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Science CiteTrack: Science News This Week

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    - - - - - - - - - - - Sponsored by Eppendorf - - - - - - - - - - - Go for unaffected assay results with Eppendorf Tubes and Plates Plates and tubes for storing
    Message 1 of 10 , Jun 9, 2011
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      - - - - - - - - - - - Sponsored by Eppendorf - - - - - - - - - - -

      Go for unaffected assay results with Eppendorf Tubes and Plates

      Plates and tubes for storing and processing samples should be selected
      carefully as they can influence the quality and reproducibility of your
      entire workflow. Eppendorf Tubes®, Deepwell Plates and Microplates are
      produced without additives that have been shown to influence bioassay results.
      No slip agents, no plasticizers or biocides are used at any time of the
      manufacturing process. Made from highest quality virgin raw materials,
      Eppendorf Tubes and Plates offer proven mechanical stability, batch tested
      purity standards and excellent automation compatibility that make them your
      perfect partner for demanding research.

      View references and order your free sample
      www.eppendorf.com/consumables

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      Science Classic
      SCIENCE News Summaries, Volume 332, Issue 6035
      dated June 10 2011, is now available at:
      http://www.sciencemag.org/content/vol332/issue6035/news-summaries.dtl
      A copy of the "SCIENCE News This Week" section has been appended below.


      SCIENCE News This Week
      June 10 2011, 332 (6035)


      NEWS OF THE WEEK



      This Week's Section

      Follow the links below for a roundup of the week's top stories in science, or download a PDF of the entire section.


      Around the World

      In science news around the world this week, Brazil's environment agency approved construction of an immense hydroelectric station in the Amazon rainforest, a spending bill passed by the House of Representatives would drastically downsize science and technology programs at the U.S. Department of Homeland Security, the World Health Organization has concluded that cell phones may be carcinogenic, and a new report warns that international funding needed to maintain progress in fighting HIV/AIDS has been declining.

      Random Sample

      National Academies reports can now be downloaded free of charge. Researchers have attempted to mate a pair of rare corpse flowers. And this week's numbers quantify Arctic lands that will be unreachable by 2050 and points devoted to a math problem later found to be unsolvable.

      Newsmakers

      This week's Newsmakers are Rosalyn Yalow, winner of the 1977 Nobel Prize in physiology or medicine for developing a radioimmunoassay for measuring minute quantities of hormones in blood with radioactive tracers, who died on 30 May at the age of 89; and the winners of the 2011 Gruber Cosmology Prize and the Shaw Prizes, which highlight achievements in astrophysics, immunology, and geometry.

      FINDINGS



      New Superbug Found in Cows and People


      Antiatoms, Ready for Work


      NEWS & ANALYSIS



      Scientists Rush to Study Genome of Lethal E. coli

      Kai Kupferschmidt*
      As Science went to press, scientists have not been able to find the source of the deadliest outbreak of enterohemorrhagic Escherichia coli (EHEC) bacteria on record. Yet they are getting to know the pathogen causing it in unprecedented detail, aided by an armada of scientists around the world who are analyzing available genomic data on the fly and, via tweets, wikis, and blogs, disseminating results online.
      * Kai Kupferschmidt is a writer in Berlin.

      Computer Scientist Goes on Offensive to Defend Climate Scientists

      Eli Kintisch
      To climate scientists like Pennsylvania State University's Michael Mann, who has come under relentless attacks from climate change skeptics, John Mashey is "one of the good guys." The 65-year-old Mashey, who amassed a small fortune designing computer systems for the likes of Bell Labs and Silicon Graphics, is spending his retirement years compiling voluminous critiques of what he calls the "real conspiracy" to produce "climate antiscience." He is trying to turn the tables, using tactics some of Mann's opponents may find uncomfortably familiar.

      Mice Prompt Look at Cholesterol's Role in Female Fertility

      Jennifer Couzin-Frankel
      It's easy to forget that cholesterol isn't simply a villain. The white, waxy substance is famously intertwined with heart disease, but cholesterol lives all over the body, building cell membranes and hormones. A small group of researchers is now wondering whether cholesterol also helps maintain fertility—and whether cholesterol abnormalities impair a woman's ability to get and stay pregnant. There's even speculation that a cholesterol-lowering drug, which is no longer on the market, could treat a subset of women who are battling infertility.

