Loading ...
Sorry, an error occurred while loading the content.
 

Re: [K-Logs] Categorizing organizational weblogs

Expand Messages
  • M. Sean Fosmire
    Another would be areas-of-practice weblogs - logs devoted to a particular topic and area of interest for both lawyer and client.
    Message 1 of 6 , Apr 25, 2004
      Another would be areas-of-practice weblogs - logs devoted to a
      particular topic and area of interest for both lawyer and client.

      ====================================
      M. Sean Fosmire msf@...

      Garan Lucow Miller, P.C.
      Marquette, Michigan
      ====================================

      --Original message--

      > Dear K-loggers,

      > There has been significant progress in the application of weblogs
      > to corporate/organizational networks since this group was founded.
      > It's clear that people are starting to understand that weblogs can
      > be used to filter and flow information that benefits organizational
      > productivity.

      > Here is how I would categorizing them:

      > 1) General news weblogs. News from general news sources that are
      > applicable to internal audiences. With or without editorial comment
      > by the author. These may be automated (via search terms -- it is
      > possible to build a RSS news feed from Google News and republish it
      > as a weblog).

      > 2) Organization specific news weblogs. Internal initiatives (HR,
      > Sales, etc.). Press releases. Competitor information. Product
      > updates. etc.

      > 3) Joblogs. Weblogs that detail what an employee/member has
      > accomplished during the day. This is an easy way to start
      > weblogging in an organization. It can be used to keep track of
      > consultants, geographically dispersed employees, work at home
      > employees, etc. If you have people like that in your organization
      > that you manage and your aren't using a weblog to track their
      > progress, you are missing out.

      > 4) Projectlogs. This is a varient on the Joblog but is authored
      > by multiple project team participants. It is a great way to track a
      > project's progress. It allows people that are infrequently attached
      > to a project to keep tabs on progress. It can be used to spool a
      > new team member up to speed quickly. It is also a great archive to
      > project documents/files (with context as to why they are important).

      > 5) Research weblogs. This is a more formal use of weblogs to
      > publish research. It allows the analyst to publish finished
      > work-product and supporting documents/sources. It allows the
      > analyst to interact with the readers in a way that improves the
      > quality of the research. This is a good way to publish original
      > content.

      > There are probably lots more, let me know the types of weblogs
      > you are running that don't fall into these categories.

      > Research Weblogs

      > I have spent lots of time building research weblogs (for a
      > research company I ran) since 1997 (although they weren't called
      > weblogs at that time -- my effort was to chunk content and organize
      > it in channels in a reverse chronology). Most recently, I have
      > begun to publish a research weblog and have found what I think is a
      > good format. The site is focused on the next generation of
      > terrorism (tough topic, but I have some experience in these areas
      > that I think can help):

      > http://globalguerrillas.typepad.com

      > The format is derived from a combination of my personal writing
      > style and that of Forrester Research (I was the senior Internet
      > analyst there). It is a combination of posted research "briefs"
      > which are moderate length analytical content. These briefs are
      > designed for scanning with multiple bullets for major points (most
      > people scan the Web rather than read). Here are some examples:

      > Destabilizing Terrorist Networks:
      > http://globalguerrillas.typepad.com/globalguerrillas/2004/03/destabilizing_t.html

      > Mapping Terrorist Networks:
      > http://globalguerrillas.typepad.com/globalguerrillas/2004/04/mapping_terrori.html

      > The other post is a "journal" entry. This looks like a standard
      > weblog post in that it usually has a few links and contains only a
      > single idea. Here are some examples:

      > Flight delays (power outages at LAX due to birds):
      > http://globalguerrillas.typepad.com/globalguerrillas/2004/04/journal_flight_.html

      > Attacks on Systems? (looks at the recent terrorist attack on Iraqi oil systems):
      > http://globalguerrillas.typepad.com/globalguerrillas/2004/04/journal_is_this.html

      > I will be working on new ways to present research on a weblog. More soon. Hope this helps.

      > Sincerely,

      > John Robb


      > [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]






      > Yahoo! Groups Links
    • Beau Lebens
      // There has been significant progress in the application of // weblogs to corporate/organizational networks since this // group was founded. It s clear that
      Message 2 of 6 , Apr 26, 2004
        // There has been significant progress in the application of
        // weblogs to corporate/organizational networks since this
        // group was founded. It's clear that people are starting to
        // understand that weblogs can be used to filter and flow
        // information that benefits organizational productivity.


