leatherworking supply stores. It can be pricey,
                      > but
                      > > you can make a good substitute by rubbing household or kite string
                      > over
                      > > the edge of a piece of paraffin or candle.
                      > >
                      > > Keith Kohanzo
                      > > Charleston, Illinois
                      > >
                      > >
                      > >
                      > >
                      > >
                      > >
                      > > [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
                      > >
                      >
                      >
                    • John T Waidner
                      Another note on Nyltex: A quick Google search turned up Montana Leather Co. (http://www.montanaleather.com/threadnylex.htm). They have Nyltex in all three
                      Message 10 of 17 , May 16, 2007
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                        Another note on Nyltex:

                        A quick Google search turned up Montana Leather Co.
                        (http://www.montanaleather.com/threadnylex.htm). They have Nyltex in
                        all three colors (brown, black, white), in 25 yd ($4US), 4 oz ($9) and 8
                        oz ($18).

                        John Waidner
                        Carmel, IN


                        Trevor Tutt wrote:
                        >
                        > On Mon, 14 May 2007 20:26:08 -0000, you wrote:
                        >
                        > >I am looking for a good retailer in Canada that supplies whipping
                        > >material etc....
                        > >
                        > >I have tried to visit the local marine shop but work schedule just
                        > >doesn't allow it
                        > >
                        > >got any sites?
                        > >
                        >
                        > what material would you like it made from?
                        > what is it going to be used for. (the whipped lines, that is)
                        >
                        > --
                        >
                        > "What is twisted cannot be straightened..."
                        >
                        > Hand made, Hard Laid cotton cordage.
                        > For updating information, visit me at:
                        > www.oldbelfast.net
                        >
                        >
                      • David
                        If you used the correct whipping for the job, and not just common whipping all of the time, you ll get the same result. David. From: Trevor Tutt
                        Message 11 of 17 , May 17, 2007
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                          If you used the correct whipping for the job, and not just common whipping
                          all of the time, you'll get the same result.
                          David.


                          From: "Trevor Tutt"
                          > On Wed, 16 May 2007 15:55:13 -0000, you wrote:
                          > I was once told by a guy that got me interested in the whole rope
                          > making deal, that he used just cotton string, but when finished he
                          > would melt wax and let it soak into the cotton after the whipping.
                          > He said it would virtually never come off after that.
                        • Trevor Tutt
                          ... true. i ve seen a few other types of rope-end whipping. seems they involved using sailmakers needles to pass the whipping through the strands. I would
                          Message 12 of 17 , May 17, 2007
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                            On Thu, 17 May 2007 11:32:04 +0100, you wrote:

                            >If you used the correct whipping for the job, and not just common whipping
                            >all of the time, you'll get the same result.
                            >David.

                            true. i've seen a few other types of rope-end whipping.
                            seems they involved using sailmakers needles to pass the whipping
                            through the strands. I would think that any whipping that didn't do
                            that would be just as susceptable to slipping off the end of a rope if
                            sufficiently stressed.


                            --

                            "What is twisted cannot be straightened..."

                            Hand made, Hard Laid cotton cordage.
                            For updating information, visit me at:
                            www.oldbelfast.net
                          • Trevor Tutt
                            ... well, Lord knows that the 11-14 year olds could use the touch of Minty Freshness now and then... ... -- What is twisted cannot be straightened... Hand
                            Message 13 of 17 , May 17, 2007
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                              On Thu, 17 May 2007 01:11:50 -0000, you wrote:

                              >In canada the scouts are 11-14 yrs old, and whipping is beyond the
                              >attention span of a couple in my troop so I want to do it myself and
                              >if some of them show intrest, then I will show them, trying to stop
                              >them from tying each other up is a chore in itself!!!
                              >
                              >I have twelve lengths of 3/8 hemp, i have never done a whipping with
                              >hemp, or heard of it, i was thinking of using dental floss as it is :
                              >
                              >a) cheap
                              >b) plentiful
                              >c) easy to get
                              >d) cheap
                              >e) minty

                              well, Lord knows that the 11-14 year olds could use the touch of
                              "Minty Freshness" now and then...
                              :)


                              --

                              "What is twisted cannot be straightened..."

                              Hand made, Hard Laid cotton cordage.
                              For updating information, visit me at:
                              www.oldbelfast.net
                            • jcdcstvns
                              Hello Sir i am BMC in the Navy and I use sail twine to end off any line it is the best when you use a Permanent whipping used with a sail needle, a good rule
                              Message 14 of 17 , May 18, 2007
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                                Hello Sir i am BMC in the Navy and I use sail twine to end off any
                                line it is the best when you use a Permanent whipping used with a
                                sail needle, a good rule to use is to wrap the end the same thickness
                                as the line itself. Hope this helps

