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26Re: Saving in brother format on floppy disk

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  • mikezcnc
    Nov 29, 2004
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      Great info. Once I get the machine I will be able to tell what can be
      done with it. I am surprised that the knitting machine market is not
      developed more, relative to CNC market, although I am thankful for
      DAK. Your comment that KH-940 requires a high human intervention tell
      me that maybe I don't need the program and cable for a long time
      because if there are 555 Brother designed patterns stored in ROM
      then maybe it is practical to use them rather than getting into
      making my own designs.

      I also know that there is a Garter accessiry that automates teh
      machine. Mike








      --- In kminternals@yahoogroups.com, "John R. Hogerhuis" <jhoger@p...>
      wrote:
      > On Mon, 2004-11-29 at 15:50, mikezcnc wrote:
      > > I agree. Look here:
      > > http://tinyurl.com/6hskf
      > > http://tinyurl.com/7yo9d
      > >
      > > Except for it is for an embroidery machine.
      >
      > Yeah my Mom has an embroidery sewing machine that can take these
      > proprietary oddball flash cards, probably the same kind.
      >
      > The data format for these machines has already been reverse
      engineered,
      > and there is actually a related SourceForge free software project.
      >
      > http://embroidermodder.sourceforge.net/
      >
      > I found this on the web, I include it here only to give a feeling
      for
      > what I want to figure out for the Brother 930 KM (this is actually
      for
      > an embroidery KSM file format):
      >
      > Structure of a KSM (Pfaff professional) design file :
      >
      > (all values given in HEX)
      >
      >
      > Design data starts at 200 Hex = Byte 512 dec.
      >
      > Three bytes per stitch, data is stored unsigned while
      signing of
      > x- and y-
      > coordinates is done by two bits in Byte three
      >
      > typical standard stitches :
      >
      > Hex values : Binary equivalent:

      > Explanation (dec)
      >
      > NNNN 0F 02 80 00001111 00000010 10000000
      y+15 , x+2
      > NNNN 0A 06 C0 00001010 00000110 11000000
      y+10 , x-6
      > NNNN 03 7F A0 00000011 01111111 10100000 y-3 , x+127
      > NNNN 20 13 E0 00100000 00010011 11100000 y-32 , x-19
      >
      > Bytes 1 and 2 of each stitch hold the unsigned stitch
      length,
      > bit 7 of byte
      > three is ALWAYS set, bit 6 tells you y is negative, while
      bit 5
      > negates x.
      >
      > Color changes:
      >
      > NNNN 03 08 99 00000011 00001000 10011001 y+3 , x+8
      >
      color change
      >
      > Bits 0,3,4 of byte 3 set tell you this is a color change
      record.
      >
      >
      >
      >
      > Back to KM's though:
      >
      > >
      > > About DAK like program: it onsists of two parts, one is a design
      > > package, that takes colors, shapes, styles into consideration to
      > > calculate a control file for the machine. The second part of the
      > > program is the data trasfer protocol and file.
      > >
      > > I am interested in downloading the data from a PC to a machine
      and/or
      > > possibly data from the machine to a PC for a modification within
      a PC.
      > >
      > > I understand that it is very difficult to write a program to
      output a
      > > control file for the machine according to a requirement, a
      certain
      > > type of a sweater. But it cannot be that difficukt to send the
      data
      > >
      > > from a PC to the machine and vice versa. What kind of data is a
      > > different matter at this time.
      > > John, do you know how many motors are in a knitter and if they
      are
      > > steppers or servos?
      >
      > Don't know much about the km hardware (yet), and at the moment my
      > interest is confined to the data format. I'm a programmer so I
      probably
      > have my own limit as to how helpful I can be there in any event, but
      > certainly your questions are on-topic for this list, and I hope
      someone
      > following along can help you.
      >
      > Although Brother km's are "machines" they have a strong manual
      > intervention component. If you're looking to seriously automate
      things
      > there is a hard limit to what you can do unless you are adding
      motors
      > and replacing the control panel with your own circuit board
      connected to
      > a PC.
      >
      > Brother km's are hobbyist devices, and aren't really intended to be
      > completely automated.
      >
      > -- John.
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