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Re: Please read this

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  • flkitesurfer
    Hello Fabrice, Thanks for offer to help in this! I was contacted by Pacal in Thailand a short while ago. It would be great if you guys could collaborate on
    Message 1 of 5 , Nov 28, 2002
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      Hello Fabrice,

      Thanks for offer to help in this! I was contacted by Pacal in
      Thailand a short while ago. It would be great if you guys could
      collaborate on this. I will contact you by private email in this
      regard.

      Thanks to Mel for your input on the actual Ten Points. You make a
      number of good suggestions. So please keep those ideas coming in.
      Kiteboarding safety like kiteboarding access seems to be a group
      project. I appreciate all the input that has been received so far.

      Rick Iossi

      Thanks,

      Rick

      --- In kitesurf@y..., "flashboarder" <fabrice_willemin@h...> wrote:
      > French needed? I can do it, let me know...
      >
      >
      > --- In kitesurf@y..., "flkitesurfer" <flkitesurfer@h...> wrote:
      > > Lots of accidents out there, too many. It seems that a lot of
      them
      > > could have been avoided if a bit more care had been used. We
      love
      > > this sport and our ability to pursue it. Lets work to protect
      our
      > > ability to ride and while we are at it, ourselves and others.
      > >
      > > The following document has been prepared to go out to shops,
      > > schools, clubs, associations and individual riders everywhere.
      It
      > > would be great to get everyone's input on these two documents,
      > > finalize them and then send them out as widely as possible.
      > >
      > > If you own a shop or school, consider printing the final version
      > out
      > > and passing them along to your customers. Riders could do the
      same
      > > to their friends. We are all in this great sport together and we
      > > will benefit or lose out as our actions dictate. I say, lets
      work
      > to
      > > keep down avoidable accidents and keep our access to ride.
      > >
      > > Some riders are already translating the Ten Points document. It
      > > would be a great thing if other riders could also translate
      these
      > > documents to help spread the word. To avoid repetition it would
      be
      > > good to know what translations are underway.
      > >
      > > I have worked up a shorter version that fits on one page if 8
      pt.
      > > characters are used. If the intro paragraphs don't add anything
      > that
      > > you think might be useful, replace or even delete them. They are
      > > only intended to build a case for the need to follow the
      > > guidelines.I would advise including the last intro paragraph
      that
      > > begins with "Please consider working "Ten Points for
      > > Kiteboarding" ..." at a minimum however.
      > >
      > > TEN POINTS FOR KITEBOARDING
      > >
      > > Kiteboarding is an incredible new extreme sport that is sweeping
      > > around the World. The thrills and shear joy of flashing over the
      > > water and flinging yourself, spinning into the sky at will can
      be
      > > addicting. A good session often enough leaves you hungering for
      > > MORE!
      > >
      > > With all this power, as they said in the movie "Spiderman",
      comes
      > > great responsibility. True story. We were talking about throwing
      > > full grown adults high into the sky over the water for fun,
      > correct?
      > > There is a lot of power there. That is responsibility to protect
      > > bystanders, access for all kiteboarders and yourself for your
      love
      > > ones. Kiteboarding is an incredible rush; severe pain and
      ridicule
      > > from your friends for causing an avoidable accident and
      potentially
      > > loosing access by careless actions are not. We can ride on the
      edge
      > > and visit the extreme but like flying an airplane or rock
      climbing
      > > there is a way and conditions to do it in and some to AVOID.
      > >
      > > This year and particularly in the last month there have been a
      > > number of serious and in some cases fatal kiteboarding
      accidents.
      > > Some of these incidents may have been avoidable if additional
      care
      > > had been taken. Would you fly an airplane into a severe storm
      > cloud?
      > > No, why then would you kiteboard near one? So grab all the
      > > adrenaline rush and sensation that kiteboarding can deliver just
      go
      > > at it with adequate care. If not, don't be surprised if
      something
