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Ashley End Papers

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  • donsimpson27609
    I have noticed that the newer editions of Ashley no longer contain the wonderful photos of sea chests as end papers. I have scanned mine and uploaded them to
    Message 1 of 15 , Feb 6, 2003
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      I have noticed that the newer editions of Ashley no longer
      contain the wonderful photos of sea chests as end papers. I have
      scanned mine and uploaded them to the files section. I am sorry
      that they had to be so big but too much resolution was lost when I
      cut them down much past a half a meg.
      Incidentally, my copy of Ashley is a first edition, published in
      1944 by Country Life Press, Garden City NY. I wonder if anyone
      knows when they deleted the end papers?

      Don
    • almac882@aol.com
      I have the 1944 edition also. It s a shame if they left out those great photos of authentic sea chests and beckets. Thanks for the upload. It should be of
      Message 2 of 15 , Feb 6, 2003
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        I have the 1944 edition also. It's a shame if they left out those great
        photos of authentic sea chests and beckets. Thanks for the upload. It should
        be of value to anyone researching these items.

        Allen


        [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
      • Cahn <cahn_au@hotmail.com>
        I am the proud owner of two copies of ABOK. The one I have with me at this moment was printed in 1981 and it contains the end papers you speak of. Having had a
        Message 3 of 15 , Feb 10, 2003
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          I am the proud owner of two copies of ABOK. The one I have with me
          at this moment was printed in 1981 and it contains the end papers
          you speak of.

          Having had a good look at them, and some of the wonderful inspiring
          work of other members here, I think I will start taking steps to
          make a complete sea chest with beckets and inlays.

          Regards
          Cahn
        • Howard Gibbins
          Greetings: After receiving Cahn s message I went and had a look at my copy of Ashley. It doesn t have any publication data - very curious. I know I got it in
          Message 4 of 15 , Feb 10, 2003
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            Greetings:

            After receiving Cahn's message I went and had a look at my copy of
            Ashley. It doesn't have any publication data - very curious. I know I
            got it in 1976 and it has the endpapers however.

            Does anyone on the list happen to have the normal dimensions etc. for a
            sea chest, as I like the idea of making one as well?

            Howard
            --
            53 Deg. 33 Min North Latitude
            113 Deg. 29 Min. West Longitude

            Website: http://www.telusplanet.net/public/hgibbins
          • Larry <lbtmoo@yahoo.com>
            ... copy of ... know I ... dimensions etc. for a ... Howard, I read in one book that referred to a Chest of your own dimensions. I would suggest maybe the
            Message 5 of 15 , Feb 10, 2003
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              --- In knottyers@yahoogroups.com, Howard Gibbins
              <hgibbins@t...> wrote:
              > Greetings:
              >
              > After receiving Cahn's message I went and had a look at my
              copy of
              > Ashley. It doesn't have any publication data - very curious. I
              know I
              > got it in 1976 and it has the endpapers however.
              >
              > Does anyone on the list happen to have the normal
              dimensions etc. for a
              > sea chest, as I like the idea of making one as well?
              >
              > Howard

              Howard,
              I read in one book that referred to a "Chest of your own
              dimensions." I would suggest maybe the size of a footlocker, but
              a bit taller to serve as a seat in small quarters when needed.
              One suggest also is that these chests were stowed against a
              wall. A lot of pics I have seen have the sides slightly angled
              inward at the top. This is ok, but you may make the back at 90
              degree to fit flush to the wall or wherever. This is for lashing in
              rough weather a tight fit to the wall. Don't want the thing flying
              about in a storm and spillin' yer goodies! I haven't seen any
              particular joints at the edges, so I guess these items were made
              by the individual, unless of course you were a ranking officer or
              such, whereas you kinda made your own instead of purchasing
              from the ship's carpenter a custom made one. Have fun!
            • almac882@aol.com
              I read some where that the bunks in the forecastle of a sailing ship were six feet long. Two chests set end-to-end in front of a set of bunks would total six
              Message 6 of 15 , Feb 11, 2003
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                I read some where that the bunks in the forecastle of a sailing ship were six feet long. Two chests set end-to-end in front of a set of bunks would total six feet, or a bit less than three feet per chest. Hope this helps.

                Allen
              • signin3599 <rmr3599@att.net>
                If you do a search for whalers Chest at the Popular Woodworking website you will come up with the plans that are available to purchase for a sea chest. The
                Message 7 of 15 , Feb 11, 2003
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                  If you do a search for "whalers Chest" at the Popular Woodworking
                  website you will come up with the plans that are available to purchase
                  for a sea chest. The chest is approx 3' long and @14" tall and @18 to
                  20" deep.. The plans are complete that they show you how to make the
                  rope handles and weave the turks head knots upon the rope gromets. The
                  chest itself is sloped on the front and has hand chiseled dovetail
                  joints in the corners of the chest.. It's a neat project that is
                  excellent looking.

