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Re: [KnotTyers] Re: Initial Guidance Needed

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  • Lindsey Philpott
    Hi Pat, If you cannot get the perma-lok needles then at least (or anyway) get some drafting tape. It is very useful as a temporary whipping and helps to guide
    Message 1 of 17 , Jul 8, 2006
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      Hi Pat,

      If you cannot get the perma-lok needles then at least (or anyway) get some drafting tape. It is very useful as a temporary whipping and helps to guide fine cords through any of the more complex knots, while keeping things together. Also, it helps by taping down the cords to a pattern instead of T-pins, although T-pins are my favorite tool when using flat patterns.

      Lindsey

      Patrick <pmhenrich@...> wrote:
      Thanks so much to everyone for all the great advice. I've looked at
      a lot of the books recommended already. ABOK seems like a great
      reference, but as has been pointed out, also seems to be a
      bit "heavy" to actually learn and expand to an intermediate level.
      I'm sure I'll be getting this one some day, that day just probably
      isn't today.

      I've done a fair amount of surfing around old posts and everything
      else I can find. It seems to me the most important tools to start
      out with are a marlinespike and some of the perm-a-lok needles
      everone is so keen on. Is there anything else needed for a starter
      kit? Besides a quality knife of course.

      To answer all the questions about location. I'm actually from
      Seattle, WA and learned a lot of the knots I know with my father on
      his sail boat when I was a child before he had to give it up. I am
      now in the Army and live in Germany while I'm not deployed to
      beautiful Mesopotamia like I am now.

      Thanks again for all the advice, I look forward to continuing to
      learn from all of you.

      Pat






      Lindsey
      Board Member IGKTPAB


      [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
    • Vince Brennan
      Yet another tip on this: I buy cyanoacrylate in large bottles (2oz) on Ebay, half-dozen at a time.... I use this to coat the ends of whatever I m working
      Message 2 of 17 , Jul 8, 2006
      • 0 Attachment
        Yet another tip on this: I buy cyanoacrylate in large bottles (2oz)
        on Ebay, half-dozen at a time.... I use this to coat the ends of
        whatever I'm working on.... a small dab will keep line from unlaying
        when doing square-knot work (as the ends are pulled through over and
        over again) and I find that coating an inch or two of the working end
        is just as useful (if not moreso) than the permalock needles when
        using small (#9 through #21) cotton line for doing turksheads and the
        like. Just be sure you have a piece of old rug or something under you
        to catch the inevitable drips. I use cheap rag-rug runners from the
        dollar-stores and toss em after a month or so.

        Since I don't use nylon, I can't speak as to the glue's efficacy on
        that material, but I suspect it would take a few hours of curing time.
        The cotton cures up in about ten-fifteen seconds and, after clipping
        the end oblique with a pair of snips to get a point, you're more than
        good-to-go. (You don't lose permaloks, either.)

        Lindsey Philpott <pilgrimsailor@...> wrote:
        >
        > Hi Pat,
        >
        > If you cannot get the perma-lok needles then at least (or anyway)
        get some drafting tape. It is very useful as a temporary whipping and
        helps to guide fine cords through any of the more complex knots, while
        keeping things together. Also, it helps by taping down the cords to a
        pattern instead of T-pins, although T-pins are my favorite tool when
        using flat patterns.
        >
        > Lindsey
        >
        > Patrick <pmhenrich@...> wrote:
        > Thanks so much to everyone for all the great advice. I've
        looked at
        > a lot of the books recommended already. ABOK seems like a great
        > reference, but as has been pointed out, also seems to be a
        > bit "heavy" to actually learn and expand to an intermediate level.
        > I'm sure I'll be getting this one some day, that day just probably
        > isn't today.
        >
        > I've done a fair amount of surfing around old posts and everything
        > else I can find. It seems to me the most important tools to start
        > out with are a marlinespike and some of the perm-a-lok needles
        > everone is so keen on. Is there anything else needed for a starter
        > kit? Besides a quality knife of course.
        >
        > To answer all the questions about location. I'm actually from
        > Seattle, WA and learned a lot of the knots I know with my father on
        > his sail boat when I was a child before he had to give it up. I am
        > now in the Army and live in Germany while I'm not deployed to
        > beautiful Mesopotamia like I am now.
        >
        > Thanks again for all the advice, I look forward to continuing to
        > learn from all of you.
        >
        > Pat
        >
        >
        >
        >
        >
        >
        > Lindsey
        > Board Member IGKTPAB
        >
        >
        > [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
        >
      • Eddie Climo
        Hi Vince, That use of cyanoacrylate looks like such a useful tip that [I hope this is OK with you?] I ve included it in the relevant introductory chapter of
        Message 3 of 17 , Jul 9, 2006
        • 0 Attachment
          Hi Vince,
          That use of cyanoacrylate looks like such a useful tip that [I hope this is OK with you?] I've
          included it in the relevant introductory chapter of the Turk's Head book I'm writing, and given
          your name with a wee 'thank you'. I've attached a few pages (as an Acrobat PDF file, so you can
          see what I've written; it's halfway down p. 24. And, in case you're interested, the photo of the
          hollow fids that I devised (p.23) has enough resolution that you can zoom in and read the
          description of how they're made.

