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Re: [K-Logs] Cross-tool weblog portability

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  • John Stanforth
    I absolutely agree. I ve been assessing the best ways to implement k-logs in the enterprise, and the issues noted here are *exactly* the main issues we ve
    Message 1 of 3 , Apr 30 3:13 PM
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      I absolutely agree. I've been assessing the best ways to implement k-logs
      in the enterprise, and the issues noted here are *exactly* the main issues
      we've identified as needing resolution. The master list of RSS files, in
      particular, would provide a framework for both individual archival feeds on
      a single site and for meta-lists for various k-logs by topic, etc. And the
      approach Phil notes here would let us tie our various data sources into our
      existing ERP and CRM systems-- this so far has been one of the deal-breakers
      as overall policy mandates not storing company information into various
      disparate systems so as to avoid the necessity to search multiple systems
      for important information. Tying them together cleanly would greatly
      advance both the utility and the acceptance of k-logs in the enterprise.




      Phil Wolff wrote:
      > Tiernan Ray says that enterprise blogging won't take off until it
      > becomes painless to migrate weblogs from tool to tool [1]. I agree.
      >
      > One solution:
      >
      > Archival RSS.
      >
      > Convention says you publish an RSS file per home page. Symbolic
      > of "what's new".
      >
      > We need RSS files for every archival page. If you write archives by
      > the day, week, month or year, one for each. If you write archives by
      > category or topic, one for each. Where there's an html page, there
      > should be an RSS file.
      >
      > One other piece: A master list, perhaps in OPML, of the RSS files.
      >
      > This makes structure explicit so content can be discovered, imported,
      > and flowed through new templates. The cost, negligible.
      >
      > Data portability is a huge deal in enterprise apps. The worlds of
      > ERP, CRM, databases, email, and file service all met this threshold
      > many years' ago. Weblog engineers should step up now.
      >
      > Am I correctly defining the problem from a business perspective? Is
      > it worthy of attention? Are there better solutions? Alternative
      > strategies?
      >
      >
      >
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    • vrtprj.com
      ... Agree too, but isn t that already given considering the fact that most weblogs - at least the ones I would use in a business/enterprise context - use
      Message 2 of 3 , May 2, 2003
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        > Tiernan Ray says that enterprise blogging won't take off until it
        > becomes painless to migrate weblogs from tool to tool [1]. I agree.

        Agree too, but isn't that already given considering the fact that most
        weblogs - at least the ones I would use in a business/enterprise context -
        use database backends anyway? Weblog data migration would then fit nicely
        into the normal data migration processes for tool changes.

        PS: Where does "[1]" point to?

        > One solution:
        >
        > Archival RSS.
        [...]
        >
        > Am I correctly defining the problem from a business perspective? Is
        > it worthy of attention? Are there better solutions? Alternative
        > strategies?
        >

        3 scenarios:
        1) One organisation with a standard weblog application: they would probably
        go directly to the database, why bother with RSS here?

        2) One organisation with lots of different weblog applications: depending on
        the number of different DB backends it would make sense to use RSS archives
        instead of writing lots of data migration scripts.

        3) Multiple collaborating organisations: since the DB backend would probably
        be forbidden territory for partners, providing RSS archives for access by
        partners would make sense, even if the particpants would use the same weblog
        application.



        -----------------------------------
        Rainer Volz
        Virtuelle Projekte - www.vrtprj.de
        Virtual Projects - www.vrtprj.com
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