        John - I used to work at an ecommerce company, and we used a blog (which
        I got everyone running on after much skepticism) to record discoveries
        about the system we were working on (having inherited an entire system
        from a previous group), what we did each day (time-sheet style) and also
        snippets of code, resources we came across on the net that were useful
        and other bits and pieces. Down the line a little, we developed a
        reporting system internally that ran reports on our database
        periodically and automatically sent them out via email in HTML format,
        and then archived a copy into the filesystem on our intranet server and
        posted to our internal blog in specific category. This became very
        powerful over time because you could easily look in the "Reports" -> "DB
        Status" or whatever other category and you would have a simple,
        chronologically ordered listing of reports available, archived, ready to
        be accessed.

        We were experimenting with other things that we could automate and have
        them update the blog on their own when I left the company, so I don't
        know where things went after that :)

        FYI, we were using the excellent blosxom (http://www.blosxom.com)
        blogging software, which made it really easy to integrate other things
        into it, because you just have to be able to create a text file in a
        directory somewhere (we were doing it on another machine entirely, which
        performed and rsync to get the files across to the intranet server each
        hour).

        Beau

        PS: I'm following your Global Guerrillas blog very closely - it's an
        intensely interesting topic - can't wait to read the book when it's out!
      • Toth Ben
        We re working on a weblog approach to the provision of a current awareness service for primary care health professionals. Should be up and running soon. We re
        Message 3 of 6 , Apr 26, 2004
          We're working on a weblog approach to the provision of a current
          awareness service for primary care health professionals. Should be up
          and running soon. We're using it as a way of extending the reach of a
          quite traditional service (current awareness). We're also hoping that
          librarians throughout the NHS will work together to create a combined
          service - at the moment there are several primary care current awareness
          services, and a singleservice would be more effective and efficient.

          Cheers

          Ben Toth

          ---------------------------------------------------
          Dr Ben Toth
          Head of Knowledge Management
          NHS Information Authority
          Aqueous II
          Birmingham
          B6 5RQ
          07775 993168
          ---------------------------------------------------






          -----Original Message-----
          From: M. Sean Fosmire [mailto:msf@...]
          Sent: 26 April 2004 04:02
          To: John Robb
          Subject: Re: [K-Logs] Categorizing organizational weblogs


          Another would be areas-of-practice weblogs - logs devoted to a
          particular topic and area of interest for both lawyer and client.

          ====================================
          M. Sean Fosmire msf@...

          Garan Lucow Miller, P.C.
          Marquette, Michigan
          ====================================

          --Original message--

          > Dear K-loggers,

          > There has been significant progress in the application of weblogs
          > to corporate/organizational networks since this group was founded.
          > It's clear that people are starting to understand that weblogs can
          > be used to filter and flow information that benefits organizational
          > productivity.

          > Here is how I would categorizing them:

          > 1) General news weblogs. News from general news sources that are
          > applicable to internal audiences. With or without editorial comment
          > by the author. These may be automated (via search terms -- it is
          > possible to build a RSS news feed from Google News and republish it
          > as a weblog).

          > 2) Organization specific news weblogs. Internal initiatives (HR,
          > Sales, etc.). Press releases. Competitor information. Product
          > updates. etc.

          > 3) Joblogs. Weblogs that detail what an employee/member has
          > accomplished during the day. This is an easy way to start
          > weblogging in an organization. It can be used to keep track of
          > consultants, geographically dispersed employees, work at home
          > employees, etc. If you have people like that in your organization
          > that you manage and your aren't using a weblog to track their
          > progress, you are missing out.

          > 4) Projectlogs. This is a varient on the Joblog but is authored
          > by multiple project team participants. It is a great way to track a
          > project's progress. It allows people that are infrequently attached
          > to a project to keep tabs on progress. It can be used to spool a
          > new team member up to speed quickly. It is also a great archive to
          > project documents/files (with context as to why they are important).

          > 5) Research weblogs. This is a more formal use of weblogs to
          > publish research. It allows the analyst to publish finished
          > work-product and supporting documents/sources. It allows the
          > analyst to interact with the readers in a way that improves the
          > quality of the research. This is a good way to publish original
          > content.

