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Re: Stupid Stupid Mistake

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  • vide72au
    I think the moral of the story is not to get too close to anything down wind of you, unless you are super confident in the conditions of your ability, prepared
    Message 1 of 9 , Dec 1, 2002
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      I think the moral of the story is not to get too close to anything down wind of
      you, unless you are super confident in the conditions of your ability, prepared
      to take a risk and suffer the consequences. As a general rule, you need to
      make the call and ditch your kite when you are 100+ feet from an obstacle
      otherwise you'll be in trouble. I constanly see people underpowered or
      overpowered right up on the edge of a road where I kite. Once you are that
      close you have no options. Ditch the kite well before once you have realised
      that you don't have the control or power that you need. It's a horrible and
      embarrising situation to be in when you are up against a wall with your kite
      having no where to go except over it.

      --- In kitesurf@y..., "richrdwest" <richrdwest@y...> wrote:
      > Today the wind was about the best it has been for a good while near
      > my house in South Orange County California, and I was able to go out
      > on my kite for the first time in about a month. It was side shore
      > and just good enough to plain pretty well. Wow, I felt great! After
      > about 1.5 hours I had blown downwind a bit to a pier near a good
      > surf spot.
      >
      > That's when I got a great idea; I'll round the pier and "surf" the
      > spot. Well that's when my good sense started to run out. As I neared
      > the end of the pier, the wind started to lull a bit and I noticed
      > that I had drifted pretty close to the pier. Which, by the way, had
      > multiple people fishing, watching the ocean, etc. Instead of
      > immediately turning the kite and heading back in to give myself more
      > room, I tried to dive the kite again and to gain speed and clear the
      > pier. The only problem was I was now too close. The leading edge
      > line (it was a quad line kite) started to touch the pier and drag
      > along the rail. As it did, it caught a 6-year-old girl by the neck.
      > Thank God she immediately ducked down and the line continued on to
      > hit two more people (at least they were adults). At this point I was
      > dragged under the pier and pulled up out of the water where I was
      > slammed onto one of the pilings. Since I was wearing a safety lease,
      > the kite depowered on the pier (at least I was smart enough to do
      > that).
      >
      > Deep breath.
      >
      > I then immediately swam to the side and asked if anybody was hurt.
      > Thank God nobody was, in spite of my stupidity. Needless to say, as
      > I did the swim of shame back to the beach, I was kicking myself. The
      > lifeguards and people on the pier were much too nice about what I
      > had done (they probably didn't realize the danger I had placed them
      > in).
      >
      > In the end, the girl was shaken up, and unfortunately left with her
      > parents (uninjured I was told) before I could offer my apologies.
      >
      > The moral of the story? Don't EVER kite too close to people, piers,
      > etc. I stupidly didn't realize that the wind would change as I got
      > closer to the pier. Please don't make the same mistake I did. One of
      > my lines ended up being broken, and that was it. It could have been
      > much worse. I know I learned my lesson.
      >
      > Richard
    • Ro
      If it helps I also have to confess myself on similar sin. I was solo-launching my kite with very strong and gusty winds at Tarifa. Far (but not far enough)
      Message 2 of 9 , Dec 1, 2002
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        If it helps I also have to confess myself on similar sin.

        I was solo-launching my kite with very strong and gusty winds at
        Tarifa. Far (but not far enough) from bystanders (I would say around
        30m to spare besides line length). With the rush of getting out the
        semi-crowded place I just did not double-check the lineknots which
        were tied backside-front.
        The kite whirled violently and took and old lady plus somebody which
        I could not see due to all the sand in my face.
        After recovering control with the kite crashed on the sand the
        aftermath was just some bruises on two people besides me. I really
        felt shamed and also felt that any apologies from me were just way
        ridiculous for all the mayhem and danger I put all the people in.
        Ther is absolutely no justification for doing what I did.
        I have been kitesurfing since 1998 and never had a single close
        encounter until this day.
        Over confidence dramatically erodes security.
        Since then I make sure to double check knots, try not to solo launch
        when it is not necessary and give twice as much security space as
        before.