          I've also mentioned your web site in the Bibliography, where it says:
          ... ...
          Frayed Knot Arts—knotwork by Vince Brennan
          http://www.frayedknotarts.com/index.html
          Free tutorials, a Library of other people’s fancy knotwork, and detailed photos of work for sale
          (belts, musical instrument straps, lanyards, ships’ wheels covered, buttons, finger- and
          ear-rings, needle cases).
          ... ...
          Is that OK with you, or would you like the wording changed?

          Finally, the book has a Gallery chapter, featuring a few Turk's Heads, Pineapple Knots or other
          woven knots tied by a dozen or so different knotters, along with a brief bio and the address of
          any sites or online photo albums they have. This is to give the readers a sample of some of the
          best things people are tying these days; it's not so much a question of how advanced the knots are
          (although some are real humdingers!) but how well they're tied.

          Now, here's the question: would you be willing to send me a few photos for inclusion in this
          Gallery? I'd be after a few items which you're fond of yourself, perhaps some unusual woven knots,
          or one of those ship's wheels you do, even a square-knotted belt for a bit of variety. Let me know
          your views, eh?

          By the way, I've been having lots of fun with the big Graumont book you sent me, and it's given me
          some good insights for my own writing. I recently got a copy of his smaller 'Handbook of Knots' on
          eBay, and that's pretty good too.

          Take care, amigo,

          Eddie


          --- Vince Brennan <music@...> wrote:

          > Yet another tip on this: I buy cyanoacrylate in large bottles (2oz)
          > on Ebay, half-dozen at a time.... I use this to coat the ends of
          > whatever I'm working on.... a small dab will keep line from unlaying
          > when doing square-knot work (as the ends are pulled through over and
          > over again) and I find that coating an inch or two of the working end
          > is just as useful (if not moreso) than the permalock needles when
          > using small (#9 through #21) cotton line for doing turksheads and the
          > like. Just be sure you have a piece of old rug or something under you
          > to catch the inevitable drips. I use cheap rag-rug runners from the
          > dollar-stores and toss em after a month or so.
          >
          > Since I don't use nylon, I can't speak as to the glue's efficacy on
          > that material, but I suspect it would take a few hours of curing time.
          > The cotton cures up in about ten-fifteen seconds and, after clipping
          > the end oblique with a pair of snips to get a point, you're more than
          > good-to-go. (You don't lose permaloks, either.

          Eddie Climo
          eddie_climo@...



          ___________________________________________________________
          Yahoo! Messenger - with free PC-PC calling and photo sharing. http://uk.messenger.yahoo.com

          [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
        • Vince Brennan
          Well, first of all, thanks for the inclusion... quite chuffed over that, I am! As to pictures, I d be glad to contribute whatever you d like, so look thru
          Message 4 of 17 , Jul 10, 2006
          • 0 Attachment
            Well, first of all, thanks for the inclusion... quite chuffed over
            that, I am!

            As to pictures, I'd be glad to contribute whatever you'd like, so
            look thru the site and see if anything appeals to you in particular.
            ~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~

            A further tip on the cyanoacrylate:

            PLEASE don't (and don't laugh, but I've bloody done this!) do this in
            a small, closed room or directly under your face so the fumes hit your
            nose or eyes! It's awful stuff if you breathe it in and WILL damage
            your lungs - and on not too much exposure, neither!

            Also, most CA bottles you get on Ebay or elsewhere will have an
            applicator tip attached made of Teflon or some such slippery
            polymer... USE it. It will keep you from over-wetting the work and
            having drips come off the ends (that's why the rug under your
            work....saves the floor and your domestic harmony) and also makes the
            stuff go farther. I run through six bottles every two months or so.

