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Re: RES: RES: RES: RES: [ksurf] Kitesurfing maturing?durable board

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  • georgeiw@aol.com
    3/8 okume or maranti 1088 marine plywood is incredibly durable, uniform flex, no voids and can be shaped at the edge. You can cut across it and fold the ends
    Message 1 of 15 , Jul 28, 2003
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      3/8" okume or maranti 1088 marine plywood is incredibly durable, uniform
      flex, no voids and can be shaped at the edge. You can cut across it and fold the
      ends to make a tip. If you glue 1/4" and 1/8" you can glue in some rocker.
      it does not weigh too much.
      The 3/8 is 7 plys, the 1/4 is 5 ply and the 1/8 is 3 ply. look at
      clcboats.com Chesapeake light craft if you can not get it locally. it is worth it.
      George


      [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
    • theflyingtinman
      ... What do you mean by ... You can cut across it and fold the ends to make a tip. ? I m just about to cut my first ply board form a sheet of 3/8 marine ply
      Message 2 of 15 , Jul 29, 2003
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        --- In kitesurf@yahoogroups.com, georgeiw@a... wrote:
        > 3/8" okume or maranti 1088 marine plywood is incredibly durable,
        > uniform flex, no voids and can be shaped at the edge. You can
        > cut across it and fold the ends to make a tip. ...

        What do you mean by ...
        "You can cut across it and fold the ends to make a tip." ?

        I'm just about to cut my first ply board form a sheet of 3/8
        marine ply (I think it's Douglas Fir though, not maranti or
        okume .. is that ok?

        Steve T.
      • georgeiw@aol.com
        Steve, fir is ok but not as good because of the voids and the way that it wants to check and crack. You can not get paint to stay. one or two coats of epoxy
        Message 3 of 15 , Jul 29, 2003
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          Steve,
          fir is ok but not as good because of the voids and the way that it wants to
          check and crack. You can not get paint to stay. one or two coats of epoxy
          should work. I color the epoxy white or black and then I do not have to paint
          it.

          The tip idea works like this. I usually fold the last 4 inches up on each
          end so that it is easier to go over waves instead of getting caught by them.

          If the board is 3/8 thick I draw a line across the board 4 inches back from
          the tip. I then set the saw blade for a 1/4" deep cut with a battery dewalt
          circular saw. These have narrow blades but this does not mater that much. I
          clamp the board down and then wedge up the tip so that the end is about 1 1/4"
          higher than the board at the cut. This essentially closes up the saw cut.
          Fill the cut with epoxy. put a 6" wide strip of 4 oz fabric and epoxy across the
          cut and maybe on the bottom and you are done.
          George.

          I will try to upload a photo of this.


          [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
        • theflyingtinman
          ... Thanks George, I understand now; you are folding a flip-tip across each end. I though you were making some fancy folded tips like on the North Dragon. I
          Message 4 of 15 , Jul 29, 2003
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            --- In kitesurf@yahoogroups.com, georgeiw@a... wrote:
            > Steve,
            > ...Fill the cut with epoxy. put a 6" wide strip of 4 oz
            > fabric and epoxy across the cut and maybe on the bottom
            > and you are done.
            > George.
            >
            > I will try to upload a photo of this.
            >

            Thanks George,

            I understand now; you are folding a 'flip-tip' across each
            end. I though you were making some fancy folded tips like
            on the North Dragon.

            I was planning to use this 'flip tip' method I found in the
            Yahoo boardbuilding files ...

            http://groups.yahoo.com/group/boardbuilding/files/Daves%20Ply%20boards/

            but your method may be stronger.

            I cut (at least the outline) tonight.

            Steve T.
          • georgeiw@aol.com
            In a message dated 7/29/2003 10:29:55 PM Eastern Daylight Time, ... That method will also work fine and be plenty strong. having the little lip breaks your
            Message 5 of 15 , Jul 30, 2003
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              In a message dated 7/29/2003 10:29:55 PM Eastern Daylight Time,
              theflyingtinman@... writes:

              > http://groups.yahoo.com/group/boardbuilding/files/Daves%20Ply%20boards/

              That method will also work fine and be plenty strong.
              having the little lip breaks your trailing wave and reduces drag supposedly.
              My method is a little faster but not enough to get excited about.
              Good luck
              George


              [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
            • fly
              Steve T, Interested in how your project goes-feel free to post updates as you progress. What dimensions did you cut out? Fly ... From: theflyingtinman To:
              Message 6 of 15 , Jul 31, 2003
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                Steve T,

                Interested in how your project goes-feel free to post updates as you progress.