      > > bad comes your way. It has already for some unfortunate riders.
      > >
      > > Please consider working "Ten Points for Kiteboarding" and other
      > good
      > > practices into your riding habits. They may help to keep both
      you
      > > and bystanders safer and help to maintain access for us all to
      > enjoy
      > > this great sport. The following guidelines have been developed
      in
      > > part from the analysis of almost one hundred kiteboarding
      incidents
      > > and accidents. Even with these guidelines injury can still occur
      in
      > > kiteboarding, so be careful out there.
      > >
      > > 1. TAKE ADEQUATE PRO KITEBOARDING LESSONS FROM A GOOD SCHOOL and
      > > carefully build your experience in manageable conditions.
      Lessons
      > > cost but you will be shredding faster, easier and safer for your
      > > investment and could save your costly gear and even yourself
      from a
      > > bit of shredding.
      > >
      > > 2. CAREFULLY CHECKOUT THE WEATHER color radar, real time wind
      > > reports and forecasts before riding and constantly BE AWARE OF
      > > WEATHER CONDITIONS WHILE RIDING. Conditions should be free of
      > storms
      > > or squalls, excessive gusty winds and be appropriate for your
      level
      > > of experience and equipment. If not, don't go riding. If storms
      or
      > > squalls move in while you are out riding, land, remove the lines
      > and
      > > thoroughly SECURE your kite well in advance of any change in
      wind
      > or
      > > temperature. Offshore and onshore winds should be avoided.
      > REMEMBER:
      > > TWICE THE WIND – FOUR TIMES THE POWER OR KITE AREA! Storms have
      > > already injured a number of kiteboarders.
      > >
      > > 3. USE SAFETY GEAR including a good, appropriate helmet, impact
      > > vest, tested kite leash, reliable quick release chicken loop &
      > fixed
      > > harness line, gloves and hook knife.
      > >
      > > 4. NEVER LAUNCH OR RIDE WITHIN 200 FT. OR 60 M UPWIND OF HARD
      > > OBJECTS like the shore, boats or rocks. In
      kiteboarding "distance
      > is
      > > your friend" and may sometimes forgive serious errors in
      judgment
      > > and just plain bad luck.
      > >
      > > 5. Always methodically and CAREFULLY PREFLIGHT YOUR GEAR,
      checking
      > > the condition and attachment of your lines. Make sure that they
      are
      > > untangled and free of any snags. Do not put off repairs, make
      them
      > > before launching.
      > >
      > > 6. Always try to HAVE ASSISTED LAUNCHES AND LANDINGS WITH AN
      > > EXPERIENCED HELPER who can clearly understand your instructions
      and
      > > signals without error.
      > >
      > > 7. KEEP YOUR KITE LOW IN THE SKY TO TRY TO AVOID LOFTING AND GET
      > > OFFSHORE RAPIDLY. Do not stay on the beach or near hard objects
      > with
      > > a kite in the air. Never jump onshore unless you are up for some
      > > broken bones one of these days. Frequently mentally and
      physically
      > > rehearse dealing with strong gusts and dragging conditions.
      > >
      > > 8. CONSIDER AND PRACTICE LAUNCHING UNHOOKED and be ready to
      release
      > > your bar to activate your kite depowering leash if things go
      wrong.
      > > The earliest that you should consider hooking into a fixed
      harness
      > > line is near the water with your kite low an over the water in
      > order
      > > to pickup your board.
      > >
      > > 9. BE CAREFUL IN AND CONSIDER AVOIDING HIGHER WINDS while
      > > kiteboarding, commonly winds greater than 18 kts or 20 mph. Kite
      > > forces and flight speeds can be much greater and conditions far
      > less
      > > forgiving of errors in judgment and simple bad luck.
      > >
      > > 10. AVOID COMPLAINTS AND HASSLES TO KEEP SHREDDING FREE AND AT
      > WILL.
      > > If you see someone that needs help or good advice, jump into
      help.
      > > If you see someone doing something ill advised grab your friends
      > and
      > > go talk with him convincingly to avoid problems for everyone
      down
      > > the road. When it comes to maintaining access, we are all in
      this
      > > sport together so pitch in and be ready to help.
      > >
      > > These ten points cover aspects presented in the more
      lengthy "Safe
      > > Kiteboarding Guidelines" that have been around for a while with
      > > frequent updates. The Guidelines are located at:
      > >
      > > http://groups.yahoo.com/group/kitesurf/files/KSR%20-%
      > 20KITEBOARDING%
      > > 20SAFETY%20REFERENCES/
      > >
      > > FKA, Inc Transcribed by: Rick Iossi
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