            I did a few tests on some nylon cord I have.... it uniformly does not
            want to set up very quickly on nylon for some reason and is only
            slightly faster on a dacron line.... cotton/dacron is faster yet, but
            the minimum time seems to be ten to fifteen minutes for a hard set,
            where cotton lines (like those supplied by Marty Combs) will set up
            hard and ready for trimming within thirty seconds at most. It also
            sets quickly on the CARDOC builder's cotton cord available in Blighty.

            You absolutely want to get a bottle of "de-bonder" as well, for use in
            emergency situations. (Sneezing is not recommended while using CA and
            the de-bonder got the denims off a certain portion of my anatomy,
            albeit with (ahem) some discomfort.

            Sorry if I seem to be banging on about this, but it is SUCH a
            time-saver when doing small turksheads and other fancywork that I've
            completely stopped using hollow fids and permalock needles and only
            need the pricker to provide clearance for the sharp end of the line to
            penetrate the work...
            ~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~
            Since you mentioned Graumont, here's another tip: The entire
            contents of PC Herwig's Vol 1,2 & 3 seem to be contained therein, so
            unless you're a completist and just want the actual pamphlets for your
            collection, you can kill two sturds with one bone by getting a copy
            of The Encyclopaedia of Knots and Fancy Ropework. Just be sure to
            check over the index section: the copy I sent you (as you know) was
            missing eight pages and that can be a real handicap when looking for a
            specific item.
            ~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~



            --- In knottyers@yahoogroups.com, Eddie Climo <eddie_climo@...> wrote:
            >
            > Hi Vince,
            > That use of cyanoacrylate looks like such a useful tip that [I hope
            this is OK with you?] I've
            > included it in the relevant introductory chapter of the Turk's Head
            book I'm writing, and given
            > your name with a wee 'thank you'. I've attached a few pages (as an
            Acrobat PDF file, so you can
            > see what I've written; it's halfway down p. 24. And, in case you're
            interested, the photo of the
            > hollow fids that I devised (p.23) has enough resolution that you can
            zoom in and read the
            > description of how they're made.
            >
            > I've also mentioned your web site in the Bibliography, where it says:
            > ... ...
            > Frayed Knot Arts—knotwork by Vince Brennan
            > http://www.frayedknotarts.com/index.html
            > Free tutorials, a Library of other people's fancy knotwork, and
            detailed photos of work for sale
            > (belts, musical instrument straps, lanyards, ships' wheels
            covered, buttons, finger- and
            > ear-rings, needle cases).
            > ... ...
            > Is that OK with you, or would you like the wording changed?
            >
            > Finally, the book has a Gallery chapter, featuring a few Turk's
            Heads, Pineapple Knots or other
            > woven knots tied by a dozen or so different knotters, along with a
            brief bio and the address of
            > any sites or online photo albums they have. This is to give the
            readers a sample of some of the
            > best things people are tying these days; it's not so much a question
            of how advanced the knots are
            > (although some are real humdingers!) but how well they're tied.
            >
            > Now, here's the question: would you be willing to send me a few
            photos for inclusion in this
            > Gallery? I'd be after a few items which you're fond of yourself,
            perhaps some unusual woven knots,
            > or one of those ship's wheels you do, even a square-knotted belt for
            a bit of variety. Let me know
            > your views, eh?
            >
            > By the way, I've been having lots of fun with the big Graumont book
            you sent me, and it's given me
            > some good insights for my own writing. I recently got a copy of his
            smaller 'Handbook of Knots' on
            > eBay, and that's pretty good too.
            >
            > Take care, amigo,
            >
            > Eddie
          • Fred Dant
            Vince I,ve never tried cyanoacrylate. But after all of this I will have to give it a try. Where is the best site to get it from? Fred Dant ... From: Vince
            Message 5 of 17 , Jul 11, 2006
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              Vince
              I,ve never tried cyanoacrylate.
              But after all of this I will have to give it a try. Where is the best site to get it from?
              Fred Dant
              ----- Original Message -----
              From: Vince Brennan
              To: knottyers@yahoogroups.com
              Sent: Monday, July 10, 2006 5:46 PM
              Subject: [KnotTyers] Re: Using Cyanoacrylate


              Well, first of all, thanks for the inclusion... quite chuffed over
              that, I am!