        Good winds

        Rod


        --- In kitesurf@y..., "vide72au" <vide72au@y...> wrote:
        > I think the moral of the story is not to get too close to anything
        down wind of
        > you, unless you are super confident in the conditions of your
        ability, prepared
        > to take a risk and suffer the consequences. As a general rule, you
        need to
        > make the call and ditch your kite when you are 100+ feet from an
        obstacle
        > otherwise you'll be in trouble. I constanly see people underpowered
        or
        > overpowered right up on the edge of a road where I kite. Once you
        are that
        > close you have no options. Ditch the kite well before once you have
        realised
        > that you don't have the control or power that you need. It's a
        horrible and
        > embarrising situation to be in when you are up against a wall with
        your kite
        > having no where to go except over it.
        >
        > --- In kitesurf@y..., "richrdwest" <richrdwest@y...> wrote:
        > > Today the wind was about the best it has been for a good while
        near
        > > my house in South Orange County California, and I was able to go
        out
        > > on my kite for the first time in about a month. It was side shore
        > > and just good enough to plain pretty well. Wow, I felt great!
        After
        > > about 1.5 hours I had blown downwind a bit to a pier near a good
        > > surf spot.
        > >
        > > That's when I got a great idea; I'll round the pier and "surf"
        the
        > > spot. Well that's when my good sense started to run out. As I
        neared
        > > the end of the pier, the wind started to lull a bit and I noticed
        > > that I had drifted pretty close to the pier. Which, by the way,
        had
        > > multiple people fishing, watching the ocean, etc. Instead of
        > > immediately turning the kite and heading back in to give myself
        more
        > > room, I tried to dive the kite again and to gain speed and clear
        the
        > > pier. The only problem was I was now too close. The leading edge
        > > line (it was a quad line kite) started to touch the pier and drag
        > > along the rail. As it did, it caught a 6-year-old girl by the
        neck.
        > > Thank God she immediately ducked down and the line continued on
        to
        > > hit two more people (at least they were adults). At this point I
        was
        > > dragged under the pier and pulled up out of the water where I was
        > > slammed onto one of the pilings. Since I was wearing a safety
        lease,
        > > the kite depowered on the pier (at least I was smart enough to do
        > > that).
        > >
        > > Deep breath.
        > >
        > > I then immediately swam to the side and asked if anybody was
        hurt.
        > > Thank God nobody was, in spite of my stupidity. Needless to say,
        as
        > > I did the swim of shame back to the beach, I was kicking myself.
        The
        > > lifeguards and people on the pier were much too nice about what I
        > > had done (they probably didn't realize the danger I had placed
        them
        > > in).
        > >
        > > In the end, the girl was shaken up, and unfortunately left with
        her
        > > parents (uninjured I was told) before I could offer my apologies.
        > >
        > > The moral of the story? Don't EVER kite too close to people,
        piers,
        > > etc. I stupidly didn't realize that the wind would change as I
        got
        > > closer to the pier. Please don't make the same mistake I did. One
        of
        > > my lines ended up being broken, and that was it. It could have
        been
        > > much worse. I know I learned my lesson.
        > >
        > > Richard
      • vytaspass
        After your sentence: As it did, it caught a 6-year-old girl by the neck. I almost couldn t read on...geez. Stay away from hazards, people! Better a lull than
        Message 3 of 9 , Dec 2, 2002
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          After your sentence:

          "As it did, it caught a 6-year-old girl by the neck."

          I almost couldn't read on...geez. Stay away from hazards, people!

          Better a lull than a gust!

