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15Science CiteTrack: Science News This Week

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  • SharifahNR
    Feb 6, 2011
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      Science/AAAS Webinar: Label and Label–free Technologies in Synergy:
      Creating a Powerful Approach to Drug Discovery – Wednesday, March 2, 2011,
      at 12 noon ET (9 a.m. PT, 5 p.m. GMT)


      Label–free technologies have now gained wide acceptance in both academic
      research settings and in drug discovery laboratories. The pairing of
      fast and accurate label–free technologies with traditional systems for
      labeled detection has made highly sensitive medium to high throughput
      cellular and biochemical assays in microplate format routinely possible.
      This advance offers scientists a fuller picture of their system under
      study and speeds the screening of compounds for drug discovery. This
      webinar will explore in depth the pros and cons of combining traditional
      label technologies with label-free assays, a so-called orthogonal approach.
      Ask your questions live during the event!
      Register TODAY: www.sciencemag.org/webinar
      Produced by the Science/AAAS Business Office and sponsored by PerkinElmer.
      Science/AAASScienceNOWScience 
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      >Science | >Science Signaling | >Science Translational Medicine | >Science Express | >Science Classic
      Human Genome Anniversary
      A special month-long series celebrating the 10th anniversary of the sequencing of the human genome explores the impacts of the genomics revolution on science and society.
      SCIENCE News Summaries, Volume 331, Issue 6017
      dated February 4 2011, is now available at:
      http://www.sciencemag.org/content/vol331/issue6017/news-summaries.dtl
      A copy of the "SCIENCE News This Week" section has been appended below.

      SCIENCE News This Week
      February 4 2011, 331 (6017)

      NEWS OF THE WEEK


      This Week's Section

      Follow the links below for a roundup of the week's top stories in science, or download a PDF of the entire section.

      Around the World

      In science news around the world this week, Egypt's political upheavals are threatening its famed antiquities, Intel is investing $100 million in computing and communications research, DOE is requesting big increases in two signature energy-research initiatives, 6000 transgenic dengue-fighting mosquitoes were released in Malaysia, preventive treatment was shown to reduce severe malaria in children up to age 5, CERN will wait another year before it shuts down the Large Hadron Collider for repairs, and 3000-year-old artifacts that were destroyed in a World War II bombing raid have been pieced back together and went on display in Berlin.

      Random Sample

      "Bad Project," a lab-based parody of Lady Gaga's hit single "Bad Romance," has been viewed on YouTube more than 1.5 million times since it was posted on 20 January. Two hundred Cornell undergraduates swabbed their cheeks and submitted DNA samples to the Genographic Project, which tracks the history of human migration through DNA studies. And this week's numbers include funding to vaccinate children, carbon dioxide emissions, and university endowments.

      FINDINGS


      How Giants Conquered Earth

      Memory Booster

      An Army of Ant Genomes

      Hugs Follow a 3-Second Rule

      Kepler Packs in the Exoplanets

      The Write Stuff

      NEWS & ANALYSIS


      Can Obama Strike a Deal With House Republicans?

      Jeffrey Mervis
      Much has been made of the pending titanic battles between the White House and congressional Republicans over the fate of health care reform and how to stimulate the economy while rolling back spending. President Barack Obama made his position clear on both topics in his first State of the Union address to a divided Congress. Science talked with three Republican House members with seats on committees that oversee science about possible areas of agreement. Their answers, while reflecting their deeply conservative views, suggest there may be some room for compromise on how best to foster innovation.

      With Reforms Under Way, International Centers Ask: Where Is the Money?

      Dennis Normile
      Midway through a reform process intended to reinvigorate research efforts and boost financial support, scientists and administrators involved in the Consultative Group on International Agricultural Research say the effort is bearing fruit. Its new central fund named an executive director last week: Jonathan Wadsworth of the U.K. Department for International Development. Leaders of the 15 centers say cooperation is growing, but they are also wondering what has happened to the promised money.

      USDA Decides Against New Regulation of GM Crops

      Erik Stokstad
      After nearly 4 years of a court-imposed ban, U.S. farmers will once again be able to plant genetically modified (GM) alfalfa. The high-stakes decision, announced last week by the U.S. Department of Agriculture (USDA), is notable because the department had considered establishing strict regulations that would have limited the planting of GM alfalfa near organic farms. Those restrictions would have set a precedent for the regulation of other GM crops. In opting against any restrictions, USDA is leaving it up to the farmers to figure out how organic and biotech agriculture can coexist, although the agency has pledged to help with research.

