Loading ...
Sorry, an error occurred while loading the content.
 

RE: [ksurf] Dyneama line - What da call it?

Expand Messages
  • german serrano gomez
    High density polyethilene (Dyneema and Spectra) has a very low friction coefficient which makes it possible for you to retain control of your kite even after
    Message 1 of 4 , Oct 23, 2003
      High density polyethilene (Dyneema and Spectra) has a very low friction coefficient which makes it possible for you to retain control of your kite even after the kite has turned around many times like in flying stunt kites, solo and team (I have flown my indor and outdor kites with 6 to 8 turns in the lines and still be able to control them in my flying routines) .

      One drawback of this wonder material is that the melting point of any form of polyethilene is low. If your lines come across any othe type of lines (flax, cotton, Dacron, Kevlar, Nylon, etc.) yours will snap like cutting through butter. When you surf in places were there are other kite flyers make sure to stay away of anything but Dyneema/Spectra ... remember, knots are weak spots and you don't want them, specially when you are high up in the sky or zoooooming across. The only place where lots of knots are not enough is in your speed reading.

      Good Winds

      GERMAN

      Mark Pronk <mpronk@...> wrote:
      Dyneema is a brand name from DSM (Dutch company, De Staats Mijnen which
      means, the gouvernments mines...).

      Exerpt from their website:

      "Dyneema is a superstrong polyethylene fiber produced using a patented
      gel spinning process. This remarkable fiber is up to 15 times stronger
      than steel and, weight-for-weight, is 40% stronger than competing aramid
      fibers. It has high energy absorption and low elongation. Dyneema floats
      on water, and is extremely resistant to abrasion, moisture, UV rays and
      chemicals. As a result, it has an almost unlimited range of
      applications, providing maximum strength and security for minimum
      weight."

      And:

      "Exceptional strength:

      A Dyneema rope is as strong as a wire rope, with the same diameter but
      only about 10% of the weight per meter. A new Dyneema rope has a low
      elongation to break of approx. 6%, falling to 3.5% in use. As the
      elongation decreases, the breaking strength of the rope increases by
      approx. 10%, as load-sharing between the Dyneema fibers improves. This
      results in much less backlash in the event of failure. Building
      staggered failure into the rope can reduce this even further or
      eliminate it altogether."


      "Excellent fatigue resistance:

      Dyneema, with a specific density of less than one, has a neutral
      buoyancy. Italso outperforms steel and other synthetic rope materials in
      terms of both tension-tension fatigue and bending-bending fatigue.
      Durability - Dyneema's properties are not impaired by sea water and the
      ropes' breaking strength remains constant in wet or dry conditions.
      These ropes have good UV resistance, and are unaffected by oil or
      commonly used chemicals. They also show good abrasion resistance. A
      mantle construction to protect the rope is advisable in some cases."


      "Processing requirements
      Dyneema is compatible with all commonly used ropemaking techniques, and
      has been tested in the following constructions:

      Wire-laid and semi-parallel constructions: These provide the best
      balance between strength and bending-bending fatigue. Both sockets and
      splices can be used for terminations.
      8-strand plaited ropes: These are mainly used for applications such as
      towing and mooring, as this construction is the most resistant to
      mechanical damage. These ropes can be easily spliced.
      12-strand braided ropes: In some applications this construction performs
      even better than the 8-strand plaited rope.
      Braided ropes: These are the first choice for yachting ropes, winch
      lines and other smaller ropes. The ropes can be covered with another
      braid and the terminations can be splices or sockets."

      "Dyneema is easy to process. In order to maintain Dyneema's high
      tenacity and low elongation, whatever the rope construction, the Dyneema
      fiber must be held under constant tension and differences in path length
      should be avoided during processing. The contact points are very
      important: these should be hard, with a surface like a skin of an
      orange. They should preferably be rolling, and should not be worn."

      Search on google for Dyneema (which is the right spelling) and keep
      reading for weeks.. ;-)


      Have fun!


      Mark
      -----------------------------------------------------
      Happy kiting, whatever you fly!
      http://foils.nl
      -----------------------------------------------------




      > -----Oorspronkelijk bericht-----
      > Van: Meyer, Chris (MOZ) [mailto:chris.meyer@...]
      > Verzonden: donderdag 23 oktober 2003 11:55
      > Aan: 'kitesurf@yahoogroups.com'
      > Onderwerp: [ksurf] Dyneama line - What da call it?
      >
      >
      > Question for you, who have the time to re-answer.......as I
      > bet it's been asked before. Anyone know what the Technical
      > name for Dyneama is...because I called a rope manufacturing
      > company and they had no idea what I was speaking about.
      >
      > If I wanted to search Yahoo Groups for my answers, is there
      > an easy way? Search message history.
      >
      > Regards
      > Chris
      >
      >
      > This group is sponsored by KiteHIGH.com Kitesurfing
      >
      http://www.KiteHIGH.com
      ph: 1 866 646 7835 Toll Free USA or
      ph: 1 808 637 KITE (5483)
      Em: support@...

      Your use of Yahoo! Groups is subject to
      http://docs.yahoo.com/info/terms/



      This group is sponsored by KiteHIGH.com Kitesurfing

      http://www.KiteHIGH.com
      ph: 1 866 646 7835 Toll Free USA or
      ph: 1 808 637 KITE (5483)
      Em: support@...

      Your use of Yahoo! Groups is subject to http://docs.yahoo.com/info/terms/




      ---------------------------------
      Do You Yahoo!?
      Todo lo que quieres saber de Estados Unidos, América Latina y el resto del Mundo.
      Visíta Yahoo! Noticias.


      [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
    Your message has been successfully submitted and would be delivered to recipients shortly.