      Stigma of HIV Imperils Hard-Won Strides in Saving Lives

      Jane Qiu*
      Encouraged by last month's news that AIDS mortality has plummeted in China, authorities here are embarking on a new 5-year plan for tackling the epidemic that includes ambitious targets for case detection and access to treatment. But further gains are jeopardized, critics warn, by rampant discrimination against HIV-infected individuals and the entrenched stigma of homosexuality in China.
      * Jane Qiu is a writer in Beijing.

      Planetary Two-Step Reshaped Solar System, Saved Earth?

      Richard A. Kerr
      Planetary scientists ponder a lot of questions about origins. Why didn't Mars grow as large as Earth and Venus? Where did the asteroid belt come from? What are Jupiter and Saturn doing so far from the sun? For that matter, why didn't Jupiter just drive Earth into the sun the way most Jupiter-like exoplanets have driven their rocky, Earth-sized neighbors into their stars? A new study that models the earliest solar system's gravitational fandango has an answer for each of those questions, and more. In the model, the solar system's fate is changed forever when Saturn snags the inrushing Jupiter and together they back off before driving the still-growing Earth into oblivion.

      NEWS FOCUS



      A Bengali Recipe for Disaster

      Richard Stone
      The Great Assam Earthquake of 1897 stands as a stark warning to cities on the floodplains of South Asia, including Bangladesh's densely populated capital, Dhaka. Perched on thick, alluvial sediments 200 kilometers south of the epicenter, Dhaka was badly damaged in 1897. The ground under much of the city liquefied, destabilizing foundations. Thanks to the earthquake's gradual buildup, most people in Dhaka managed to escape before buildings disintegrated, but the city may not be so lucky next time. Scientists are finding that both its social features and its geology, including a hidden fault that seismologists believe is gathering stress beneath the sediments, could make the area more vulnerable than appreciated. Few structures in this city of 13 million are built to resist shaking. Shoddy construction is prevalent across Bangladesh and many other developing nations in seismic danger zones.

      Enceladus Now Looks Wet, So It May Be ALIVE!

      Richard A. Kerr
      Liquid water—and the life it may permit—has been the goal of planetary exploration for decades, with not much of the sloshy stuff to show for the effort. Jupiter's moon Europa has a global ocean, but unfortunately, it's out of reach beneath many kilometers of ice. So the sight in 2005 of ice and water vapor jetting hundreds of kilometers above Saturn's icy little moon Enceladus, like Yellowstone geysers gone ballistic, warmed the hearts of astrobiologists everywhere. But as terrestrial geologists soon pointed out, water plumes needn't mean liquid water. Enceladus might be frozen solid and still be spouting water ice and vapor. With new observations, the "Enceladus: Oasis or Iceball?" debate is now coming down on the side of a wet interior for the moon—and a chance for life.

      South African Cave Slowly Shares Secrets of Human Culture

      Michael Balter
      At Sibudu Cave in South Africa lies a record of prehistoric human occupation that extends back at least 77,000 years and probably much longer. These multilayered, humanmade sediments are crammed with thousands of artifacts left behind by Homo sapiens during our species' formative years, culturally speaking. There are sophisticated stone tools, skillfully made bone implements, deep hearths, and the charred bones of large and small mammals; there are swatches of bedding made of sedges and grass, chunks of red ochre, and sparkling ornamental beads made from the shells of sea snails. This site has become a powerful tool for testing hypotheses about the cognitive prowess of early modern humans. The excavations have pushed back the first signposts for complex cognition, producing evidence for the earliest known bows and arrows as well as the precocious use of snares and traps to catch small animals, both of which require the ability to plan ahead.
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      - - - - - - - - - - - Sponsored by Eppendorf - - - - - - - - - - -

      Go for unaffected assay results with Eppendorf Tubes and Plates

      Plates and tubes for storing and processing samples should be selected
      carefully as they can influence the quality and reproducibility of your
      entire workflow. Eppendorf Tubes®, Deepwell Plates and Microplates are
      produced without additives that have been shown to influence bioassay results.
      No slip agents, no plasticizers or biocides are used at any time of the
      manufacturing process. Made from highest quality virgin raw materials,
      Eppendorf Tubes and Plates offer proven mechanical stability, batch tested
      purity standards and excellent automation compatibility that make them your
      perfect partner for demanding research.

      View references and order your free sample
      www.eppendorf.com/consumables


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