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Ozone Frenzy - Water Review

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  • fernmanus <fernmanus@yahoo.com>
    I have been using my Ozone Frenzy on the snow with great results. It is by far the best snow kite I have used so far. I had the opportunity to try my 9.5 M
    Message 1 of 5 , Feb 24, 2003
      I have been using my Ozone Frenzy on the snow with great results.
      It is by far the best snow kite I have used so far.

      I had the opportunity to try my 9.5 M Ozone Frenzy on the water
      while I was vacationing at South Padre Island, TX. The kite handled
      perfectly. The wind was very gusty and the kite never luffed or
      stalled. Jumps were big and lofty. Handled like an LEI, but only
      took a few minutes to setup.

      Three big tips if you decide to take this kite out on the water.
      1. Don't drop it in the water. Open cell kites are not built for
      relaunching.
      2. Don't launch the kite downwind. Launch at the edge of the
      window or you are going to do a big drag across the beach when you
      launch your kite right into the power zone.
      3. You will need assistance to land the kite if you are powered
      up. I am thinking of lengthening the leaders and installing a grab
      handle on one of the back lines to deflate the kite. If you don't
      have someone around, you could probably safely dump the kite in the
      water at the edge of the window. Of course, you are left with a
      sopping wet kite. There is too much pull left in the kite if you
      deploy the safety leash alone when you are really powered up.

      Kenny
    • Greg Walsh <Greg.Walsh@bigpond.com>
      ... wrote: snip ... I fly my Boom kites to the edge of the window then stall them down using the brake leaders. This avoids the big plummet
      Message 2 of 5 , Feb 25, 2003
        --- In kitesurf@yahoogroups.com, "fernmanus <fernmanus@y...>"
        <fernmanus@y...> wrote:

        snip

        > 3. You will need assistance to land the kite if you are powered
        > up. I am thinking of lengthening the leaders and installing a grab
        > handle on one of the back lines to deflate the kite. If you don't
        > have someone around, you could probably safely dump the kite in the
        > water at the edge of the window. Of course, you are left with a
        > sopping wet kite. There is too much pull left in the kite if you
        > deploy the safety leash alone when you are really powered up.
        >
        > Kenny

        I fly my Boom kites to the edge of the window then stall them down
        using the brake leaders. This avoids the big plummet from the top of
        the window down through the power zone and is far more gentle on the
        kite. A couple of steps upwind and a little brake leader manipulation
        stops any tendency for the kite to roll over.

        I then drop the bar and pull in a single brake line to completely
        depower the kite. Be a little careful at this point. The kite can
        flop about if the wind is super strong. Manipulation of the tension
        on the brake line will calm the kite down.

        This works well on all of my foils. A friend tried it on a Warrior
        and got a tangled kite. I think he was a little hesitant wdith the
        brake line but I'm not sure.

        Regards

        Greg
      • Petri Karjalainen <petri.karjalainen@pp.
        Greg, A very good explanation, I too started recently flying Boom Vectors, and therefore would be interested in to know how exactly how you go about the brake
        Message 3 of 5 , Feb 26, 2003
          Greg,

          A very good explanation, I too started recently flying Boom Vectors,
          and therefore would be interested in to know how exactly how you go
          about the brake line manipulation and stepping upwind... could you
          eloborate.

          Rgds,
          Petri
          >
          > I fly my Boom kites to the edge of the window then stall them down
          > using the brake leaders. This avoids the big plummet from the top
          of
          > the window down through the power zone and is far more gentle on
          the
          > kite. A couple of steps upwind and a little brake leader
          manipulation
          > stops any tendency for the kite to roll over.
          >
          > I then drop the bar and pull in a single brake line to completely
          > depower the kite. Be a little careful at this point. The kite can
          > flop about if the wind is super strong. Manipulation of the tension
          > on the brake line will calm the kite down.
          >
          > This works well on all of my foils. A friend tried it on a Warrior
          > and got a tangled kite. I think he was a little hesitant wdith the
          > brake line but I'm not sure.
          >
          > Regards
          >
          > Greg
        • Greg Walsh <Greg.Walsh@bigpond.com>
          ... Vectors, ... The best way to land any kite is to get a helper to catch it. This is the safest and easiest method. It s alos mor sociable and it gives the
          Message 4 of 5 , Feb 28, 2003
            --- In kitesurf@yahoogroups.com, "Petri Karjalainen
            <petri.karjalainen@p...>" <petri.karjalainen@p...> wrote:
            > Greg,
            >
            > A very good explanation, I too started recently flying Boom
            Vectors,
            > and therefore would be interested in to know how exactly how you go
            > about the brake line manipulation and stepping upwind... could you
            > eloborate.

            The best way to land any kite is to get a helper to catch it. This is
            the safest and easiest method. It's alos mor sociable and it gives
            the LEI guys a chance to look at your kite and you can tell them how
            it does relaunch etc etc.

            Practice in very light winds to start with. This is not something you
            want to try the first time in super powered up conditions.

            I stay hooked in and fly the kite to the edge of the window and hover
            2-3 metres above the ground. You must have a quick release loop and
            be a confident and experienced rider if you intend to stay hooked in.

            I then reach forward and grab the leaders about 30-50cm up and pull
            in to stall the kite. A couple of knots in the leaders helps. It can
            get a bit hairy if your hands slip. More brake is not a problem. Too
            little brake can be a big problem!

            As the kite drops backwards I take a couple of steps upwind.

            When the kite settles to the ground the upwind tip can start to fold
            in a little. I pull the upwind brake line a little more to stabilise
            the tip.

            I then grab both brake lines in one hand and get comfortable and
            unhook.

            I proceed to let out the front lines and lay the kite down on its
            back. I am right handed so I usually grab the that brake leader at
            the top of the leader and drop the bar. This is usually the upwind
            leader. It doesn't seem to make much difference which leader you grab.

            Once you have hold of the leader wait a few seconds for the kite to
            settle. In extremely strong conditions you want to have a vey good
            grip on the brake leader. You may also want to wrap the brake line
            around the bar to give you some extra grip.

            In the lower end of my kite's range the kite will just sit down and
            I'll walk along the brake line and grab the kite.

            In stronger conditions the kite will flop around a bit then settle.

            In very strong conditions the kite will flop around a lot then
            settle. In these conditions you may want to consider landing the kite
            on the water if you think having a flopping kite on the beach is
            going to cause a problem. I have only had one situation where I have
            really had to hold on and wait for it to settle. I was riding way
            overpowered. I landed and swapped my 11.5 for the 7.5 which was just
            right.

            To reduce the amount of flopping about I walk towards the kite
            holding the brake line. This reduces the tension and the kite
            settles. Tension on the kite line means it can generate power.

            Regards

            Greg
          • Greg Walsh <Greg.Walsh@bigpond.com>
            It s worth pointing out that using the single brake line to retrieve your kite can put a lot of load on the brake attachment points in very strong conditions.
            Message 5 of 5 , Mar 2, 2003
              It's worth pointing out that using the single brake line to retrieve
              your kite can put a lot of load on the brake attachment points in
              very strong conditions. I have managed to pull a brake tab off of my
              Vectors on a couple of occasions. They are easy to sew back on by
              hand. On one kite I replaced the tabs and put reinforcing tape inside
              the kite and it has been bullet proof since.

              Regards

              Greg
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