          V
          www.chicagokitesurfing.com

          --- In kitesurf@y..., "richrdwest" <richrdwest@y...> wrote:
          > Today the wind was about the best it has been for a good while near
          > my house in South Orange County California, and I was able to go
          out
          > on my kite for the first time in about a month. It was side shore
          > and just good enough to plain pretty well. Wow, I felt great! After
          > about 1.5 hours I had blown downwind a bit to a pier near a good
          > surf spot.
          >
          > That's when I got a great idea; I'll round the pier and "surf" the
          > spot. Well that's when my good sense started to run out. As I
          neared
          > the end of the pier, the wind started to lull a bit and I noticed
          > that I had drifted pretty close to the pier. Which, by the way, had
          > multiple people fishing, watching the ocean, etc. Instead of
          > immediately turning the kite and heading back in to give myself
          more
          > room, I tried to dive the kite again and to gain speed and clear
          the
          > pier. The only problem was I was now too close. The leading edge
          > line (it was a quad line kite) started to touch the pier and drag
          > along the rail. As it did, it caught a 6-year-old girl by the neck.
          > Thank God she immediately ducked down and the line continued on to
          > hit two more people (at least they were adults). At this point I
          was
          > dragged under the pier and pulled up out of the water where I was
          > slammed onto one of the pilings. Since I was wearing a safety
          lease,
          > the kite depowered on the pier (at least I was smart enough to do
          > that).
          >
          > Deep breath.
          >
          > I then immediately swam to the side and asked if anybody was hurt.
          > Thank God nobody was, in spite of my stupidity. Needless to say, as
          > I did the swim of shame back to the beach, I was kicking myself.
          The
          > lifeguards and people on the pier were much too nice about what I
          > had done (they probably didn't realize the danger I had placed them
          > in).
          >
          > In the end, the girl was shaken up, and unfortunately left with her
          > parents (uninjured I was told) before I could offer my apologies.
          >
          > The moral of the story? Don't EVER kite too close to people, piers,
          > etc. I stupidly didn't realize that the wind would change as I got
          > closer to the pier. Please don't make the same mistake I did. One
          of
          > my lines ended up being broken, and that was it. It could have been
          > much worse. I know I learned my lesson.
          >
          > Richard
        • theflyingtinman
          ... I think that should read ...geez. Stay away from people, hazards! ;-) Steve T.
          Message 4 of 9 , Dec 2, 2002
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            --- In kitesurf@y..., "vytaspass" <surfsup@r...> wrote:
            > After your sentence:
            >
            > "As it did, it caught a 6-year-old girl by the neck."
            >
            > I almost couldn't read on...geez. Stay away from hazards, people!

            I think that should read ...geez. Stay away from people, hazards! ;-)

            Steve T.
          • Kite Power (Sydney)
            Thanks for sharing your experience with us Richard, I wish more people would have the courage to do it. Wind can be affected by all sort of obstacles on land
            Message 5 of 9 , Dec 2, 2002
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              Thanks for sharing your experience with us Richard, I wish more people would
              have the courage to do it.
              Wind can be affected by all sort of obstacles on land or over the water,
              even upwind of the structure.
              Even more so we must all start to think more in advance, make sure we have
              thought about "what if" before we launch at any spot, even the one you use
              all the time.
              Glad everyone survived in one piece Richard and look at the bright side you
              are a much better kiteflier through this experience.
              Cya and Goodwinds,
              Steve McCormack
              302 Grand Pde, Sans Souci, NSW
              tel: (02) 9529 6894
              http://www.kitepower.com.au
              -------------------------------------------------
              Also at Coogee, and Geelong VIC


              Message: 12
              Date: Mon, 02 Dec 2002 02:19:30 -0000
              From: "richrdwest" <richrdwest@...>
              Subject: Stupid Stupid Mistake

              Today the wind was about the best it has been for a good while near
              my house in South Orange County California, and I was able to go out
              on my kite for the first time in about a month. It was side shore
              and just good enough to plain pretty well. Wow, I felt great! After
              about 1.5 hours I had blown downwind a bit to a pier near a good
              surf spot.