                What dimensions did you cut out?

                Fly
                ----- Original Message -----
                From: theflyingtinman
                To: kitesurf@yahoogroups.com
                Sent: Wednesday, July 30, 2003 12:27 PM
                Subject: Re: RES: RES: RES: RES: [ksurf] Kitesurfing maturing?durable board


                --- In kitesurf@yahoogroups.com, georgeiw@a... wrote:
                > Steve,
                > ...Fill the cut with epoxy. put a 6" wide strip of 4 oz
                > fabric and epoxy across the cut and maybe on the bottom
                > and you are done.
                > George.
                >
                > I will try to upload a photo of this.
                >

                Thanks George,

                I understand now; you are folding a 'flip-tip' across each
                end. I though you were making some fancy folded tips like
                on the North Dragon.

                I was planning to use this 'flip tip' method I found in the
                Yahoo boardbuilding files ...

                http://groups.yahoo.com/group/boardbuilding/files/Daves%20Ply%20boards/

                but your method may be stronger.

                I cut (at least the outline) tonight.

                Steve T.



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                [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
              • theflyingtinman
                ... Length: 147cm. Width 41cm; I decided to start very wide (I m about 210 lb) and trim down as necessary after riding it. Slight curve in the edges but not
                Message 7 of 15 , Aug 4, 2003
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                  --- In kitesurf@yahoogroups.com, "fly" <loco4olas@h...> wrote:
                  > Steve T,
                  >
                  > Interested in how your project goes-feel free to post updates as you progress.
                  >
                  > What dimensions did you cut out?

                  Length: 147cm. Width 41cm; I decided to start very wide (I'm about 210 lb)
                  and trim down as necessary after riding it.

                  Slight curve in the edges but not much. Rounded corners and straight
                  ends.
                  No rocker, but I steamed 'flip-tips' of about 1.25" onto each end. ( I
                  may need a new steam iron if I ever want to iron clothes again :-/ )

                  The hardware I ordered (stainlass steel T nuts, for the straps, etc) arrived
                  this weekend while I was away, so I'll be finishing it off this week.
                  Now I have to decide whether or not to bother with fins - any advice?
                  And what about sealing? - a coat of varnish?

                  Steve T.
                • Stefano Rosso
                  Length: 147cm. Width 41cm; I decided to start very wide (I m about 210 lb) and trim down as necessary after riding it. == my favorite size for a plyboard is
                  Message 8 of 15 , Aug 4, 2003
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                    Length: 147cm. Width 41cm; I decided to start very wide (I'm about 210
                    lb)
                    and trim down as necessary after riding it.

                    == my favorite size for a plyboard is 140 by 45 so that's not wide ! (I
                    weight 155lbs)

                    Slight curve in the edges but not much. Rounded corners and straight
                    ends.

                    == I have basically a rectangle shape. Round the ends for safety !

                    No rocker, but I steamed 'flip-tips' of about 1.25" onto each end. ( I
                    may need a new steam iron if I ever want to iron clothes again :-/ )

                    === no rocker in mine.. No flip tips... Rarely does it cause a problem
                    (but you need more weight on the back leg.

                    The hardware I ordered (stainlass steel T nuts, for the straps, etc)
                    arrived
                    this weekend while I was away, so I'll be finishing it off this week.
                    Now I have to decide whether or not to bother with fins - any advice?
                    And what about sealing? - a coat of varnish?

                    == I don't seal nothing, and I don't use fins... And I just used some
                    wood screws straight into the wood. Anything else is too much work !

                    No fins are good for riding in 2-5 cm of water !
                  • hungvuatnetcomdotca
                    ... Same here. Basically it is a snowboard shape without the side cut (amphibious board shape) ... A small amount of flip tips (10 mm is OK) helps if your
                    Message 9 of 15 , Aug 4, 2003
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                      > Slight curve in the edges but not much. Rounded corners and straight
                      > ends.
                      >
                      > == I have basically a rectangle shape. Round the ends for safety !