                                R/
                                Knotter





                                --- In knottyers@yahoogroups.com, Trevor Tutt <ttutt@...> wrote:
                                >
                                > On Wed, 16 May 2007 15:55:13 -0000, you wrote:
                                >
                                > >I am looking to whip the ends of 3/8 hemp rope for my scout troop
                                to
                                > >use for knot training
                                >
                                > I was once told by a guy that got me interested in the whole rope
                                > making deal, that he used just cotton string, but when finished he
                                > would melt wax and let it soak into the cotton after the whipping.
                                > He said it would virtually never come off after that.
                                >
                                > I've used cotton string, Hemp twine / cord, Flax twine at different
                                > times. I would think it would be best to stay with a natural fiber
                                > whipping for use on a natural fiber rope.
                                >
                                > I've bought hemp cord / twine at hobby stores like Hobby Lobby or
                                > Michaels (depending on where you live of course) they sell it in
                                the
                                > jewelry making section for use in necklaces and bracelets. I've
                                > bought Flax and Hemp twine online but that will take a while.
                                > flax is rather expensive in comparison to the other choices.
                                >
                                >
                                > --
                                >
                                > "What is twisted cannot be straightened..."
                                >
                                > Hand made, Hard Laid cotton cordage.
                                > For updating information, visit me at:
                                > www.oldbelfast.net
                                >
                              • Chuck Henderson
                                Greetings I myself spent twelve years in the Canadian Navy, though I was an engineer! I was going to use a sailmaker whipping on 3/8 twisted hemp so a needle
                                Message 15 of 17 , May 18, 2007
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                                  Greetings I myself spent twelve years in the Canadian Navy, though I
                                  was an engineer! I was going to use a sailmaker whipping on 3/8
                                  twisted hemp so a needle isn't necessary.
                                  --- In knottyers@yahoogroups.com, jcdcstvns <no_reply@...> wrote:
                                  >
                                  > Hello Sir i am BMC in the Navy and I use sail twine to end off
                                  any
                                  > line it is the best when you use a Permanent whipping used with a
                                  > sail needle, a good rule to use is to wrap the end the same
                                  thickness
                                  > as the line itself. Hope this helps
                                  >
                                  > R/
                                  > Knotter
                                  >
                                  >
                                  >
                                  >
                                  >
                                  > --- In knottyers@yahoogroups.com, Trevor Tutt <ttutt@> wrote:
                                  > >
                                  > > On Wed, 16 May 2007 15:55:13 -0000, you wrote:
                                  > >
                                  > > >I am looking to whip the ends of 3/8 hemp rope for my scout
                                  troop
                                  > to
                                  > > >use for knot training
                                  > >
                                  > > I was once told by a guy that got me interested in the whole rope
                                  > > making deal, that he used just cotton string, but when finished
                                  he
                                  > > would melt wax and let it soak into the cotton after the
                                  whipping.
                                  > > He said it would virtually never come off after that.
                                  > >
                                  > > I've used cotton string, Hemp twine / cord, Flax twine at
                                  different
                                  > > times. I would think it would be best to stay with a natural
                                  fiber
                                  > > whipping for use on a natural fiber rope.
                                  > >
                                  > > I've bought hemp cord / twine at hobby stores like Hobby Lobby or
                                  > > Michaels (depending on where you live of course) they sell it
                                  in
                                  > the
                                  > > jewelry making section for use in necklaces and bracelets. I've
                                  > > bought Flax and Hemp twine online but that will take a while.
                                  > > flax is rather expensive in comparison to the other choices.
                                  > >
                                  > >
                                  > > --
                                  > >
                                  > > "What is twisted cannot be straightened..."
                                  > >
                                  > > Hand made, Hard Laid cotton cordage.
                                  > > For updating information, visit me at:
                                  > > www.oldbelfast.net
                                  > >
                                  >
                                • Charles Jacobus
                                  ... thickness ... troop ... different ... fiber
                                  Message 16 of 17 , Jun 24, 2007
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                                    --- In knottyers@yahoogroups.com, jcdcstvns <no_reply@...> wrote:
                                    >
                                    > Hello Sir i am BMC in the Navy and I use sail twine to end off any
                                    > line it is the best when you use a Permanent whipping used with a
                                    > sail needle, a good rule to use is to wrap the end the same
                                    thickness
                                    > as the line itself. Hope this helps
                                    >
                                    > R/
                                    > Knotter
                                    > To BMC:In the past any knotboards that I made all knot
                                    > bitter ends were whipped with sail twine and sealed with
                                    > two coats of thinned out varnish. And I have made many.
                                    > Charlie -- Ret. BM2/c
                                    >
                                    >
                                    >
                                    >
                                    > --- In knottyers@yahoogroups.com, Trevor Tutt <ttutt@> wrote:
                                    > >
                                    > > On Wed, 16 May 2007 15:55:13 -0000, you wrote:
                                    > >
                                    > > >I am looking to whip the ends of 3/8 hemp rope for my scout
                                    troop
                                    > to
                                    > > >use for knot training
                                    > >
                                    > > I was once told by a guy that got me interested in the whole rope
                                    > > making deal, that he used just cotton string, but when finished he
                                    > > would melt wax and let it soak into the cotton after the whipping.
                                    > > He said it would virtually never come off after that.
                                    > >
                                    > > I've used cotton string, Hemp twine / cord, Flax twine at
                                    different
                                    > > times. I would think it would be best to stay with a natural
                                    fiber
                                    > > whipping for use on a natural fiber rope.
                                    > >
                                    > > I've bought hemp cord / twine at hobby stores like Hobby Lobby or
                                    > > Michaels (depending on where you live of course) they sell it in
                                    > the
                                    > > jewelry making section for use in necklaces and bracelets. I've
                                    > > bought Flax and Hemp twine online but that will take a while.
                                    > > flax is rather expensive in comparison to the other choices.
                                    > >
                                    > >
                                    > > --
                                    > >
                                    > > "What is twisted cannot be straightened..."
                                    > >
                                    > > Hand made, Hard Laid cotton cordage.
                                    > > For updating information, visit me at:
                                    > > www.oldbelfast.net
                                    > >
                                    >
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