                  The chest in the plans has the name of a ship called the Acushnet upon
                  it. Hope this helps..
                  --- In knottyers@yahoogroups.com, Howard Gibbins <hgibbins@t...> wrote:
                  > Greetings:
                  >
                  > After receiving Cahn's message I went and had a look at my copy of
                  > Ashley. It doesn't have any publication data - very curious. I know I
                  > got it in 1976 and it has the endpapers however.
                  >
                  > Does anyone on the list happen to have the normal dimensions etc. for a
                  > sea chest, as I like the idea of making one as well?
                  >
                  > Howard
                  > --
                  > 53 Deg. 33 Min North Latitude
                  > 113 Deg. 29 Min. West Longitude
                  >
                  > Website: http://www.telusplanet.net/public/hgibbins
                • somawas <somawas@yahoo.com>
                  Every source I ve ever seen on sea chests, including most of the chests illustrated on the Ashley end papers, call for dovetailed joints at the corners. These
                  Message 8 of 15 , Feb 11, 2003
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                    Every source I've ever seen on sea chests, including most of the
                    chests illustrated on the Ashley end papers, call for dovetailed
                    joints at the corners. These plans sound pretty authentic. What is
                    the URL?

                    --- In knottyers@yahoogroups.com, "signin3599 <rmr3599@a...>"
                    <rmr3599@a...> wrote:
                    > If you do a search for "whalers Chest" at the Popular Woodworking
                    > website you will come up with the plans that are available to
                    purchase
                    > for a sea chest. The chest is approx 3' long and @14" tall and @18
                    to
                    > 20" deep.. The plans are complete that they show you how to make
                    the
                    > rope handles and weave the turks head knots upon the rope gromets.
                    The
                    > chest itself is sloped on the front and has hand chiseled dovetail
                    > joints in the corners of the chest.. It's a neat project that is
                    > excellent looking.
                    >
                    > The chest in the plans has the name of a ship called the Acushnet
                    upon
                    > it. Hope this helps..
                    > --- In knottyers@yahoogroups.com, Howard Gibbins <hgibbins@t...>
                    wrote:
                    > > Greetings:
                    > >
                    > > After receiving Cahn's message I went and had a look at my copy
                    of
                    > > Ashley. It doesn't have any publication data - very curious. I
                    know I
                    > > got it in 1976 and it has the endpapers however.
                    > >
                    > > Does anyone on the list happen to have the normal dimensions
                    etc. for a
                    > > sea chest, as I like the idea of making one as well?
                    > >
                    > > Howard
                    > > --
                    > > 53 Deg. 33 Min North Latitude
                    > > 113 Deg. 29 Min. West Longitude
                    > >
                    > > Website: http://www.telusplanet.net/public/hgibbins
                  • signin3599 <rmr3599@att.net>
                    I didn t find the plans, I don t guess they are offered... you might be able to buy a back issue or find it at the library.. but the info is incluced here and
                    Message 9 of 15 , Feb 11, 2003
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                      I didn't find the plans, I don't guess they are offered... you might
                      be able to buy a back issue or find it at the library.. but the info
                      is incluced here and can be found at www.popularwoodworking.com

                      Title: Whaler's Sea Chest
                      Author: Robert Elmore
                      Issue Date: 1/1993 Volume Number: 70
                      Page number: 66 Article length: 5 pp.
                      Abstract:
                      This article will show you how to build a Whaler's Sea Chest that has
                      faded with the clipper and whaling ships. Article includes cutting
                      list, drawings, step photos, patterns from the PullOut Plans and
                      instructions for building the project. Also included is a sidebar on
                      "Making Rope Grommet Handles."