              As to pictures, I'd be glad to contribute whatever you'd like, so
              look thru the site and see if anything appeals to you in particular.
              ~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~

              A further tip on the cyanoacrylate:

              PLEASE don't (and don't laugh, but I've bloody done this!) do this in
              a small, closed room or directly under your face so the fumes hit your
              nose or eyes! It's awful stuff if you breathe it in and WILL damage
              your lungs - and on not too much exposure, neither!

              Also, most CA bottles you get on Ebay or elsewhere will have an
              applicator tip attached made of Teflon or some such slippery
              polymer... USE it. It will keep you from over-wetting the work and
              having drips come off the ends (that's why the rug under your
              work....saves the floor and your domestic harmony) and also makes the
              stuff go farther. I run through six bottles every two months or so.

              I did a few tests on some nylon cord I have.... it uniformly does not
              want to set up very quickly on nylon for some reason and is only
              slightly faster on a dacron line.... cotton/dacron is faster yet, but
              the minimum time seems to be ten to fifteen minutes for a hard set,
              where cotton lines (like those supplied by Marty Combs) will set up
              hard and ready for trimming within thirty seconds at most. It also
              sets quickly on the CARDOC builder's cotton cord available in Blighty.

              You absolutely want to get a bottle of "de-bonder" as well, for use in
              emergency situations. (Sneezing is not recommended while using CA and
              the de-bonder got the denims off a certain portion of my anatomy,
              albeit with (ahem) some discomfort.

              Sorry if I seem to be banging on about this, but it is SUCH a
              time-saver when doing small turksheads and other fancywork that I've
              completely stopped using hollow fids and permalock needles and only
              need the pricker to provide clearance for the sharp end of the line to
              penetrate the work...
              ~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~
              Since you mentioned Graumont, here's another tip: The entire
              contents of PC Herwig's Vol 1,2 & 3 seem to be contained therein, so
              unless you're a completist and just want the actual pamphlets for your
              collection, you can kill two sturds with one bone by getting a copy
              of The Encyclopaedia of Knots and Fancy Ropework. Just be sure to
              check over the index section: the copy I sent you (as you know) was
              missing eight pages and that can be a real handicap when looking for a
              specific item.
              ~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~

              --- In knottyers@yahoogroups.com, Eddie Climo <eddie_climo@...> wrote:
              >
              > Hi Vince,
              > That use of cyanoacrylate looks like such a useful tip that [I hope
              this is OK with you?] I've
              > included it in the relevant introductory chapter of the Turk's Head
              book I'm writing, and given
              > your name with a wee 'thank you'. I've attached a few pages (as an
              Acrobat PDF file, so you can
              > see what I've written; it's halfway down p. 24. And, in case you're
              interested, the photo of the
              > hollow fids that I devised (p.23) has enough resolution that you can
              zoom in and read the
              > description of how they're made.
              >
              > I've also mentioned your web site in the Bibliography, where it says:
              > ... ...
              > Frayed Knot Arts-knotwork by Vince Brennan
              > http://www.frayedknotarts.com/index.html
              > Free tutorials, a Library of other people's fancy knotwork, and
              detailed photos of work for sale
              > (belts, musical instrument straps, lanyards, ships' wheels
              covered, buttons, finger- and
              > ear-rings, needle cases).
              > ... ...
              > Is that OK with you, or would you like the wording changed?
              >
              > Finally, the book has a Gallery chapter, featuring a few Turk's
              Heads, Pineapple Knots or other
              > woven knots tied by a dozen or so different knotters, along with a
              brief bio and the address of
              > any sites or online photo albums they have. This is to give the
              readers a sample of some of the
              > best things people are tying these days; it's not so much a question
              of how advanced the knots are
              > (although some are real humdingers!) but how well they're tied.
              >
              > Now, here's the question: would you be willing to send me a few
              photos for inclusion in this
              > Gallery? I'd be after a few items which you're fond of yourself,
              perhaps some unusual woven knots,
              > or one of those ship's wheels you do, even a square-knotted belt for
              a bit of variety. Let me know
              > your views, eh?
              >
              > By the way, I've been having lots of fun with the big Graumont book
              you sent me, and it's given me
              > some good insights for my own writing. I recently got a copy of his
              smaller 'Handbook of Knots' on
              > eBay, and that's pretty good too.
              >
              > Take care, amigo,
              >
              > Eddie