                      Same here. Basically it is a snowboard shape without the side cut
                      (amphibious board shape)

                      > No rocker, but I steamed 'flip-tips' of about 1.25" onto each end. ( I
                      > may need a new steam iron if I ever want to iron clothes again :-/ )
                      >
                      > === no rocker in mine.. No flip tips... Rarely does it cause a problem
                      > (but you need more weight on the back leg.

                      A small amount of flip tips (10 mm is OK) helps if your board
                      sunmarine a lot (due to the small size and unconstant wind).

                      > Now I have to decide whether or not to bother with fins - any advice?
                      > And what about sealing? - a coat of varnish?
                      >
                      > == I don't seal nothing, and I don't use fins... And I just used some
                      > wood screws straight into the wood. Anything else is too much work !
                      >
                      > No fins are good for riding in 2-5 cm of water !

                      No fin of course. Fins are too much work for so little impact
                      (negative sometimes). Varnish would work fine. Wood screw would work
                      fine but not as strong as some bolt system similar to a wakeboard
                      (useful when you want to experiment with different straps).

                      Hung.
                    • theflyingtinman
                      ... Thanks - so, no fins and a coat of varnish it is. To mount the straps I already bought a bunch of stainless steel T-nuts, screws and washers online from
                      Message 10 of 15 , Aug 5, 2003
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                        --- In kitesurf@yahoogroups.com, "hungvuatnetcomdotca" <hungvu@n...> wrote:

                        > ....No fin of course. Fins are too much work for so little impact
                        > (negative sometimes). Varnish would work fine. Wood screw would work
                        > fine but not as strong as some bolt system similar to a wakeboard
                        > (useful when you want to experiment with different straps).

                        Thanks - so, no fins and a coat of varnish it is. To mount the straps I
                        already bought a bunch of stainless steel T-nuts, screws and washers
                        online from McFeely's ( www.mcfeelys.com ) Good, quick service.
                        Stainless T-nuts are hard to find locally - none of the hardware stores
                        around here carry them.
                        What do the DIY-ers use for good, low-cost pads and straps? I could
                        put my spare sandal bindings on it but one of my motivations for making
                        these ply boards is so I don't need to worry too much about loosing
                        them when I start to ride leashless, so I'm trying to make them cheap
                        and 'disposable'.

                        Steve T.
                      • georgeiw@aol.com
                        for pads i cut them out of this foam rubber play room flooring from Home Depot. it is in the carpet section and it comes in a pack of 4 interlocking pieces.
                        Message 11 of 15 , Aug 5, 2003
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                          for pads i cut them out of this foam rubber play room flooring from Home
                          Depot. it is in the carpet section and it comes in a pack of 4 interlocking
                          pieces. They are either grey or in a color pack of yellow, green, red and blue.
                          Each piece can make about 4 pads and they can be sanded to a shape as well. I
                          use a long box cutter blade 3/8" x 3" and you can cut through easily in 2
                          passes. You can cut straight up and down or on a bevel.

                          Around here we have used tow straps and seat buckle straps for the strap. I
                          also buy the dakine, nsi and epic gear stuff. The wind surfer ones cost about
                          16 bucks each which is not too bad.

                          For the bolts my favorite are the barrel bolts from west marine. The barrel
                          bolt is the nut but it had a screw head on the end and an internal threaded
                          tube about 1/2 long. I use the 1/4 20s. You can simply drill a hole in the
                          plywood and keep using them from board to board. I have also used brass threaded
                          inserts from Rockler. you drill a 3/8" hole and screw in the piece which has
                          a machine thread on the inside.

                          The barrel bolts are very easy to use but expensive. about $5.00 each.
                          Good luck
                          George


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                        • hungvuatnetcomdotca
                          ... Steve, There are some types of bolt system that does not go through the bottom so that the bottom is completely flat (and look very nice too) with no holes
                          Message 12 of 15 , Aug 5, 2003
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                            --- In kitesurf@yahoogroups.com, "theflyingtinman"
                            <theflyingtinman@y...> wrote:
                            > Thanks - so, no fins and a coat of varnish it is. To mount the straps I
                            > already bought a bunch of stainless steel T-nuts, screws and washers
                            > online from McFeely's ( www.mcfeelys.com ) Good, quick service.
                            > Stainless T-nuts are hard to find locally - none of the hardware stores
                            > around here carry them.
                            > What do the DIY-ers use for good, low-cost pads and straps? I could
                            > put my spare sandal bindings on it but one of my motivations for making
                            > these ply boards is so I don't need to worry too much about loosing
                            > them when I start to ride leashless, so I'm trying to make them cheap
                            > and 'disposable'.

