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where is our airush report Darren?!?!

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  • Ron Seydler
    Darren, Come on out with it. I m thinking of getting the 12.2 as a primary kite and need a bit of convincing to part with the cash ;) Ron
    Message 1 of 5 , Feb 27, 2002
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      Darren,

      Come on out with it. I'm thinking of getting the 12.2 as a primary kite and
      need a bit of convincing to part with the cash ;)

      Ron
    • kitesicko
      G Day Ron, I was hoping to do a little more flying on the Lifts before I wrote an indepth review on these kites. After all I wouldn t want to be accused of a
      Message 2 of 5 , Feb 27, 2002
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        G'Day Ron,

        I was hoping to do a little more flying on the Lifts before I wrote
        an indepth review on these kites. After all I wouldn't want to be
        accused of a biased opinion ;-).

        To date I have only flown the 12.2 and the 9.4 in a variety of wind
        conditions. The wind just hasn't been strong enough to warrant
        busting out the 7.4, but we are predicted to get 20-30 knots
        overnight so maybe I'll strap on the torch and hit the water tonight
        for the sake of reviewing the 7.4. :-) Just kidding, but we should
        have some strong wind tomorrow fingers crossed.

        The initial impression I got from the 12.2 turned out to be
        completely wrong, which is why I have waited until I could spend more
        time on the kite.

        I will however give my opinion to date.

        Airush 12.2 Lift. The 12.2 is approximately a 15.2 square metre,
        high aspect kite, that requires some learning to fly it well and
        definately needs to be trimmed correctly. This is why I changed my
        mind after riding it in several different conditions in both flat
        water and surf.

        The wind range would seem to be around 9 - 17 knots. I weigh 80 kg
        and was riding either the Fridge Door 138 or the 147 Flex Tip
        boards. The 12.2 needs to run on it's front lines, if you have too
        much LE flare it will simply stall the kite and produce less lift.
        If it is allowed to fly fast even in light winds, it pulls quite
        nicely.

        The turning of the kite is amazing considering the bar length of
        about 55cm and the pressure on the bar is very light. I have no
        problem getting the kite to whip around on its wingtip with one hand.
        The Lifts generate massive apparent wind power, ie, get up some speed
        and you will have to unhook from the main loop to handle the power
        and speed.

        When I first flew the 12.2, I felt it didn't boost too well, but I
        was not flying the kite properly tuned and in light winds. Two days
        ago at Kurnell in 15 knots I was boosting very large and had loads of
        hangtime, anyone of the witnesses on the day will testify that the
        12.2 does boost large. It is difficult to say how big, big really is
        after jumping on the 9.4 in powered conditions, but by the whistles
        and cheers from the beach I would say "Big".

        The control is very precise and takes a little getting used to. The
        kite does precisely what it is told, which means you had better tell
        it to do the right thing because if you are wrong, the kite will not
        allow for oopses. This also takes a little getting used to, but
        definately improves your skills as a pilot and tends to make you more
        precise to land perfectly. If you do duff a landing, the kite is
        quick enough to recover and rectify the mistake, but as I said you
        need to put in the corrective input.

        The kites stabilty is second to none and I have had comments from
        most people who fly, that the kite is very rigid in the air and looks
        great.

        I am really impressed with the 12.2 and it has definately helped my
        kiting with the new tricks which demand more control and hangtime. I
        was able to start pulling triple back roll foot out transitions which
        I could never do in the past. Boosting is super easy, the kite reacts
        so quickly that there is very little lag time between pulling on the
        bar and being airborn.

        The bar and lines are the best I have seen from any company, and the
        bar comes with the lines attached ready to attach to the kite. I
        have not had to make adjustments to either the 12.2 or the 9.4. They
        both flew perfectly straight from the bag.

        Airush 9.4 Lift. The 9.4 is truly a wicked kite. As with all kites
        of this size (around 11sqm) it is the perfect balance between lift
        and speed. The kite is super solid and flies fast developing huge
        power in lighter than expected winds. I have sailed on the 9.4 in
        winds between 12 and 25 knots with 12 knots being its absolute
        minimum and 25 knots being its absolute maximum.

        Holy shit, the boosting in at the maximum end of the wind range is
        truly frightening, you go so high effortlessly and the hangtime is
        unsurpassed by any kite. I would estimate a 5 second jump is very
        much par for the course on an average big boost. When boosting in 20
        knots, I have had to learn to steer the kite back and forth several
        times to prevent over flying even though the kite is choked to the
        max when fully sheeted in.