              [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
            • André
              Hi Eddie, Please keep in mind that this cuanoacrylate can be very dangerous to the eyes and skin. this kind of glue is also known under the name of 10 seconds
              Message 6 of 17 , Jul 11, 2006
              • 0 Attachment
                Hi Eddie,

                Please keep in mind that this cuanoacrylate can be very dangerous to
                the eyes and skin. this kind of glue is also known under the name of
                "10 seconds glue" . You can really glue your fingers together with it
                and separating them will be a real pain (literaly). I think a serious
                warning about it's use is in place here.

                take care
                André
                --- In knottyers@yahoogroups.com, Eddie Climo <eddie_climo@...> wrote:
                >
                > Hi Vince,
                > That use of cyanoacrylate looks like such a useful tip that [I hope
                this is OK with you?] I've
                > included it in the relevant introductory chapter of the Turk's Head
                book I'm writing, and given
                > your name with a wee 'thank you'. I've attached a few pages (as an
                Acrobat PDF file, so you can
                > see what I've written; it's halfway down p. 24. And, in case you're
                interested, the photo of the
                > hollow fids that I devised (p.23) has enough resolution that you
                can zoom in and read the
                > description of how they're made.
                >
                > I've also mentioned your web site in the Bibliography, where it
                says:
                > ... ...
                > Frayed Knot Arts—knotwork by Vince Brennan
                > http://www.frayedknotarts.com/index.html
                > Free tutorials, a Library of other people's fancy knotwork,
                and detailed photos of work for sale
                > (belts, musical instrument straps, lanyards,
                ships' wheels covered, buttons, finger- and
                > ear-rings, needle cases).
                > ... ...
                > Is that OK with you, or would you like the wording changed?
                >
                > Finally, the book has a Gallery chapter, featuring a few Turk's
                Heads, Pineapple Knots or other
                > woven knots tied by a dozen or so different knotters, along with a
                brief bio and the address of
                > any sites or online photo albums they have. This is to give the
                readers a sample of some of the
                > best things people are tying these days; it's not so much a
                question of how advanced the knots are
                > (although some are real humdingers!) but how well they're tied.
                >
                > Now, here's the question: would you be willing to send me a few
                photos for inclusion in this
                > Gallery? I'd be after a few items which you're fond of yourself,
                perhaps some unusual woven knots,
                > or one of those ship's wheels you do, even a square-knotted belt
                for a bit of variety. Let me know
                > your views, eh?
                >
                > By the way, I've been having lots of fun with the big Graumont book
                you sent me, and it's given me
                > some good insights for my own writing. I recently got a copy of his
                smaller 'Handbook of Knots' on
                > eBay, and that's pretty good too.
                >
                > Take care, amigo,
                >
                > Eddie
                >
                >
                > --- Vince Brennan <music@...> wrote:
                >
                > > Yet another tip on this: I buy cyanoacrylate in large bottles
                (2oz)
                > > on Ebay, half-dozen at a time.... I use this to coat the ends of
                > > whatever I'm working on.... a small dab will keep line from
                unlaying
                > > when doing square-knot work (as the ends are pulled through over
                and
                > > over again) and I find that coating an inch or two of the working
                end
                > > is just as useful (if not moreso) than the permalock needles when
                > > using small (#9 through #21) cotton line for doing turksheads and
                the
                > > like. Just be sure you have a piece of old rug or something under
                you
                > > to catch the inevitable drips. I use cheap rag-rug runners from
                the
                > > dollar-stores and toss em after a month or so.
                > >
                > > Since I don't use nylon, I can't speak as to the glue's efficacy
                on
                > > that material, but I suspect it would take a few hours of curing
                time.
                > > The cotton cures up in about ten-fifteen seconds and, after
                clipping
                > > the end oblique with a pair of snips to get a point, you're more
                than
                > > good-to-go. (You don't lose permaloks, either.
                >
                > Eddie Climo
                > eddie_climo@...
                >
                >
                >
                > ___________________________________________________________
                > Yahoo! Messenger - with free PC-PC calling and photo sharing. http:/
                /uk.messenger.yahoo.com
                >
                > [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
                >
              • Vince Brennan
                Well spoken, Andre! Again, the cyanoacrylate IS a nasty substance and can do you lasting physical harm if misused or used with inattention, so be careful,
                Message 7 of 17 , Jul 11, 2006
                • 0 Attachment
                  Well spoken, Andre! Again, the cyanoacrylate IS a nasty substance and
                  can do you lasting physical harm if misused or used with inattention,
                  so be careful, don't breath in the fumes and get some debonder for
                  those glued-together fingers.