              That's when I got a great idea; I'll round the pier and "surf" the
              spot. Well that's when my good sense started to run out. As I neared
              the end of the pier, the wind started to lull a bit and I noticed
              that I had drifted pretty close to the pier. Which, by the way, had
              multiple people fishing, watching the ocean, etc. Instead of
              immediately turning the kite and heading back in to give myself more
              room, I tried to dive the kite again and to gain speed and clear the
              pier. The only problem was I was now too close. The leading edge
              line (it was a quad line kite) started to touch the pier and drag
              along the rail. As it did, it caught a 6-year-old girl by the neck.
              Thank God she immediately ducked down and the line continued on to
              hit two more people (at least they were adults). At this point I was
              dragged under the pier and pulled up out of the water where I was
              slammed onto one of the pilings. Since I was wearing a safety lease,
              the kite depowered on the pier (at least I was smart enough to do
              that).

              Deep breath.

              I then immediately swam to the side and asked if anybody was hurt.
              Thank God nobody was, in spite of my stupidity. Needless to say, as
              I did the swim of shame back to the beach, I was kicking myself. The
              lifeguards and people on the pier were much too nice about what I
              had done (they probably didn't realize the danger I had placed them
              in).

              In the end, the girl was shaken up, and unfortunately left with her
              parents (uninjured I was told) before I could offer my apologies.

              The moral of the story? Don't EVER kite too close to people, piers,
              etc. I stupidly didn't realize that the wind would change as I got
              closer to the pier. Please don't make the same mistake I did. One of
              my lines ended up being broken, and that was it. It could have been
              much worse. I know I learned my lesson.

              Richard
            • speleopower
              I have to reply to this story. It seems to me that the experienced/seasoned guys and girls are the ones getting into trouble more and more due to confidence
              Message 6 of 9 , Dec 2, 2002
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                I have to reply to this story. It seems to me that the
                experienced/seasoned guys and girls are the ones getting into trouble
                more and more due to confidence in their gear, skills and
                conditions. It seems the more confident you are the more you will
                push the limits. I have routinely bypassed sessions this past season
                if conditions are not just right. I have really wanted to go
                kitesurfing quite a few days but my experience (nearing 5 years) and
                learning from other experienced/seasoned riders tragedies, incidents
                and accidents have held me back.
                I guess the moral of the pier story and quite a few of the recent
                accidents recorded is to just avoid bad situations by always way
                underestimating your skills, equipment, conditions and confidence
                especially if you are an experienced/seasoned kitesurfer. But that's
                just me and my take on things. I've only broken my leg once-shallow
                flat water and big jumps ouch!-learned my lesson on that one.
                Fly safe and have fun.

                --- In kitesurf@y..., "Kite Power \(Sydney\)" <sydney@k...> wrote:
                > Thanks for sharing your experience with us Richard, I wish more
                people would
                > have the courage to do it.
                > Wind can be affected by all sort of obstacles on land or over the
                water,
                > even upwind of the structure.
                > Even more so we must all start to think more in advance, make sure
                we have
                > thought about "what if" before we launch at any spot, even the one
                you use
                > all the time.
                > Glad everyone survived in one piece Richard and look at the bright
                side you
                > are a much better kiteflier through this experience.
                > Cya and Goodwinds,
                > Steve McCormack
                > 302 Grand Pde, Sans Souci, NSW
                > tel: (02) 9529 6894
                > http://www.kitepower.com.au
                > -------------------------------------------------
                > Also at Coogee, and Geelong VIC
                >
                >
                > Message: 12
                > Date: Mon, 02 Dec 2002 02:19:30 -0000
                > From: "richrdwest" <richrdwest@y...>
                > Subject: Stupid Stupid Mistake
                >
                > Today the wind was about the best it has been for a good while near
                > my house in South Orange County California, and I was able to go out
                > on my kite for the first time in about a month. It was side shore
                > and just good enough to plain pretty well. Wow, I felt great! After
                > about 1.5 hours I had blown downwind a bit to a pier near a good
                > surf spot.
                >
                > That's when I got a great idea; I'll round the pier and "surf" the
                > spot. Well that's when my good sense started to run out. As I neared
                > the end of the pier, the wind started to lull a bit and I noticed
                > that I had drifted pretty close to the pier. Which, by the way, had
                > multiple people fishing, watching the ocean, etc. Instead of
                > immediately turning the kite and heading back in to give myself more
                > room, I tried to dive the kite again and to gain speed and clear the
                > pier. The only problem was I was now too close. The leading edge
                > line (it was a quad line kite) started to touch the pier and drag
                > along the rail. As it did, it caught a 6-year-old girl by the neck.
                > Thank God she immediately ducked down and the line continued on to
                > hit two more people (at least they were adults). At this point I was
                > dragged under the pier and pulled up out of the water where I was
                > slammed onto one of the pilings. Since I was wearing a safety lease,
                > the kite depowered on the pier (at least I was smart enough to do
                > that).
                >
                > Deep breath.
                >
                > I then immediately swam to the side and asked if anybody was hurt.
                > Thank God nobody was, in spite of my stupidity. Needless to say, as
                > I did the swim of shame back to the beach, I was kicking myself. The
                > lifeguards and people on the pier were much too nice about what I
                > had done (they probably didn't realize the danger I had placed them
                > in).
                >
                > In the end, the girl was shaken up, and unfortunately left with her
                > parents (uninjured I was told) before I could offer my apologies.
                >
                > The moral of the story? Don't EVER kite too close to people, piers,
                > etc. I stupidly didn't realize that the wind would change as I got
                > closer to the pier. Please don't make the same mistake I did. One of
                > my lines ended up being broken, and that was it. It could have been
                > much worse. I know I learned my lesson.
                >
                > Richard
              • terminalveloce
                ... If a little knowledge is dangerous, where is the man who has so much as to be out of danger. Thomas Henry Huxley 1877 ... None of us are that good. ...
                Message 7 of 9 , Dec 3, 2002
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                  I'm not normally into quotes, but this one seemed appropriate:

                  -------------------------------------------------------------------
                  "If a little knowledge is dangerous, where is the man who has so
                  much as to be out of danger."
                  Thomas Henry Huxley 1877
                  -------------------------------------------------------------------

                  None of us are that good.


                  --- In kitesurf@y..., "speleopower" <speleopower@y...> wrote:
                  > I have to reply to this story. It seems to me that the
                  > experienced/seasoned guys and girls are the ones getting into
                  trouble
                  > more and more due to confidence in their gear, skills and
                  > conditions. It seems the more confident you are the more you will
                  > push the limits. I have routinely bypassed sessions this past
                  season
                  > if conditions are not just right. I have really wanted to go
                  > kitesurfing quite a few days but my experience (nearing 5 years)
                  and
                  > learning from other experienced/seasoned riders tragedies,
                  incidents
                  > and accidents have held me back.
                  > I guess the moral of the pier story and quite a few of the recent
                  > accidents recorded is to just avoid bad situations by always way
                  > underestimating your skills, equipment, conditions and confidence
                  > especially if you are an experienced/seasoned kitesurfer. But
                  that's
                  > just me and my take on things. I've only broken my leg once-
                  shallow
                  > flat water and big jumps ouch!-learned my lesson on that one.
                  > Fly safe and have fun.
                  >
                  > --- In kitesurf@y..., "Kite Power \(Sydney\)" <sydney@k...> wrote:
                  > > Thanks for sharing your experience with us Richard, I wish more
                  > people would
                  > > have the courage to do it.
                  > > Wind can be affected by all sort of obstacles on land or over the
                  > water,
                  > > even upwind of the structure.
                  > > Even more so we must all start to think more in advance, make
                  sure
                  > we have
                  > > thought about "what if" before we launch at any spot, even the
                  one
                  > you use
                  > > all the time.
                  > > Glad everyone survived in one piece Richard and look at the
                  bright
                  > side you
                  > > are a much better kiteflier through this experience.
                  > > Cya and Goodwinds,
                  > > Steve McCormack
                  > > 302 Grand Pde, Sans Souci, NSW
                  > > tel: (02) 9529 6894
                  > > http://www.kitepower.com.au
                  > > -------------------------------------------------
                  > > Also at Coogee, and Geelong VIC
                  > >
                  > >
                  > > Message: 12
                  > > Date: Mon, 02 Dec 2002 02:19:30 -0000
                  > > From: "richrdwest" <richrdwest@y...>
                  > > Subject: Stupid Stupid Mistake
                  > >
                  > > Today the wind was about the best it has been for a good while
                  near
                  > > my house in South Orange County California, and I was able to go
                  out
                  > > on my kite for the first time in about a month. It was side shore
                  > > and just good enough to plain pretty well. Wow, I felt great!
                  After
                  > > about 1.5 hours I had blown downwind a bit to a pier near a good
                  > > surf spot.
                  > >
                  > > That's when I got a great idea; I'll round the pier and "surf" the
                  > > spot. Well that's when my good sense started to run out. As I
                  neared
                  > > the end of the pier, the wind started to lull a bit and I noticed
                  > > that I had drifted pretty close to the pier. Which, by the way,
                  had
                  > > multiple people fishing, watching the ocean, etc. Instead of
                  > > immediately turning the kite and heading back in to give myself