                      --- In knottyers@yahoogroups.com, "somawas <somawas@y...>"
                      <somawas@y...> wrote:
                      > Every source I've ever seen on sea chests, including most of the
                      > chests illustrated on the Ashley end papers, call for dovetailed
                      > joints at the corners. These plans sound pretty authentic. What is
                      > the URL?
                      >
                      > --- In knottyers@yahoogroups.com, "signin3599 <rmr3599@a...>"
                      > <rmr3599@a...> wrote:
                      > > If you do a search for "whalers Chest" at the Popular Woodworking
                      > > website you will come up with the plans that are available to
                      > purchase
                      > > for a sea chest. The chest is approx 3' long and @14" tall and @18
                      > to
                      > > 20" deep.. The plans are complete that they show you how to make
                      > the
                      > > rope handles and weave the turks head knots upon the rope gromets.
                      > The
                      > > chest itself is sloped on the front and has hand chiseled dovetail
                      > > joints in the corners of the chest.. It's a neat project that is
                      > > excellent looking.
                      > >
                      > > The chest in the plans has the name of a ship called the Acushnet
                      > upon
                      > > it. Hope this helps..
                      > > --- In knottyers@yahoogroups.com, Howard Gibbins <hgibbins@t...>
                      > wrote:
                      > > > Greetings:
                      > > >
                      > > > After receiving Cahn's message I went and had a look at my copy
                      > of
                      > > > Ashley. It doesn't have any publication data - very curious. I
                      > know I
                      > > > got it in 1976 and it has the endpapers however.
                      > > >
                      > > > Does anyone on the list happen to have the normal dimensions
                      > etc. for a
                      > > > sea chest, as I like the idea of making one as well?
                      > > >
                      > > > Howard
                      > > > --
                      > > > 53 Deg. 33 Min North Latitude
                      > > > 113 Deg. 29 Min. West Longitude
                      > > >
                      > > > Website: http://www.telusplanet.net/public/hgibbins
                    • signin3599 <rmr3599@att.net>
                      OK.. here is a link to my Sea Chest, it s the one in the Popular Woodworking mag, I cannot find the magazine but took some pix and some measurements. It s 32
                      Message 10 of 15 , Feb 11, 2003
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                        OK.. here is a link to my Sea Chest, it's the one in the Popular
                        Woodworking mag, I cannot find the magazine but took some pix and
                        some measurements. It's 32" total length, 13" tall, and 17" deep.
                        It's hard to tell in the pix but the front is tapered at the top
                        towards the back. You can see the dovetails in the corners.

                        If it comes down to it I can take more pix and some measurements..

                        Here is the link.. excuse the dust on it...
                        http://home.att.net/~rmr3599/seachest.html

                        > <rmr3599@a...> wrote:
                        > > If you do a search for "whalers Chest" at the Popular Woodworking
                        > > website you will come up with the plans that are available to
                        > purchase
                        > > for a sea chest. The chest is approx 3' long and @14" tall and @18
                        > to
                        > > 20" deep.. The plans are complete that they show you how to make
                        > the
                        > > rope handles and weave the turks head knots upon the rope gromets.
                        > The
                        > > chest itself is sloped on the front and has hand chiseled dovetail
                        > > joints in the corners of the chest.. It's a neat project that is
                        > > excellent looking.
                        > >
                        > > The chest in the plans has the name of a ship called the Acushnet
                        > upon
                      • Howard Gibbins
                        Greetings: Thanks for the info on the chests. I doubt if I ll order anything from marlinespike.com as the shipping to Canada from New York would probably be
                        Message 11 of 15 , Feb 11, 2003
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                          Greetings:

                          Thanks for the info on the chests. I doubt if I'll order anything from
                          marlinespike.com as the shipping to Canada from New York would probably
                          be outrageous. I'll definately have a look for the popular woodworking
                          magazine and see what I can find.

                          For those of you who made your own chests what type of wood were you
                          using? I would assume it would be either oak, or maple - something that
                          would stand-up to being shoved around a lot. I also don't see any
                          latching hardware what is normal for this - or were they even locked
                          traditionally?

                          Howard

                          --
                          53 Deg. 33 Min North Latitude
                          113 Deg. 29 Min. West Longitude

                          Website: http://www.telusplanet.net/public/hgibbins
                        • signin3599 <rmr3599@att.net>
                          You can see that my chest was made out of Pine, it was easy to chisel out the dovetails which was a lot easier than I ever thought. I used a chest lock that I
                          Message 12 of 15 , Feb 11, 2003
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                            You can see that my chest was made out of Pine, it was easy to
                            chisel out the dovetails which was a lot easier than I ever thought.
                            I used a chest lock that I purchased from Constantine Wood Supplies.

                            I also put a lid support to hold the lid up. I also purchased from
                            Constantine's some Antique nails, which you can see in the pictures,
                            just thought that was a nice touch..