                  Now I think we've banged this one to death, so on to the next pressing
                  subject? (Ironing?)

                  I'm in the process of adding another tutorial page to the square-knot
                  belts section of the website and it should be up by 0300Z or so... all
                  the pics are done and sized, the only thing left is to write the prose
                  and stick it on-line. This one is on making a ten-diamond feature in
                  a large square-knot feild. Hope you all can enjoy it.

                  http://www.frayedknotarts.com/how2belt.html should be the last page
                  on the list. Gimme a few hours and it'll be up.



                  --- In knottyers@yahoogroups.com, André <salmaj@...> wrote:
                  >
                  > Hi Eddie,
                  >
                  > Please keep in mind that this cuanoacrylate can be very dangerous to
                  > the eyes and skin. this kind of glue is also known under the name of
                  > "10 seconds glue" . You can really glue your fingers together with it
                  > and separating them will be a real pain (literaly). I think a serious
                  > warning about it's use is in place here.
                  >
                  > take care
                  > André
                  > --- In knottyers@yahoogroups.com, Eddie Climo <eddie_climo@> wrote:
                  > >
                  > > Hi Vince,
                  > > That use of cyanoacrylate looks like such a useful tip that [I hope
                  > this is OK with you?] I've
                  > > included it in the relevant introductory chapter of the Turk's Head
                  > book I'm writing, and given
                  > > your name with a wee 'thank you'. I've attached a few pages (as an
                  > Acrobat PDF file, so you can
                  > > see what I've written; it's halfway down p. 24. And, in case you're
                  > interested, the photo of the
                  > > hollow fids that I devised (p.23) has enough resolution that you
                  > can zoom in and read the
                  > > description of how they're made.
                  > >
                  > > I've also mentioned your web site in the Bibliography, where it
                  > says:
                  > > ... ...
                  > > Frayed Knot Arts—knotwork by Vince Brennan
                  > > http://www.frayedknotarts.com/index.html
                  > > Free tutorials, a Library of other people's fancy knotwork,
                  > and detailed photos of work for sale
                  > > (belts, musical instrument straps, lanyards,
                  > ships' wheels covered, buttons, finger- and
                  > > ear-rings, needle cases).
                  > > ... ...
                  > > Is that OK with you, or would you like the wording changed?
                  > >
                  > > Finally, the book has a Gallery chapter, featuring a few Turk's
                  > Heads, Pineapple Knots or other
                  > > woven knots tied by a dozen or so different knotters, along with a
                  > brief bio and the address of
                  > > any sites or online photo albums they have. This is to give the
                  > readers a sample of some of the
                  > > best things people are tying these days; it's not so much a
                  > question of how advanced the knots are
                  > > (although some are real humdingers!) but how well they're tied.
                  > >
                  > > Now, here's the question: would you be willing to send me a few
                  > photos for inclusion in this
                  > > Gallery? I'd be after a few items which you're fond of yourself,
                  > perhaps some unusual woven knots,
                  > > or one of those ship's wheels you do, even a square-knotted belt
                  > for a bit of variety. Let me know
                  > > your views, eh?
                  > >
                  > > By the way, I've been having lots of fun with the big Graumont book
                  > you sent me, and it's given me
                  > > some good insights for my own writing. I recently got a copy of his
                  > smaller 'Handbook of Knots' on
                  > > eBay, and that's pretty good too.
                  > >
                  > > Take care, amigo,
                  > >
                  > > Eddie
                  > >
                  > >
                  > > --- Vince Brennan <music@> wrote:
                  > >
                  > > > Yet another tip on this: I buy cyanoacrylate in large bottles
                  > (2oz)
                  > > > on Ebay, half-dozen at a time.... I use this to coat the ends of
                  > > > whatever I'm working on.... a small dab will keep line from
                  > unlaying
                  > > > when doing square-knot work (as the ends are pulled through over
                  > and
                  > > > over again) and I find that coating an inch or two of the working
                  > end
                  > > > is just as useful (if not moreso) than the permalock needles when
                  > > > using small (#9 through #21) cotton line for doing turksheads and
                  > the
                  > > > like. Just be sure you have a piece of old rug or something under
                  > you
                  > > > to catch the inevitable drips. I use cheap rag-rug runners from
                  > the
                  > > > dollar-stores and toss em after a month or so.
                  > > >
                  > > > Since I don't use nylon, I can't speak as to the glue's efficacy
                  > on
                  > > > that material, but I suspect it would take a few hours of curing
                  > time.
                  > > > The cotton cures up in about ten-fifteen seconds and, after
                  > clipping
                  > > > the end oblique with a pair of snips to get a point, you're more
                  > than
                  > > > good-to-go. (You don't lose permaloks, either.
                  > >
                  > > Eddie Climo
                  > > eddie_climo@
                  > >
                  > >
                  > >
                  > > ___________________________________________________________
                  > > Yahoo! Messenger - with free PC-PC calling and photo sharing. http:/
                  > /uk.messenger.yahoo.com
                  > >
                  > > [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
                  > >
                  >
                • Seema
                  the web link is amazing - thanks great job ... From: Vince Brennan To: knottyers@yahoogroups.com Sent: Wednesday, July 12, 2006 6:19 AM Subject: [KnotTyers]
                  Message 8 of 17 , Jul 11, 2006
                  • 0 Attachment
                    the web link is amazing - thanks

