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Re: Newbie Questions #1 and #2.

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  • mourgainne
    Hello! I ve also found the tube technique excellent. I use the inside cardboard tube from kitchen plastic film or tin foil, cut it lengthwise and then roll
    Message 1 of 11 , Nov 18, 2002
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      Hello!
      I've also found the 'tube technique' excellent. I use the inside
      cardboard tube from kitchen plastic film or tin foil, cut it
      lengthwise and then roll it nrealy as tight as I want the final the
      thickness of the finished TH to be. Toothpicks are useful for
      holding it in place and anchoring the turns.
      For larger THs that I want to work in their final position (ie those
      where you cannot slide the nearly finished TH in place) I have just
      bought some blue-tack (not unlike bubble gum and used for hanging
      posters on walls without too much damage to the surface when
      removed) which I will use for embedding the toothpicks after taping
      the pattern in place.
      Kind regards
      mourgainne

      --- In knottyers@y..., "Alan Van Art" <alanv@a...> wrote:
      > Regarding practicing Turk's Head Knots, I found (as noted in
      Richard
      > Phelan's Video "Knots Made Easy") that a cardboard tube stuffed
      tightly with
      > rolled up newspaper makes a good core to practice on. Your cord
      can then be
      > held in place with T-pins. I got a mailing tube about 3"-4" in
      diameter and
      > 18" or so long and stuffed it tightly with rolled up newspaper.
      Then trimmed
      > the ends of the tube square on a bandsaw. T-pins are easily
      obtained at a
      > fabric/sewing supply store, or even at hobby stores.
      >
      > cya
      > Alan
    • Richard A. Victor
      The book Knots Useful & Ornamental by George Russell Shaw published by Bonanza Books in 1924 and 1933 is the only book that I ve run into that analyzes knots
      Message 2 of 11 , Nov 18, 2002
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        The book "Knots Useful & Ornamental" by George Russell Shaw published by
        Bonanza Books in 1924 and 1933 is the only book that I've run into that
        analyzes knots in terms of their component parts in a manner very similar
        to what you've described below. I think you'd find it
        interesting. Although I believe that it is out of print, I first found a
        copy at the public library and subsequently bought a used copy in near new
        condition through Amazon.com for about $9.00. It is made up of about 193
        pages of illustrations accompanied by hand printed notes. There is no text
        as such. The book includes discussions and diagrams of various Turks' Heads.

        Dick

        James wrote:
        >The second question -- ...I've also noticed (I haven't put enough thought
        >into this, so I can't describe it well) the relationships between knots,
        >how a bowline and a sheet bend are essentially the same knot if you really
        >look at them. I'm not sure if everyone is like this, but to understand a
        >knot, I really need to be able to reduce it to it's component parts -- how
        >a clove hitch is two opposing half hitches, etc etc.
        >
        >Now, the one thing that I have NOT been able to figure out, reduce to its
        >component parts, understand, grok, whatever you want to call it -- is the
        >turk's head knots. I've looked at, I think, every web page dealing with
        >them, and I still just can't get it.
      • Leon Metlay & Nina Klionsky
        I m a newcomer to this group but have been playing with knots for many years. Maybe I m overlooking something really obvious, but I ve got a problem: ... I ve
        Message 3 of 11 , Nov 24, 2002
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          I'm a newcomer to this group but have been playing with knots for
          many years. Maybe I'm overlooking something really obvious, but I've
          got a problem:

          At Sun, 17 Nov 2002 18:42:40 -0000 knotslipstick wrote:
          >The expansion technique to use depends, if I remember
          >correctly, on weather the bight count is even or odd. Starting with
          >a 'finished' TH you expand it by weaving a strand with the original
          >under/over pattern (called the pair), then on the next pass you
          >can 'split the pair' by interweaving the strand between the 'pair'.
          >This interweave locks the pair and completes the weaves under/over
          >sequence. You then even out how the strands are distributed around
          >the circumfrence of the knot. You can expand up the TH as many times
          >as you would like.

          I've been fiddling with this, trying to make it work. As written it
          doesn't work. Each strand should form at least one bight on both
          sides of the knot. The second strand of the pair, as described,
          doesn't form an outside bight as often as it should. There has to be
          some crossing over between the strands of the pair in order to form
          the correct number of bights. Could someone please clarify?

          Leon


          --
          Leon Metlay and Nina Klionsky metlionsky@...
          Making the world safe for dustbunnies since 1977
          "Flame a newbie for spreading a virus hoax and you add to the spam.
          Teach a newbie to research a rumor and you increase the peace."-me &
          Mike check out:
          http://hoaxbusters.ciac.org/ http://www.snopes.com/
          http://www.urbanlegends.com/
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