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Re: [KnotTyers] right/left twist

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  • OldManMoo
    Hello wefnut, Do you have a copy of Ashley s Book Of Knots? Reading along in this book and finding out about how rope acts in certain situations is a valuable
    Message 1 of 5 , Feb 28, 2005
      Hello wefnut,
      Do you have a copy of Ashley's Book Of Knots? Reading along in this book and finding out about how
      rope acts in certain situations is a valuable bit of powerful info! I have found most of the
      questions that I have had about bindings, hitchings, whippings, and tie-offs...have been answered
      just browsing in the book. The assortment of knots, and the hi quality of images in this book,
      have given me many choices along the query of my needs. I haven't had to do many end whippings, so
      I am not an authority on the subject. I just end up "lookin' in da book"! Someone else here may
      have the answer for your specific needs...take care...Moooooo

      =====
      Life without the blues is only a life half lived!



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    • Kenneth Chan
      1) The rope is horizontal in front of me. The strands are slanting up and to the right. This is a right twisted rope, correct?? I think its called hawser laid
      Message 2 of 5 , Mar 1, 2005
        1) The rope is horizontal in front of me. The strands are slanting
        up and to the right. This is a right twisted rope, correct??

        I think its called hawser laid or Z-laid rope.

        2) A right twisted rope should be coiled clockwise; correct? (Left
        twist - counterclockwise)

        Thats what I do. Hawser laid rope has to be uncoiled anti clockwise
        or else you'll untwist the strands.

        3) A rope should be whipped so that the whipping tightens the
        twist in the rope, correct?

        The rope should be whipped in such a way that as the strands try to
        unlay themselves the whipping gets tighter.
        Eg. Whip in a clockwise direction for hawser laid rope.

        4) One website said that the way you tie a knot should depend
        on the twist of the rope. If that is true, how should a taughtline
        hitch be tied? I see two options for making the bight (standing
        end to runnning end clockwise or counter-clockwise) and the
        rest follows. Is there a general rule about all knots?

        Hmm... Never thought of it. Usually just tie knots the right handed
        way. I'll go try and see the results. Anybody know the answer to
        this?

        --- In knottyers@yahoogroups.com, "wefnut" <wefnut@y...> wrote:
        >
        > While looking for some images to make a handout for a knot
        > tying workshop, I found some interesting stuff, got hooked,
        > learned how to splice (its easier than I thought) and ended up
        > here.
        >
        > I have some questions about right and left twisted rope.
        >
        > 1) The rope is horizontal in front of me. The strands are slanting
        > up and to the right. This is a right twisted rope, correct??
        >
        > 2) A right twisted rope should be coiled clockwise; correct? (Left
        > twist - counterclockwise)
        >
        > 3) A rope should be whipped so that the whipping tightens the
        > twist in the rope, correct?
        >
        > 4) One website said that the way you tie a knot should depend
        > on the twist of the rope. If that is true, how should a taughtline
        > hitch be tied? I see two options for making the bight (standing
        > end to runnning end clockwise or counter-clockwise) and the
        > rest follows. Is there a general rule about all knots?
        >
        > I've been using knots ever since Boy Scouts. I know more about
        > rope and knots than most folks. (Hence the choice of me to give
        > the workshop.) I won't let my new found ignorance interfere with
        > a lifetime of experience, but seek enlightenment.
      • April
        Just got home last night from a 4 day cruise off California through islands., should have used more sun screen, when we coil we don t care what angle the
        Message 3 of 5 , Mar 1, 2005
          Just got home last night from a 4 day cruise off California through
          islands., should have used more sun screen, when we coil we don't care
          what angle the rope is wrapped. If it has been done the same way for a
          while it gets a memory. If it ends up with a slight figure 8 that is fine..
          we continue and then tie it off with the last few wraps. I am left handed
          and often if a rope has a "right handed" memory, coiling it left handed will
          remove the "memory" and it will coil without a figure 8. That is fine too.
          the purpose of our coiling is to get these lines going, keep them dry and be
          ready to sail. They of course are not triple wrap rope unless it is some
          part of the rode. Still, any line can get memory.



          April



          [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
        • wefnut
          Thanks. This makes sense. If the whipping is a nut and the rope a bolt, they will stay together better if they are threaded differently.
          Message 4 of 5 , Mar 2, 2005
            Thanks. This makes sense. If the whipping is a nut and the rope a
            bolt, they will stay together better if they are threaded differently.



            --- In knottyers@yahoogroups.com, "Kenneth Chan" <ken_nerve@y...>
            wrote:
            >
            > 3) A rope should be whipped so that the whipping tightens the
            > twist in the rope, correct?
            >
            > The rope should be whipped in such a way that as the strands try to
            > unlay themselves the whipping gets tighter.
            > Eg. Whip in a clockwise direction for hawser laid rope.
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