                            --- In knottyers@yahoogroups.com, Howard Gibbins <hgibbins@t...> wrote:
                            > Greetings:
                            >
                            > Thanks for the info on the chests. I doubt if I'll order anything from
                            > marlinespike.com as the shipping to Canada from New York would probably
                            > be outrageous. I'll definately have a look for the popular woodworking
                            > magazine and see what I can find.
                            >
                            > For those of you who made your own chests what type of wood were you
                            > using? I would assume it would be either oak, or maple - something that
                            > would stand-up to being shoved around a lot. I also don't see any
                            > latching hardware what is normal for this - or were they even locked
                            > traditionally?
                            >
                            > Howard
                            >
                            > --
                            > 53 Deg. 33 Min North Latitude
                            > 113 Deg. 29 Min. West Longitude
                            >
                            > Website: http:/
                            /www.telusplanet.net/public/hgibbins
                          • Howard Gibbins
                            Pine, eh? Shows you how much I know about wood identification - high school wood shop was a long time ago, and I wasn t much better then :) I see the lock now
                            Message 13 of 15 , Feb 11, 2003
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                              Pine, eh? Shows you how much I know about wood identification - high
                              school wood shop was a long time ago, and I wasn't much better then :)

                              I see the lock now that I look closer.

                              Thanks for the info.

                              Howard

                              --
                              53 Deg. 33 Min North Latitude
                              113 Deg. 29 Min. West Longitude

                              Website: http://www.telusplanet.net/public/hgibbins
                            • donsimpson27609
                              The Arts of the Sailor has drawings for a ditty box twenty inches long and also a nice illustration of a full size sea chest. Also see Fine Woodworking s
                              Message 14 of 15 , Feb 12, 2003
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                                "The Arts of the Sailor" has drawings for a ditty box twenty
                                inches long and also a nice illustration of a full size sea chest.
                                Also see Fine Woodworking's "The Toolbox Book" for lots of
                                techniques. Most of these old chests were painted so the choice of
                                wood isn't too important as far as appearance goes. Mahogany is
                                always a nice easy wood to work with and very stable in varying
                                temperature and moisture conditions. Traditional hardware can be
                                ordered from Lee Valley Tools at
                                http://www.leevalley.com/home/main.asp

                                Don


                                > For those of you who made your own chests what type of wood were
                                you
                                > using? I would assume it would be either oak, or maple -
                                something that
                                > would stand-up to being shoved around a lot. I also don't see any
                                > latching hardware what is normal for this - or were they even
                                locked
                                > traditionally?
                                >
                                > Howard
                                >
                                > --
                                > 53 Deg. 33 Min North Latitude
                                > 113 Deg. 29 Min. West Longitude
                                >
                                > Website: http://www.telusplanet.net/public/hgibbins
                              • garyfng
                                All you Sea Chest lovers... I am fortunate enough to have my ABOK signed by both of Mr. Ashley s daughters. And when I told one of them about the missing end
                                Message 15 of 15 , Feb 12, 2003
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                                  All you Sea Chest lovers...
                                  I am fortunate enough to have my ABOK signed by both of Mr. Ashley's
                                  daughters. And when I told one of them about the missing end papers
                                  of the sea chests in the later editions of her father's book she was
                                  surprised.
                                  But I digress. My sea chest is pictured in the photo section - it is
                                  the one with the eagle and stars on the front of it - and it has
                                  served me faithfully. It has "tumblehome", or slanted, front and
                                  rear. The carcase is pine, the top is poplar, and the eagle, stars,
                                  becket cleats and other trim are walnut. Basically I used whatever I
                                  had on hand to build it. It is 22" at the maximum width, 16" at
                                  maximum depth and 12" tall. The carcase corners are not dovetailed -
                                  I didn't know how to cut dovetails when I built it. But dovetails
                                  were traditionally used because of the inherent mechanical strength
                                  of dovetails -and because moisture would cause the glues of the day
                                  to fail - and dovetails would actually become stronger as the wood
                                  absorbed any moisture and therefore not fail because the glue did.
                                  According to what I have been able to learn most American seamen's
                                  chests were of pine. Officers often had nicer sea chests sometimes
                                  made of exotic woods in exotic ports of call. And although my chest
                                  has decoration on the external front most decorations on traditional
                                  sea chests were on the inside of the lid. Mermaids, ships, etc.
                                  I plan to build a new chest, perhaps in time for the NAB get
                                  together in Oct. and retire my current chest. I like the size and
                                  shape of my current chest so the big change will be to build the
                                  carcase with hand cut dovetails.
                                  Fair leads.
                                  Gary



                                  --- In knottyers@yahoogroups.com, Howard Gibbins <hgibbins@t...>
                                  wrote:
                                  > Pine, eh? Shows you how much I know about wood identification -
                                  high
                                  > school wood shop was a long time ago, and I wasn't much better
                                  then :)
                                  >
                                  > I see the lock now that I look closer.
                                  >
                                  > Thanks for the info.
                                  >
                                  > Howard
                                  >
                                  > --
                                  > 53 Deg. 33 Min North Latitude
                                  > 113 Deg. 29 Min. West Longitude
                                  >
                                  > Website: http://www.telusplanet.net/public/hgibbins
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