                            Steve,

                            There are some types of bolt system that does not go through the
                            bottom so that the bottom is completely flat (and look very nice too)
                            with no holes in it. If you use the system that create holes on the
                            bottom of the board, make sure you plug it with some epoxy. You can
                            ask the guys at your local "Home Depot" store for all these various
                            options.

                            If you use water shoe (like I do as it could be very cold around here)
                            then you just need to bolt some straps (a pair of windsurfing straps
                            work just fine and cost around $15 US - A more kite specific pair of
                            Dakine strap is more expensive around $30 to $40 US is better for more
                            support). Don't use wakeboard binding system (even just sandal
                            binding) as they are both expensive and add tons of weight to the board.

                            Hung.
                          • hungvuatnetcomdotca
                            ... The barrel ... threaded ... hole in the ... brass threaded ... which has ... Sounds like the same bolt system I used; however my cost around $.50 each from
                            Message 13 of 15 , Aug 5, 2003
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                              --- In kitesurf@yahoogroups.com, georgeiw@a... wrote:
                              > For the bolts my favorite are the barrel bolts from west marine.
                              The barrel
                              > bolt is the nut but it had a screw head on the end and an internal
                              threaded
                              > tube about 1/2 long. I use the 1/4 20s. You can simply drill a
                              hole in the
                              > plywood and keep using them from board to board. I have also used
                              brass threaded
                              > inserts from Rockler. you drill a 3/8" hole and screw in the piece
                              which has
                              > a machine thread on the inside.
                              >
                              > The barrel bolts are very easy to use but expensive. about $5.00 each.

                              Sounds like the same bolt system I used; however my cost around $.50
                              each from Home Depot ;-)

                              Hung.
                            • Greg Walsh
                              I used Cabrinha binding plates with adjustable straps. They were only slightly more expensive than buying separate wide-style straps and stick-on pads. The
                              Message 14 of 15 , Aug 5, 2003
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                                I used Cabrinha binding plates with adjustable straps. They were only
                                slightly more expensive than buying separate wide-style straps and
                                stick-on pads. The aluminium plates make the board a bit stiffer
                                under your feet and you can easily swap them between boards.

                                I drilled holes straight through the board and put 1/4" stainless
                                bolts up through the bottom. I used cup-washers to remove any chance
                                of the bolts pulling through. If you put the washers on then tighten
                                them super tight it flattens the washers a bit and cuts out the
                                bottom layer of veneer. When you varnish the board it pools around
                                the edge of the washers and you get a nice neat end.

                                I didn't bother with fins because even cheap ones were really
                                expensive. It works great without fins. I had one of my best ever
                                sessions last weekend. I enjoyed the ply board so much I am selling
                                my epoxy-carbon production TT. The ply is the funnest board I have
                                used. :o)))

                                Regards

                                Greg
                              • theflyingtinman
                                ... Sound good, I ll look in at Home Depot on my way home tonight :-) ... I have lots of very wide webbing for straps. ... I bought these stainless steel
                                Message 15 of 15 , Aug 5, 2003
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                                  --- In kitesurf@yahoogroups.com, georgeiw@a... wrote:
                                  > for pads i cut them out of this foam rubber play room flooring
                                  > from Home Depot.

                                  Sound good, I'll look in at Home Depot on my way home tonight :-)

                                  > Around here we have used tow straps and seat buckle
                                  > straps for the strap.

                                  I have lots of very wide webbing for straps.

                                  > For the bolts my favorite are the barrel bolts from west
                                  > marine. The barrel bolt is the nut but it had a screw
                                  > head on the end and an internal threaded tube about 1/2
                                  > long. I use the 1/4 20s...
                                  > ...The barrel bolts are very easy to use but expensive.
                                  > about $5.00

                                  I bought these stainless steel T-nuts (also 1/4 x 20)...

                                  http://tinyurl.com/j4ma

                                  $15.50 for 4 boxes of ten.
                                  Sounds similar to your barrel-bolts but a lot cheaper
                                  and specifically designed for mounting to plywood. If you
                                  slightly contersink with a 3/4 flat wood-bit you get a
                                  comletely flush mounting.

                                  Steve T.
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