          > There are probably lots more, let me know the types of weblogs
          > you are running that don't fall into these categories.

          > Research Weblogs

          > I have spent lots of time building research weblogs (for a
          > research company I ran) since 1997 (although they weren't called
          > weblogs at that time -- my effort was to chunk content and organize
          > it in channels in a reverse chronology). Most recently, I have
          > begun to publish a research weblog and have found what I think is a
          > good format. The site is focused on the next generation of
          > terrorism (tough topic, but I have some experience in these areas
          > that I think can help):

          > http://globalguerrillas.typepad.com

          > The format is derived from a combination of my personal writing
          > style and that of Forrester Research (I was the senior Internet
          > analyst there). It is a combination of posted research "briefs"
          > which are moderate length analytical content. These briefs are
          > designed for scanning with multiple bullets for major points (most
          > people scan the Web rather than read). Here are some examples:

          > Destabilizing Terrorist Networks:
          >
          http://globalguerrillas.typepad.com/globalguerrillas/2004/03/destabilizi
          ng_t.html

          > Mapping Terrorist Networks:
          >
          http://globalguerrillas.typepad.com/globalguerrillas/2004/04/mapping_ter
          rori.html

          > The other post is a "journal" entry. This looks like a standard
          > weblog post in that it usually has a few links and contains only a
          > single idea. Here are some examples:

          > Flight delays (power outages at LAX due to birds):
          >
          http://globalguerrillas.typepad.com/globalguerrillas/2004/04/journal_fli
          ght_.html

          > Attacks on Systems? (looks at the recent terrorist attack on Iraqi oil
          systems):
          >
          http://globalguerrillas.typepad.com/globalguerrillas/2004/04/journal_is_
          this.html

          > I will be working on new ways to present research on a weblog. More
          soon. Hope this helps.

          > Sincerely,

          > John Robb


          > [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]






          > Yahoo! Groups Links











          Yahoo! Groups Links






          This e-mail is confidential and privileged. If you are not the intended recipient please accept our apologies; please do not disclose, copy or distribute information in this e-mail or take any action in reliance on its contents: to do so is strictly prohibited and may be unlawful. Please inform us that this message has gone astray before deleting it. Thank you for your co-operation.
        • Paul Browning
          ... There s also the ePortfolio angle: a reflective record of educational progress maintained by the student and annotated by the tutor. Another example of a
          Message 4 of 6 , Apr 26, 2004
            --On 25 April 2004 23:02 -0400 "M. Sean Fosmire" <msf@...> wrote:

            > Another would be areas-of-practice weblogs - logs devoted to a
            > particular topic and area of interest for both lawyer and client.

            There's also the ePortfolio angle: a reflective record
            of educational progress maintained by the student and
            annotated by the tutor.

            Another example of a blog just for two people, perhaps?

            Paul

            --
            The Library, Tyndall Avenue, Univ. of Bristol, Bristol, BS8 1TJ, UK
            E-mail: paul.browning@... URL: http://www.bris.ac.uk/
          • David Davies
            Perhaps there s an additional perspective from which weblogs could be viewed, that of weblog tools as personal content management systems. When thought about
            Message 5 of 6 , Apr 26, 2004
              Perhaps there's an additional perspective from which weblogs could be
              viewed, that of weblog tools as personal content management systems. When
              thought about in this way the weblog becomes more than just a place to write
              stuff. The tool can link the weblogger and his/her audience to interesting
              data sources in a more personalized way than through generic access points.
              Portalized you might say (would Paul Browning care to comment?). For
              example, virtual learning environments. For me engaging with a VLE is as
              much about managing the data as well as managing the process, particularly
              from the teacher perspective though increasingly so from the student's
              perspective. I have data kept in many different formats in many different
              systems, some of which I use for personal development, research, some for
              teaching, admin, and often the boundaries and unclear. Just as we're now
              familiar with weblog aggregators assembling functional units of other
              people's weblog posts, then so we might think of the more advanced
              weblogging tools as being able to aggregate & assemble and disaggregate &
              reassemble other forms of data. For me the weblogging revolution is just the
              tip of the personal content management revolution iceberg.

              Cheers,

              David.
            Your message has been successfully submitted and would be delivered to recipients shortly.