      Obama Shifts Focus From Emissions to 'Clean' Energy

      Eli Kintisch
      Letting market forces help the United States reduce its greenhouse gas emissions by choosing "cleaner" sources of electricity has been a popular notion among some Republicans, who oppose the Democratic alternative of putting a price on U.S. carbon emissions. Now the idea has a new advocate: President Barack Obama. Last week, Obama proposed a "Clean Energy Standard" that would require the country, by 2035, to obtain 80% of its electrical power from a list of sources that includes renewables, nuclear power, "efficient" natural gas, and coal with its CO2 emissions captured and sequestered.

      NIH Report Urges Greater Emphasis on Training for All Graduate Students

      Jeffrey Mervis
      It's a familiar complaint: Academic researchers intent on cranking out another paper and obtaining their next grant sometimes see their students as little more than another pair of hands rather than as scientists in training. Now comes a new report that attempts to redefine the goals of graduate and postdoctoral training and prods biomedical scientists to become better mentors. Similar exhortations have been made before, but the report comes from an organization with significant financial clout: the flagship training institute at the U.S. National Institutes of Health.

      NEWS FOCUS


      Waiting for the Revolution

      Eliot Marshall
      Medical schools and research centers are investing tens of millions of dollars each to join the genomic medicine bandwagon. Yet some say this is a huge leap into uncharted clinical territory. Most doctors have not embraced the genomic revolution, according to leaders of medical professional groups, because they have trouble seeing how it will benefit their patients. DNA testing is growing rapidly in oncology to guide the treatment of some cancers and in screening couples before conception and newborns to find dangerous mutations, and many labs are developing therapies to narrowly target tumor DNA. But aside from these situations, applications are scant; most public health reviews of DNA-based approaches have not found a health benefit. As doctors and scientists look back over the decade since the human genome was published, some are asking tough questions. Is the translation of DNA research into medical practice taking longer than expected? Has the genomic medicine revolution faltered?
      This News story and another on gene patents (p. 530) launch a series of features this month commemorating the 10th anniversary of Science's and Nature's publications of the human genome, which are gathered here.

      Human Genetics in the Clinic, One Click Away

      Eliot Marshall
      The number of genes identified as factors in human disease has exploded in the past decade, but the volume and the tentative nature of the information are a problem for medicine. Finding a way to give medical practitioners the right genetic information, but not too much, at the point of care is one of the biggest challenges in the field, second only to the main one: developing evidence that genomic medicine can make patients healthier (see main text). Computer technology may come to the rescue. At Intermountain Healthcare network in Salt Lake City, geneticists are using digital tools to slip up-to-date education into the daily run of medicine in ways that doctors may find helpful.
      This News story and the one it accompanies, plus another on gene patents (p. 530), launch a series of features this month commemorating the 10th anniversary of Science's and Nature's publications of the human genome, which are gathered here.

      The Human Genome (Patent) Project

      Sam Kean
      Scientists have come to realize that any one gene accounts for only a small risk for most diseases and that many "common" diseases like diabetes are the result of many distinct DNA variations. Many diagnostic companies have therefore shifted focus and offer so-called multiplex tests, which can scan dozens of genes and study the molecular products of each. Patents last up to 2 decades, however, so they cannot evolve as quickly as genetics has. In fact, one-fifth of human genes—especially potential moneymakers associated with diseases—are covered by patents, so a commercial outfit developing a diagnostic test faces quite a "patent thicket." But diagnostics is only the most obvious area in which critics say gene patents and gene science have become misaligned. Disputes over the proper way to patent genes—especially how many patents to grant and how broad to make them—have affected most areas of biotechnology.
      This News story and another on genomic medicine (p. 526) launch a series of features this month commemorating the 10th anniversary of Science's and Nature's publications of the human genome, which are gathered here.
      Full story at http://www.sciencemag.org/cgi/content/full/331/6017/530?sa_campaign=Email/sntw/4-February-2011/10.1126/science.331.6017.530

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      Science/AAAS Webinar: Label and Label–free Technologies in Synergy:
      Creating a Powerful Approach to Drug Discovery – Wednesday, March 2, 2011,
      at 12 noon ET (9 a.m. PT, 5 p.m. GMT)


      Label–free technologies have now gained wide acceptance in both academic
      research settings and in drug discovery laboratories. The pairing of
      fast and accurate label–free technologies with traditional systems for
      labeled detection has made highly sensitive medium to high throughput
      cellular and biochemical assays in microplate format routinely possible.
      This advance offers scientists a fuller picture of their system under
      study and speeds the screening of compounds for drug discovery. This
      webinar will explore in depth the pros and cons of combining traditional
      label technologies with label-free assays, a so-called orthogonal approach.
      Ask your questions live during the event!
      Register TODAY: www.sciencemag.org/webinar
      Produced by the Science/AAAS Business Office and sponsored by PerkinElmer.

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