        As with the 12.2, this is a very precise kite and will respond very
        quickly to whatever you input. In the surf, the 9.4 is amazing with
        its turns being so fast that the kite will complete a 180 degree turn
        and accelerate away in the opposite direction before I can complete a
        turn on the face of a wave which is brilliant. I often decide to
        snap gybe on a wave only 3 or 4 metres before hitting the wave at
        speed, and the kite is right there driving full noise in the opposite
        direction when I have slid back down the wave. It's truly
        unbelievable!

        Again same as the 12.2 you need to fly these puppies with slack rear
        lines, they don't like trailing edge tension unless flaring on a big
        boost.

        I set the kite so that it has a small amount of flare when I am
        riding in both loops. By small amount of flare, I mean only just
        past parallel wingtips. The temptation to sheet in to get more power
        must be overcome when sailing in light winds as this will stall the
        kite. Just leave it in the main and chicken loop and steer, let the
        kite run and develope it's own power from airspeed.

        When you boost, sheet all the way in which flares the kite, adds huge
        angle of attach and slows the kite down so as you can control it in
        the air. As you come down from the jump turn the kite in the
        direction of intended travel and sheet out a bit to allow the kite to
        accellerate.

        Anyone who buys one of these baby's will be impressed with the
        construction, bar setup and flying performance, but like I said
        earlier, you will have to learn to fly them properly over several
        sessions until you become dialled into the kite. Once you are
        dialled in, it is then totally up to you. For me I have found a kite
        that will allow me to do more than I have been previously able to
        do. It has more performance than I can extract at the moment and I
        relish the opportunity to really push my kite flying skills to a
        higher level.

        I will post agin in the future if my opinion changes and also once I
        have had a few good sessions on the 7.4. I am super stoked and still
        can't believe it everytime I come in after a great session. The
        Lifts exceeded my expectation. The only way for you to find out if
        my opinions are biased is to ride one for yourself, then you will be
        a believer also.

        Cheers,

        Darren Marshall
        Australian Kiteboarding School
        Airush - Team Rider






        --- In kitesurf@y..., Ron Seydler <Ron.Seydler@B...> wrote:
        > Darren,
        >
        > Come on out with it. I'm thinking of getting the 12.2 as a primary
        kite and
        > need a bit of convincing to part with the cash ;)
        >
        > Ron
      • andres_santacruz
        Darren, Good to hear you have been having such a great time. I have a question, what board is the 147 flex tip, brand, pictures? Performance. I haven t heard
        Message 3 of 5 , Feb 27, 2002
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          Darren,
          Good to hear you have been having such a great time. I have a
          question, what board is the 147 flex tip, brand, pictures?
          Performance. I haven't heard of this board before, I am curious.
          Thanks,
          Andres Santacruz

          --- In kitesurf@y..., "kitesicko" <deejay@z...> wrote:
          > G'Day Ron,
          >
          > I was hoping to do a little more flying on the Lifts before I wrote
          > an indepth review on these kites. After all I wouldn't want to be
          >
        • sactear
          Just wanted to add the Airush 16 LIFT to Darren s post on the 12.2 LIFT and 9.4 LIFT below. The 16 LIFT is a surprisingly agile kite, especially considering
          Message 4 of 5 , Feb 27, 2002
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            Just wanted to add the Airush 16 LIFT to Darren's post on the
            12.2 LIFT and 9.4 LIFT below. The 16 LIFT is a surprisingly agile
            kite, especially considering it's large size. On the ground it looks
            to be bigger than a 19.5 ARX even though the LIFT has a surface
            area of 19.4 supposedly - one if the two must be inaccurate. The
            16 LIFT turns nearly the same as the 12.2 LIFT (which is a quick
            turning kite) and flies with a 45-65cm bar, depending on the
            rider's tastes. 30m lines are good for the lower wind range, but it
            probably won't fly well on lines shorter than 25m due to its high
            airspeed. I don't have too much time on mine yet but a friend of
            mine tried it out in 4-5 knots average and was so impressed that
            he went right out and bought one (he had ordered another kite
            from F-One but cancelled to get the Airush because it turned
            easier). In a solid 8 knots the 16 LIFT begins to smoke. I have
            not checked the upper wind limit yet but I hear things get serious
            at 15 knots and above. Like the smaller LIFT kites, the 16 LIFT
            pumps rock hard because it has the same Dacron/Taped
            leading edge construction. The 16 is very usable because it
            turns so well, and it has gobs of power and speed too.
            -Aaron Foster