                    great job

                    ----- Original Message -----
                    From: Vince Brennan
                    To: knottyers@yahoogroups.com
                    Sent: Wednesday, July 12, 2006 6:19 AM
                    Subject: [KnotTyers] Re: Using Cyanoacrylate


                    Well spoken, Andre! Again, the cyanoacrylate IS a nasty substance and
                    can do you lasting physical harm if misused or used with inattention,
                    so be careful, don't breath in the fumes and get some debonder for
                    those glued-together fingers.

                    Now I think we've banged this one to death, so on to the next pressing
                    subject? (Ironing?)

                    I'm in the process of adding another tutorial page to the square-knot
                    belts section of the website and it should be up by 0300Z or so... all
                    the pics are done and sized, the only thing left is to write the prose
                    and stick it on-line. This one is on making a ten-diamond feature in
                    a large square-knot feild. Hope you all can enjoy it.

                    http://www.frayedknotarts.com/how2belt.html should be the last page
                    on the list. Gimme a few hours and it'll be up.

                    --- In knottyers@yahoogroups.com, André <salmaj@...> wrote:
                    >
                    > Hi Eddie,
                    >
                    > Please keep in mind that this cuanoacrylate can be very dangerous to
                    > the eyes and skin. this kind of glue is also known under the name of
                    > "10 seconds glue" . You can really glue your fingers together with it
                    > and separating them will be a real pain (literaly). I think a serious
                    > warning about it's use is in place here.
                    >
                    > take care
                    > André
                    > --- In knottyers@yahoogroups.com, Eddie Climo <eddie_climo@> wrote:
                    > >
                    > > Hi Vince,
                    > > That use of cyanoacrylate looks like such a useful tip that [I hope
                    > this is OK with you?] I've
                    > > included it in the relevant introductory chapter of the Turk's Head
                    > book I'm writing, and given
                    > > your name with a wee 'thank you'. I've attached a few pages (as an
                    > Acrobat PDF file, so you can
                    > > see what I've written; it's halfway down p. 24. And, in case you're
                    > interested, the photo of the
                    > > hollow fids that I devised (p.23) has enough resolution that you
                    > can zoom in and read the
                    > > description of how they're made.
                    > >
                    > > I've also mentioned your web site in the Bibliography, where it
                    > says:
                    > > ... ...
                    > > Frayed Knot Arts-knotwork by Vince Brennan
                    > > http://www.frayedknotarts.com/index.html
                    > > Free tutorials, a Library of other people's fancy knotwork,
                    > and detailed photos of work for sale
                    > > (belts, musical instrument straps, lanyards,
                    > ships' wheels covered, buttons, finger- and
                    > > ear-rings, needle cases).
                    > > ... ...
                    > > Is that OK with you, or would you like the wording changed?
                    > >
                    > > Finally, the book has a Gallery chapter, featuring a few Turk's
                    > Heads, Pineapple Knots or other
                    > > woven knots tied by a dozen or so different knotters, along with a
                    > brief bio and the address of
                    > > any sites or online photo albums they have. This is to give the
                    > readers a sample of some of the
                    > > best things people are tying these days; it's not so much a
                    > question of how advanced the knots are
                    > > (although some are real humdingers!) but how well they're tied.
                    > >
                    > > Now, here's the question: would you be willing to send me a few
                    > photos for inclusion in this
                    > > Gallery? I'd be after a few items which you're fond of yourself,
                    > perhaps some unusual woven knots,
                    > > or one of those ship's wheels you do, even a square-knotted belt
                    > for a bit of variety. Let me know
                    > > your views, eh?
                    > >
                    > > By the way, I've been having lots of fun with the big Graumont book
                    > you sent me, and it's given me
                    > > some good insights for my own writing. I recently got a copy of his
                    > smaller 'Handbook of Knots' on
                    > > eBay, and that's pretty good too.
                    > >
                    > > Take care, amigo,
                    > >
                    > > Eddie
                    > >
                    > >
                    > > --- Vince Brennan <music@> wrote:
                    > >
                    > > > Yet another tip on this: I buy cyanoacrylate in large bottles
                    > (2oz)
                    > > > on Ebay, half-dozen at a time.... I use this to coat the ends of
                    > > > whatever I'm working on.... a small dab will keep line from
                    > unlaying
                    > > > when doing square-knot work (as the ends are pulled through over
                    > and
                    > > > over again) and I find that coating an inch or two of the working
                    > end
                    > > > is just as useful (if not moreso) than the permalock needles when
                    > > > using small (#9 through #21) cotton line for doing turksheads and
                    > the
                    > > > like. Just be sure you have a piece of old rug or something under
                    > you
                    > > > to catch the inevitable drips. I use cheap rag-rug runners from
                    > the
                    > > > dollar-stores and toss em after a month or so.
                    > > >
                    > > > Since I don't use nylon, I can't speak as to the glue's efficacy
                    > on
                    > > > that material, but I suspect it would take a few hours of curing
                    > time.
                    > > > The cotton cures up in about ten-fifteen seconds and, after
                    > clipping
                    > > > the end oblique with a pair of snips to get a point, you're more
                    > than
                    > > > good-to-go. (You don't lose permaloks, either.
                    > >
                    > > Eddie Climo
                    > > eddie_climo@
                    > >
                    > >
                    > >
                    > > __________________________________________________________
                    > > Yahoo! Messenger - with free PC-PC calling and photo sharing. http:/
                    > /uk.messenger.yahoo.com
                    > >
                    > > [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
                    > >
                    >





