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Community Cloud Services

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  • John Robb
    Dear K-Loggers, There are many ways to provide community functionality to K-Loggers inside a corporation. No one technique is best, but in combination they
    Message 1 of 1 , Nov 7, 2001
      Dear K-Loggers,

      There are many ways to provide community functionality to K-Loggers inside a corporation. No one technique is best, but in combination they provide a good way to find useful content and bright people. Here is an overview of community info that provides the basis for a corporate knowledge network (not in order of priority):

      1) K-Log referrers (referers for techies). Who linked to my K-Log? Where is my traffic coming from?

      2) Page views. How much traffic is my K-Log getting and when is it getting it?

      3) Top 100 list. Who is has the most interesting K-logs? Who is a trusted resource? (note: Despite the potential problems, this is key to the identification of good resources. Also, it points people to examples of good K-Logs they can emulate.)

      4) Most popular links. Which links are the most popular? What are other people in the company looking at? (note: this should include the time line for who posted this link first and so on until the last post. This allows people to follow a thread of an idea across K-Logs)

      5) Recent Updates. Which K-logs have been recently updated and when? (note: if a favorites feature is deployed you can answer -- which of my favorite K-logs have been recently updated?)

      6) Search. How can I find recently updated K-logs that contain this keyword? What are the most popular search terms?

      Additionally community functionality that may help, but I have not seen deployed yet:

      7) Organizational directory of K-logs. Who in the organization has a K-log? When was it last updated?

      8) K-log communities. Which K-logs routinely link to each other (usually using a static blogrolling list)? (note: this would make a nice affiliation map that could work better and more simply than collaborative filtering).

      9) Key word maps. Which K-logs are most tightly associated with certain keywords? How do they rank based on popularity? (note: this could help locate key domain experts)

      10) Most often cited K-logs by specific K-log. Who are certain K-Loggers pointing to on a regular basis? (note: this may be esoteric but it answers the question: who are smart people I have identified pointing to?)

      11) Project-based K-Log rings. Which K-Logs are affiliated with specific projects? How is a specific project progressing? (note: this is similar to the organization map, but can be set-up to allow ad-hoc groups to be set up)

      There are many more. But these should get you started. A good K-Log cloud server will have support for most of the core functionality and the ability to program additional Knowledge network functionality as needed. Once a good source is found, a subscription to it will cement the relationship.

      Sincerely,

      John Robb
      http://jrobb.userland.com


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