            --- In kitesurf@y..., "kitesicko" <deejay@z...> wrote:
            > G'Day Ron,
            >
            > I was hoping to do a little more flying on the Lifts before I wrote
            > an indepth review on these kites. After all I wouldn't want to be
            > accused of a biased opinion ;-).
            >
            > To date I have only flown the 12.2 and the 9.4 in a variety of
            wind
            > conditions. The wind just hasn't been strong enough to
            warrant
            > busting out the 7.4, but we are predicted to get 20-30 knots
            > overnight so maybe I'll strap on the torch and hit the water
            tonight
            > for the sake of reviewing the 7.4. :-) Just kidding, but we
            should
            > have some strong wind tomorrow fingers crossed.
            >
            > The initial impression I got from the 12.2 turned out to be
            > completely wrong, which is why I have waited until I could
            spend more
            > time on the kite.
            >
            > I will however give my opinion to date.
            >
            > Airush 12.2 Lift. The 12.2 is approximately a 15.2 square
            metre,
            > high aspect kite, that requires some learning to fly it well and
            > definately needs to be trimmed correctly. This is why I
            changed my
            > mind after riding it in several different conditions in both flat
            > water and surf.
            >
            > The wind range would seem to be around 9 - 17 knots. I
            weigh 80 kg
            > and was riding either the Fridge Door 138 or the 147 Flex Tip
            > boards. The 12.2 needs to run on it's front lines, if you have
            too
            > much LE flare it will simply stall the kite and produce less lift.
            > If it is allowed to fly fast even in light winds, it pulls quite
            > nicely.
            >
            > The turning of the kite is amazing considering the bar length of
            > about 55cm and the pressure on the bar is very light. I have no
            > problem getting the kite to whip around on its wingtip with one
            hand.
            > The Lifts generate massive apparent wind power, ie, get up
            some speed
            > and you will have to unhook from the main loop to handle the
            power
            > and speed.
            >
            > When I first flew the 12.2, I felt it didn't boost too well, but I
            > was not flying the kite properly tuned and in light winds. Two
            days
            > ago at Kurnell in 15 knots I was boosting very large and had
            loads of
            > hangtime, anyone of the witnesses on the day will testify that
            the
            > 12.2 does boost large. It is difficult to say how big, big really
            is
            > after jumping on the 9.4 in powered conditions, but by the
            whistles
            > and cheers from the beach I would say "Big".
            >
            > The control is very precise and takes a little getting used to.
            The
            > kite does precisely what it is told, which means you had better
            tell
            > it to do the right thing because if you are wrong, the kite will
            not
            > allow for oopses. This also takes a little getting used to, but
            > definately improves your skills as a pilot and tends to make
            you more
            > precise to land perfectly. If you do duff a landing, the kite is
            > quick enough to recover and rectify the mistake, but as I said
            you
            > need to put in the corrective input.
            >
            > The kites stabilty is second to none and I have had comments
            from
            > most people who fly, that the kite is very rigid in the air and
            looks
            > great.
            >
            > I am really impressed with the 12.2 and it has definately
            helped my
            > kiting with the new tricks which demand more control and
            hangtime. I
            > was able to start pulling triple back roll foot out transitions
            which
            > I could never do in the past. Boosting is super easy, the kite
            reacts
            > so quickly that there is very little lag time between pulling on
            the
            > bar and being airborn.
            >
            > The bar and lines are the best I have seen from any company,
            and the
            > bar comes with the lines attached ready to attach to the kite. I
            > have not had to make adjustments to either the 12.2 or the 9.4.
            They
            > both flew perfectly straight from the bag.
            >
            > Airush 9.4 Lift. The 9.4 is truly a wicked kite. As with all
            kites
            > of this size (around 11sqm) it is the perfect balance between
            lift
            > and speed. The kite is super solid and flies fast developing
            huge
            > power in lighter than expected winds. I have sailed on the 9.4
            in
            > winds between 12 and 25 knots with 12 knots being its
            absolute
            > minimum and 25 knots being its absolute maximum.
            >
            > Holy shit, the boosting in at the maximum end of the wind
            range is
            > truly frightening, you go so high effortlessly and the hangtime
            is
            > unsurpassed by any kite. I would estimate a 5 second jump is
            very
            > much par for the course on an average big boost. When
            boosting in 20
            > knots, I have had to learn to steer the kite back and forth
            several
            > times to prevent over flying even though the kite is choked to
            the
            > max when fully sheeted in.
            >
            > As with the 12.2, this is a very precise kite and will respond
            very
            > quickly to whatever you input. In the surf, the 9.4 is amazing
            with
            > its turns being so fast that the kite will complete a 180 degree
            turn
            > and accelerate away in the opposite direction before I can
            complete a
            > turn on the face of a wave which is brilliant. I often decide to
            > snap gybe on a wave only 3 or 4 metres before hitting the wave
            at
            > speed, and the kite is right there driving full noise in the
            opposite
            > direction when I have slid back down the wave. It's truly
            > unbelievable!
            >
            > Again same as the 12.2 you need to fly these puppies with
            slack rear
            > lines, they don't like trailing edge tension unless flaring on a
            big
            > boost.
            >
            > I set the kite so that it has a small amount of flare when I am
            > riding in both loops. By small amount of flare, I mean only just
            > past parallel wingtips. The temptation to sheet in to get more
            power
            > must be overcome when sailing in light winds as this will stall
            the
            > kite. Just leave it in the main and chicken loop and steer, let
            the
            > kite run and develope it's own power from airspeed.
            >
            > When you boost, sheet all the way in which flares the kite,
            adds huge
            > angle of attach and slows the kite down so as you can control
            it in
            > the air. As you come down from the jump turn the kite in the
            > direction of intended travel and sheet out a bit to allow the kite
            to
            > accellerate.
            >
            > Anyone who buys one of these baby's will be impressed with
            the
            > construction, bar setup and flying performance, but like I said
            > earlier, you will have to learn to fly them properly over several
            > sessions until you become dialled into the kite. Once you are
            > dialled in, it is then totally up to you. For me I have found a
            kite
            > that will allow me to do more than I have been previously able
            to
            > do. It has more performance than I can extract at the moment
            and I
            > relish the opportunity to really push my kite flying skills to a
            > higher level.
            >
            > I will post agin in the future if my opinion changes and also
            once I
            > have had a few good sessions on the 7.4. I am super stoked
            and still
            > can't believe it everytime I come in after a great session. The
            > Lifts exceeded my expectation. The only way for you to find out
            if
            > my opinions are biased is to ride one for yourself, then you will
            be
            > a believer also.
            >
            > Cheers,
            >
            > Darren Marshall
            > Australian Kiteboarding School
            > Airush - Team Rider
            >
            >
            >
            >
            >
            >
            > --- In kitesurf@y..., Ron Seydler <Ron.Seydler@B...> wrote:
            > > Darren,
            > >
            > > Come on out with it. I'm thinking of getting the 12.2 as a
            primary
            > kite and
            > > need a bit of convincing to part with the cash ;)
            > >
            > > Ron
          • kitesicko
            G Day Andres, The 147 is the newest production board from Underground. It is 147 long by about 38 wide and is wider in the ends than the Dinner Tray (DT151)
            Message 5 of 5 , Feb 28, 2002
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              G'Day Andres,