                  more
                  > > room, I tried to dive the kite again and to gain speed and clear
                  the
                  > > pier. The only problem was I was now too close. The leading edge
                  > > line (it was a quad line kite) started to touch the pier and drag
                  > > along the rail. As it did, it caught a 6-year-old girl by the
                  neck.
                  > > Thank God she immediately ducked down and the line continued on to
                  > > hit two more people (at least they were adults). At this point I
                  was
                  > > dragged under the pier and pulled up out of the water where I was
                  > > slammed onto one of the pilings. Since I was wearing a safety
                  lease,
                  > > the kite depowered on the pier (at least I was smart enough to do
                  > > that).
                  > >
                  > > Deep breath.
                  > >
                  > > I then immediately swam to the side and asked if anybody was hurt.
                  > > Thank God nobody was, in spite of my stupidity. Needless to say,
                  as
                  > > I did the swim of shame back to the beach, I was kicking myself.
                  The
                  > > lifeguards and people on the pier were much too nice about what I
                  > > had done (they probably didn't realize the danger I had placed
                  them
                  > > in).
                  > >
                  > > In the end, the girl was shaken up, and unfortunately left with
                  her
                  > > parents (uninjured I was told) before I could offer my apologies.
                  > >
                  > > The moral of the story? Don't EVER kite too close to people,
                  piers,
                  > > etc. I stupidly didn't realize that the wind would change as I got
                  > > closer to the pier. Please don't make the same mistake I did. One
                  of
                  > > my lines ended up being broken, and that was it. It could have
                  been
                  > > much worse. I know I learned my lesson.
                  > >
                  > > Richard
                • Greg Walsh
                  Hi All Last week Christian and I did an upwind run to a beach about 3km from where we started. Conditions were a bit gusty and choppy with swells around 1.5-2
                  Message 8 of 9 , Dec 3, 2002
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                    Hi All

                    Last week Christian and I did an upwind run to a beach about 3km from
                    where we started. Conditions were a bit gusty and choppy with swells
                    around 1.5-2 metres.

                    On the way upwind Christian was a little close to the wall at the
                    marina. He would have got away with one tea-bagging but a second
                    bounce and he would have been over the rocks and on his way to being
                    a rigging ornament. Fortunately there was no problem and we continued
                    on our way. I was well out to sea as is my habit.

                    It was a major blast to be riding along side-by-side with kites
                    locked in and just blasting along the coast.

                    When we turned around I just sheeted in and flew downwind from wave-
                    top to wave-top. Big floaty levitations all the way home, often
                    skipping over the trough completely. I have never gone so fast in
                    such big swell conditions in 20 years of windsurfing. It was huge fun
                    and completely effortless.

                    The point of this is there is a whole world of kitesurfing fun to be
                    had out in deep water amongst the bigger swells away from hard stuff
                    and other people.

                    Regards

                    Greg

                    PS. I was using my Vector 11.5 and 195cm directional. Wind was around
                    20 knots cross-onshore (hence the ease of the upwind run).

                    Christian had a 12m Cabrinha and a directional with a broken fin.

                    PPS. My kite/board combination is faster than yours! Nyah!
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