                    [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
                  • Steve
                    Cyanoacrylate is nothing more than what is commonly marketed as super glue . There are a number of brands widely distributed and available at hardware, big
                    Message 9 of 17 , Jul 12, 2006
                    • 0 Attachment
                      Cyanoacrylate is nothing more than what is commonly marketed as "super
                      glue". There are a number of brands widely distributed and available at
                      hardware, "big box" stores, hobby, and even large grocery stores. Bottles
                      are usually small, containing less than 1 oz.

                      All formulations I've seen are a form of liquid or gel. Only a little dab
                      is ever needed.

                      But, as mentioned, this glue seems to know no bounds. It will glue your
                      fingers together in seconds, requiring a special solvent to separate or a
                      knife to part your flesh! Beware!

                      Steve


                      > -----Original Message-----
                      > I,ve never tried cyanoacrylate.
                      > But after all of this I will have to give it a try. Where is
                      > the best site to get it from?
                    • arthur elwell
                      We are not finished beating this dead horse, yet. A trick used when gluing ceramics with super-glue is to wet one side. The water acts as a catalyst to speed
                      Message 10 of 17 , Jul 17, 2006
                      • 0 Attachment
                        We are not finished beating this dead horse, yet.

                        A trick used when gluing ceramics with super-glue is to wet one side. The water acts as a catalyst to speed up the chemical set-up. I use it with nylon and it does a really good job.

                        Art

                        Steve <shlawrence@...> wrote: Cyanoacrylate is nothing more than what is commonly marketed as "super
                        glue". There are a number of brands widely distributed and available at
                        hardware, "big box" stores, hobby, and even large grocery stores. Bottles
                        are usually small, containing less than 1 oz.

                        All formulations I've seen are a form of liquid or gel. Only a little dab
                        is ever needed.

                        But, as mentioned, this glue seems to know no bounds. It will glue your
                        fingers together in seconds, requiring a special solvent to separate or a
                        knife to part your flesh! Beware!

                        Steve


                        > -----Original Message-----
                        > I,ve never tried cyanoacrylate.
                        > But after all of this I will have to give it a try. Where is
                        > the best site to get it from?






                        Art Elwell, Knotical Engineer
                        Greendell, NJ 07839-0113


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