              The 147 is the newest production board from Underground. It is 147
              long by about 38 wide and is wider in the ends than the Dinner Tray
              (DT151) but narrower than the Fridge Door (FD138). It comes off the
              same rocker jig as the FD138 but has a lot more kick in the ends,
              which gives it the appearance of having more rocker.

              The real difference is the amount of flex in the ends of the board.
              You can flex the tips with moderate pressure from your hands and the
              curve carries through to around the footstrap position.

              I think I actually like this board better than the fridge Door. It
              gets up and planing in about the same wind and has a much looser more
              fluid feel to it than the FD. Especially in the surf when carving
              powerful turns on the wave. The flex is also noticeable when you
              leave the kite really low and just pop off the tail into a front
              loop, you can notice the extra pop.

              JB, the other team rider doesn't like his much because he rides
              really powered up and the board doesn't blow off power as well as the
              fridge door when you want to slow down by standing on the tail. I
              find this problem, not a problem at all and haven't noticed this as a
              dilemma at all.

              It certainly feels really snappy and grippy when carving which is
              what I like about it, just more positive smooth carves and more
              control. I did however notice that when in Augusta, sailing in
              glassy flat water at terminal velocity the board would start to
              bounce out, but in normal conditions, you cannot ride anywhere near
              this sort of speed so it is inconsequential. The FD did hold
              slightly more pace due to its shorter rail and flatter bottom without
              the additional tail lift, this is only for Augusta though, I find the
              147 rides chop a little better and is more forgiving in rolling chop
              and small swells due to the board shaping it's rocker to suit the
              amount of pressure you apply to it in the turn.

              Does this answer your question? I hadn't really thought to do a
              board review on the 147 as my fascination has been with the kites for
              the last few weeks.

              Kite ON!

              Darren Marshall
              http://www.australiankiteboardingschool.com
              Airush Team Rider
              Underground Team Rider



              --- In kitesurf@y..., "andres_santacruz" <andysantacruz@h...> wrote:
              > Darren,
              > Good to hear you have been having such a great time. I have a
              > question, what board is the 147 flex tip, brand, pictures?
              > Performance. I haven't heard of this board before, I am curious.
              > Thanks,
              > Andres Santacruz
              >
              > --- In kitesurf@y..., "kitesicko" <deejay@z...> wrote:
              > > G'Day Ron,
              > >
              > > I was hoping to do a little more flying on the Lifts before I
              wrote
              > > an indepth review on these kites. After all I wouldn't want to
              be
              > >
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